Schwinn electric bike

Schwinn electric bike DEFAULT

Schwinn EC1 Cruiser-Style

Schwinn brand was established in 1895 in Chicago and is providing great quality riding bikes for everyone. You can find a lot of different bike types starting from the basic bike to mountain, urban, electric or cruiser bikes for men, women, and kids. The price range is also different for the Schwinn e-bikes and it varies from $1000 to $2000 or even more. In this review, we are going to discuss some basic features and get to know the Schwinn EC1 electric bike.

 

The Schwinn EC1 electric bike is a unisex bike that has a powerful 250W mid-drive motor that comes with a thumb-pad controller as well. You can easily control your bike with the controller and see the battery life or assistance level. Also, the EC1 electric bike has 5 pedal-assist levels that you can choose from. The Schwinn EC1 electric bike has a top speed of 20 MPH and the battery can last up to 45 minutes (depending on the surface and the riding style.) You can fully charge the battery in 6 hours.

 

The Schwinn EC1 pedal assist electric bike comes with a step-thru aluminium alloy frame that allows you to get a relaxed comfortable position. The bike comes with one frame size and a 2-year warranty on the battery and electric parts. The colours are blue, yellow and black.  There might be other great mountain-type electric bikes, however, they can be expensive. The Schwinn EC1 is versatile and cheaper version of a great city and off-road bike.

User Reviews

★★★★★
★★★★★
★★★★★
★★★★★
★★★★★
Sours: https://www.wearethecyclists.com/ebike/schwinn-ec1-cruiser-style/

Review: Schwinn EC1 electric bike is an affordable e-cruiser for just $898

Admit it, there’s something nostalgic about Schwinn bikes — a trusty old Schwinn that reminds you of your childhood. Well, get ready for this, because the Schwinn EC1 electric bicycle gives that same old feel of a classic Schwinn cruiser but adds a nice, firm electric boost to your ride. And it’s currently on sale for a killer price of just $898.

Schwinn EC1 electric bicycle

Let’s me start off by properly framing your expectations. The Schwinn EC1 isn’t a powerhouse, and it doesn’t have top-shelf components.

But what it does have is a reliable and peppy motor, a suite of simple parts, and a comfortable pedal assist that gives you the joy of a classic cruiser ride without the effort that normally goes into pedaling a big ol’ cruiser bike.

And with a step-through-ish frame courtesy of the medium height top tube, this is one e-bike that can be a classy ride for that special man or woman in your life.

So buckle up and check out the video review of the Schwinn EC1 below, then read on for all the tech specs and juicy details.

Schwinn EC1 video review

You know you want to see how this bike rides. Check it out below!

Schwinn EC1 e-bike tech specs

  • Motor: 250 W geared rear hub motor
  • Top speed: 32 km/h (20 mph) with pedal assist
  • Range: Up to 51 km (30 mi)
  • Battery: 36 V
  • Frame: Aluminum
  • Suspension: None
  • Brakes: Front and rear mechanical disc brakes
  • Shifter: 7-speed Shimano Tourney derailleur
  • Extras: 2-year warranty on battery and electric assist parts, lifetime warranty on frame, shock-absorbing dual spring cruiser saddle, LED display for battery gauge and PAS level indicator, and rear rack/fenders included standard.
Scwinn EC1 e-bike
Scwinn EC1 e-bike
Scwinn EC1 e-bike

A comfortable, pleasurable ride

The Schwinn EC1 is one of those simple e-bikes that can reliably bring a smile to your face.

There’s nothing overly fancy about it, though I’d say the fact that it comes with built-in fenders and a rear rack is a nice feature. Many other e-bike companies charge extra for those parts.

But while the Schwinn EC1 isn’t a fancy cruiser, it is a comfortable and pleasurable ride. The 250 W motor doesn’t sound powerful, but when I put it in the highest assist level I don’t have to do any work. I can just lightly spin the pedals to activate the pedal sensor and the motor does all the work for me.

But of course half the fun of riding a bike is using your own power for propulsion (or at least sharing the load). So I usually found myself keeping it in the second or third pedal assist level out of five total levels.

There I could add some pedal effort without getting tired, leaving me feeling satisfied with my exercise level but not so overly exerted that I couldn’t enjoy the beautiful trails around me.

Speaking of trails, I found that the Schwinn EC1 is great for more than just nice bike lanes and smooth sidewalks. The decently large tires also make it a fun bike for nature trails and gravel paths. It can handle grass, dirt, and light rocks. I wouldn’t want to take it off any jumps due to the lack of suspension, but it’s not really meant for that, either. This is a relaxed, upright cruiser that has the ability to handle a fairly wide range of riding trails.

The components aren’t high-end, mind you. But even the mid- to low-end Shimano parts are perfectly fine for this level of bike.

And at the end of the day, we’re talking about an affordable cruiser, so I didn’t expect to find high-end shifters, hydraulic disc brakes, or suspension on the bike. The Shimano Tourney shifter, mechanical disc brakes, and plushy spring saddle are enough for me. I’ve seen this level of components on electric cruisers that cost nearly twice as much.

At just $898 with its current Black Friday sale price, the Schwinn EC1 definitely offers more bang for your buck than a lot of other electric bikes out there.

And with a two-year warranty on the electric components and a lifetime warranty on the frame, you don’t have to worry that it’s going to fall apart like a mystery $450 e-bike from Amazon.

Let us know what you think of the Schwinn EC1 electric cruiser bike in the comments below!

FTC: We use income earning auto affiliate links.More.

Black Friday

Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe to the podcast.

Sours: https://electrek.co/2019/11/28/review-schwinn-ec1-electric-bicycle-affordable-e-bike/
  1. Hp elitebook 840 accessories
  2. Scp omni card
  3. Undercut long bob haircut
  4. Schwinn mens bikes

Review: Schwinn EC1 electric bike is an affordable e-cruiser for just $898

Admit it, there’s something nostalgic about Schwinn bikes — a trusty old Schwinn that reminds you of your childhood. Well, get ready for this, because the Schwinn EC1 electric bicycle gives that same old feel of a classic Schwinn cruiser but adds a nice, firm electric boost to your ride. And it’s currently on sale for a killer price of just $898.

Schwinn EC1 electric bicycle

Let’s me start off by properly framing your expectations. The Schwinn EC1 isn’t a powerhouse, and it doesn’t have top-shelf components.

But what it does have is a reliable and peppy motor, a suite of simple parts, and a comfortable pedal assist that gives you the joy of a classic cruiser ride without the effort that normally goes into pedaling a big ol’ cruiser bike.

And with a step-through-ish frame courtesy of the medium height top tube, this is one e-bike that can be a classy ride for that special man or woman in your life.

So buckle up and check out the video review of the Schwinn EC1 below, then read on for all the tech specs and juicy details.

Schwinn EC1 video review

You know you want to see how this bike rides. Check it out below!

Schwinn EC1 e-bike tech specs

  • Motor: 250 W geared rear hub motor
  • Top speed: 32 km/h (20 mph) with pedal assist
  • Range: Up to 51 km (30 mi)
  • Battery: 36 V
  • Frame: Aluminum
  • Suspension: None
  • Brakes: Front and rear mechanical disc brakes
  • Shifter: 7-speed Shimano Tourney derailleur
  • Extras: 2-year warranty on battery and electric assist parts, lifetime warranty on frame, shock-absorbing dual spring cruiser saddle, LED display for battery gauge and PAS level indicator, and rear rack/fenders included standard.
Scwinn EC1 e-bike
Scwinn EC1 e-bike
Scwinn EC1 e-bike

A comfortable, pleasurable ride

The Schwinn EC1 is one of those simple e-bikes that can reliably bring a smile to your face.

There’s nothing overly fancy about it, though I’d say the fact that it comes with built-in fenders and a rear rack is a nice feature. Many other e-bike companies charge extra for those parts.

But while the Schwinn EC1 isn’t a fancy cruiser, it is a comfortable and pleasurable ride. The 250 W motor doesn’t sound powerful, but when I put it in the highest assist level I don’t have to do any work. I can just lightly spin the pedals to activate the pedal sensor and the motor does all the work for me.

But of course half the fun of riding a bike is using your own power for propulsion (or at least sharing the load). So I usually found myself keeping it in the second or third pedal assist level out of five total levels.

There I could add some pedal effort without getting tired, leaving me feeling satisfied with my exercise level but not so overly exerted that I couldn’t enjoy the beautiful trails around me.

Speaking of trails, I found that the Schwinn EC1 is great for more than just nice bike lanes and smooth sidewalks. The decently large tires also make it a fun bike for nature trails and gravel paths. It can handle grass, dirt, and light rocks. I wouldn’t want to take it off any jumps due to the lack of suspension, but it’s not really meant for that, either. This is a relaxed, upright cruiser that has the ability to handle a fairly wide range of riding trails.

The components aren’t high-end, mind you. But even the mid- to low-end Shimano parts are perfectly fine for this level of bike.

And at the end of the day, we’re talking about an affordable cruiser, so I didn’t expect to find high-end shifters, hydraulic disc brakes, or suspension on the bike. The Shimano Tourney shifter, mechanical disc brakes, and plushy spring saddle are enough for me. I’ve seen this level of components on electric cruisers that cost nearly twice as much.

At just $898 with its current Black Friday sale price, the Schwinn EC1 definitely offers more bang for your buck than a lot of other electric bikes out there.

And with a two-year warranty on the electric components and a lifetime warranty on the frame, you don’t have to worry that it’s going to fall apart like a mystery $450 e-bike from Amazon.

Let us know what you think of the Schwinn EC1 electric cruiser bike in the comments below!

FTC: We use income earning auto affiliate links.More.

Black Friday

Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe to the podcast.

Sours: https://electrek.co/2019/11/28/review-schwinn-ec1-electric-bicycle-affordable-e-bike/

Schwinn Tailwind electric bike review

Schwinn's Tailwind electric bike -- which has been available for just a few months -- has been sitting in our apartment since post CES, waiting for the New York weather to shape up enough for us to give it a fair spin. Well, it's been beautiful recently, so the pedal-assist bike has been taken for several spins on our backyard BMX trail to see what kind of dust we could raise together. The bike is a retro, hulking, 58 pound package, with a Toshiba SCiB Quick Charge Plug n' Drive (SCiB) battery saddled onto the back for about 30 miles of assistance. It's an expensive (about $3,200) piece of eco-friendly transportation, to be sure. So the questions are thus: what do we think about Schwinn's latest foray into commuter cycles? Just who is this bike for? Will we ever get used to carrying it up and down our apartment stairs? Join us on the road after the break.

Looks and specifications

The Tailwind is outfitted with a Schwinn City-Tuned 6000 series aluminum alloy frame which makes for an upright riding position, a Shimano Nexus 8-speed internal geared hub and rear roller brake, alloy rims, full fenders, a chain cover, wheel lock, and a B+M dynamo powered light set. All that, plus the six-pound Toshiba battery housed behind the seat, makes the bike quite heavy, and, in some ways, a bit clunky feeling to move around when you're not riding it. Where an average bike weighs about 35 pounds, the Tailwind, as we mentioned, weighs 58 pounds. Of course -- this bike does a lot more than your average bike, and its weight is actually fairly low for electric bikes (plus, we're huge wimps).

The whole package is aesthetically really old-timey looking -- which will not please everybody, though we find it to be really quite charming. It's surprisingly elegant, and though one friend described it as "goofy" looking, we think that its look suits the intended rider -- but more on that below. The bike comes with a standard residential 8.4 amp charger that you plug into the battery and a wall outlet, and the bike gets a full charge in about 30 minutes (there's also a 40 amp commercial charger that will have you moving in less than 10). For those not terribly familiar with electric bikes, the Schwinn's battery charges up about as fast as its contemporaries on the market, and is actually much faster than many.

Performance

After charging up the battery, sliding it into the rack system at the back of the bike (which could not be simpler), and locking it into place, you're ready to go. The bike comes with a key which both locks the battery in place and enables the bike to be turned on. Without the key -- well, the bike is just a bike. There is a battery life indicator on the left handlebar, and the Shimano Revo-shift lever -- which controls what gear you're in -- on the right. Riding this Schwinn without the pedal assistance on is, as you'd expect, just like riding any other bike... but way heavier. That said, the ride is extremely smooth and comfortable (likely helped by that excess weight), and it's obvious by the design that the bike has an eye on casual cruising -- and it definitely delivers that.

So what's the story with the pedal assist juice? Well, let's just say it really, seriously provides assistance. After you crank it on (okay, there's no cranking involved -- just a button press), you'll feel it kick in after maybe five seconds. It's a bit jarring the first time or two, but that's par for the course, and you'll warm up to it quickly. Once the electric's on, there are three modes of assistance to choose from on that left control panel -- flat, downhill, and hill climbing. On flat riding roads, where we did most of our testing, the assistance creates an experience where, though you still need to pedal, you can definitely feel a substantial amount of help from the motor. We're not saying it's without effort, but it's a greatly reduced effort. Uphill, however, we definitely expended a significantly higher amount of energy with our toothpick-like legs. The assistance is there, but it doesn't enable you to truck up huge hills super fast -- it'll give you enough of a boost so that you're not completely annihilated, but doesn't do all the work by a longshot. On flat roads, shifting gears will allow you to put more or less effort into your ride as you please, allowing for a lot of levity in the experience. We didn't clock our speeds, but the bike can supposedly top about 15 miles per hour on flat ground with the pedal-assist on, and that sounds about right to us.

Gallery: Waking Mars (3/1/12) | 15 Photos

There are a few things to know about the motor itself in action. First, if you stop pedaling, after a few seconds, the pedal assist will shut down -- until you begin pedaling again, which will kick it back on. Second, when you brake, same thing -- the juice cuts off. These things do take some getting used to, but with repeated tests became expected, second nature behaviors of the bike. The battery, which cannot be plugged in or charged while attached to the bike, is advertised as lasting up to 30 miles per charge. We rode the bike for over an hour without seeing it completely drained of its juice, but keep in mind that you'll either need to bring the charger with you or take it back home for another plug-in to get the electric flowing again should it die on you. Then again -- the bike is still a functioning piece of equipment once the battery is dead, so maybe we should all stop being so lazy.

There were only two really minor complaints here -- the brakes can be a tiny bit jerky for our tastes, and we heard a bit of rattling from the battery pack when jetting over bumpy terrain, which made us a little nervous. Regardless, the battery seemed to be securely locked into its rack, so it's probably not an actual concern, and probably just more mounting evidence of our insane paranoia.

So who is the tailwind for?

The Tailwind's frame is meant for flat city or suburban riding, and, at the end of the day, Schwinn's entire package here hits dead-on a really specific and growing demographic. There is a small but ever heightening interest in alternatives to gas automobiles in the US, and bicycles, as evidenced by bike-friendly cities such as Portland and Minneapolis. Less pedal-happy cities are beginning to see the advantages of cycling (less pollution, less car traffic) and taking steps to reform their towns. Simply put -- plenty of people would rather bike to work than drive there, if distance and climate factors are in their favor, for reasons environmental and health-related. The Tailwind is a solid option and is aimed squarely at those people -- you can get to and from work without sweating profusely and horrifying your co-workers, and the little extras like the on-board lights really make it a feasible means of transportation in that regard.

$3,200 isn't cheap by any means, though it would be, over time, an extremely economical purchase when compared to fueling and car costs. There are other drawbacks, too. Anyone with a small apartment will be hard pressed to find a place to keep the Tailwind, and it's not a likely candidate for one of those wall-hung bike racks, either. Additionally, the weight of the bike makes it pretty inconvenient to carry up and down stairs on a regular basis. But, if you have a place to lock it up and store it, are looking for an attractive commuter bicycle, and you have a decent disposable income (or are willing to make an investment purchase), this is a really stellar choice. If, however, you're looking for a bike to speed away from vampires in a hilly, dangerous, pothole-ridden apocalyptic nightmare (such as, say, North Brooklyn), you might want to consider other, slightly less cumbersome options.

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.
Sours: https://www.engadget.com/2009-05-22-schwinn-tailwind-electric-bike-review.html

Bike schwinn electric

Schwinn Tailwind

The Schwinn Tailwind is one amongst a large number of electric bicycles available today, a segment gaining popularity due to interest in transportation alternatives to the car. But don't expect to sit back and let the Tailwind whisk you along--the electric motor on this bike merely provides assistance; the rider still has to pedal.

We found the Tailwind works largely as advertised, with a nice assist while riding around town and a battery with a high capacity that recharges quickly. On our test bike, the front brakes were too grabby, and we wondered why such an expensive bike wouldn't have disc brakes. And the price of the Tailwind, above $3,000, puts it far beyond the realm of people who may just have a casual interest in an electric bike.

Design

The frame for the Schwinn Tailwind's electric gear is built for urban and suburban riding. The aluminum frame, along with the upward curved handlebars, creates an upright sitting position.

The electric drive system is integrated with the bike through a drive motor in the front wheel hub, a battery that slides into a special luggage rack over the rear wheel, and a control unit tied to the left handlebar. The gear shift for the rear hub is integrated with the right handlebar grip. The control unit is easy to use, with thumb buttons to activate the electrical system and change the amount of assistance from the electric motor. Graphics on the control unit illustrate going up hill, riding on a flat surface, or going downhill. Red LEDs show which mode you have selected and indicate how much charge the battery has left.

Schwinn Tailwind control unit

The lithium ion battery pack weighs 6 pounds and is about 15 inches long by 6 inches wide. We found some problems with the way it mounts to the bike. First, after sliding it into place on the luggage rack, it is supposed to lock into place by flipping down its red handle. We found that it doesn't lock very securely, and riding over bumpy pavement can cause it to slip so that it loses its electrical connection. This handle also doesn't provide enough room for your fingers when you are carrying the battery pack. Second, putting that weight over the rear wheel makes the Tailwind more likely to flip over when the bike is stopped suddenly. Our test bike's front brakes were particularly grabby, causing an end-over incident during an emergency stop.

Finally, the position of the plug connector for the battery pack means it can only be recharged when taken off the bike. It would be more convenient if it could be left in position on the bike and plugged in.

Features

The Schwinn Tailwind uses a Shimano eight-speed gearset in the rear hub, its limited gear ratio making the bike mostly suitable for flat areas. Cantilever brakes grab the rims for stopping power, although with the price of this bike, we would expect disc brakes. Front and rear lights that run off a traditional tire-contact generator are included. The bike also has a caliper lock for the rear wheel.

Schwinn Tailwind battery

The motor kicks in after about five seconds of pedaling, but we would like to have seen an instant power button on the control module. If you stop pedaling, letting the bike coast, the motor will disengage after a few seconds, and you will need to pedal again to engage it. Applying the brakes immediately cuts off the motor assist. The motor itself, mounted in the front hub, has 250 watts of peak power, and gets its electricity from the 24-volt battery pack. The electric system has three modes: hill-climb, flat, and downhill, changing the amount of motor assist with each one.

The battery pack has a charge indicator, useful when the pack is removed from the bike. A lock in the side of the battery pack turns the power on and off. A separate charger is included that can be plugged into any conventional AC wall outlet.

Performance

Tailwind is a very apt name for this bike, as the motor gives a palpable assist when it kicks in. Because of the way the motor engages, after about five seconds of pedaling, the electric assist can come on unexpectedly, at least the first few times you ride this bike. After a while you get used to the timing of the assist. But the motor doesn't have nearly enough power to pull the bike along by itself, and you will find you are getting some exercise while riding it.

Schwinn Tailwind motor

On flat roads, we found the assist useful, helping the bike along with minimal pedal input required. The gears allow you to put in as much physical exertion as you feel like. From a stop, it's good to have the bike in low gear, otherwise starting out can be difficult, made more so by the fact the motor won't kick in until you've been pedaling.

We tried the Tailwind up a particularly challenging hill, putting it in its lowest gear and putting the electric assist on maximum. Even with the bike assisting as best it could, climbing the hill required a lot of physical exertion, although it would have been harder without the electric motor.

Schwinn advertises the Tailwind as being rechargeable in just half an hour. In our testing we found this to be the case. However, because of the dedicated external charger, you will either need to bring the bike back home or bring the charger with you to top up the battery. The battery capacity is high enough for extended riding. We rode the Tailwind for an hour without discharging the battery completely.

Sours: https://www.cnet.com/roadshow/news/schwinn-tailwind-e-bike-first-take/
$898 Walmart eBike - Schwinn Sidewinder 250w eBike

Old a virgin !!!. It's just that she is from that breed of bitches who love to fuck the brains of men, twirl her booty in front of them and not give, now you understand. What I got into ??. In addition, a perverted virgin, i. jerk yourself off in all possible positions yes, fuck yourself in the ass with a banana yes, but give a dick to a live man !!.

You will also like:

As the muscles in my vagina began to twitch convulsively, Jeff pulled my cock out of me. He started throwing loads of semen directly onto my body. I grabbed some semen with my hand and anointed my breasts with it. He lay down on me and kissed me. Not bad for a virgin.



875 876 877 878 879