Petg retraction settings

Petg retraction settings DEFAULT

PETG retraction settings  

PETG retraction settings

Hey there,

for some reason I can't figure out the right retraction settings for PETG, sadly. Stringing is no problem for PLA prints, but for PETG I just can't get it completely right. I'll try to add some pictures...

That was printed with 230°C and 0.8mm retraction at 25 mm/s since that works at least a little better than the default PETG profile. Extrusion multiplier is calibrated for the filament and the print itself is super accurate, beside the stringing problems. I could live with the spiderwebs, but at some spots they build up into those little branches that are hard to clean up.

What's most odd is that a retraction test ( http://retractioncalibration.com/) shows no combination of retraction length and speed that would be usable. All the way from 0.5 to 2.0mm and retraction speed from 15-60 mm/s. Tried this with 3 different rolls of PETG.

For reference, here is a test sample of PLA:

Printer is an MK3S+. Any help would be appreciated, since this is driving me nuts 🙂

Best,

Daniel

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Posted : 08/05/2021 9:24 am
Sours: https://forum.prusaprinters.org/forum/original-prusa-i3-mk3s-mk3-how-do-i-print-this-printing-help/petg-retraction-settings/

PETG filament is perhaps the best material for 3D Printing. It’s extremely durable, has a moderate amount of flex, and it’s quite easy to print. Widely used in manufacturing, it can be injection molded, vacuum formed and extruded. As an FDA Approved resin, it’s also considered food safe and recyclable.

This guide looks at what we need to know when getting started. Small adjustments can make a world of difference, from the fan speed to print temperatures. With the proper slicer settings and hardware, it might just replace PLA as your preferred choice.

PETG Pink Vase

What is PETG?

PETG is a modified version of Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET), the plastic used for water bottles and food packaging. The addition of Glycol (G) makes this variant far easier to print, increasing the flexibility and impact resistance while reducing brittleness and hazing.

Comparable to PLA’s ease of use, and offering the same strength and durability as ABS, it has the best characteristics of both materials rolled into one. It is however hydroscopic, meaning it will actively absorb moisture from the air that can affect prints.

Proper filament storage is necessary in humid environments. Spools that have already absorbed moisture can be restored with a DIY filament dryer (How to Make a Filament Dryer for $30).

Pros

  • Easy to print
  • Strong and durable
  • Odorless printing
  • Food Safe and Recyclable

Cons

  • Stringing and blobs
  • Poor bridging characteristics
  • Hydroscopic (absorbs moisture)
  • No UV Resistance

Do I need an All Metal Hotend?

The short answer is no, but it’s strongly recommended.

3D Printer’s comes with a PTFE lined hotend, perfect for PLA and ABS filaments. However, that tube starts to degrade at higher temperatures, becoming soft and no longer able to retain its shape. This deterioration can also release toxic fumes, although at what temperature that occurs, no one can say for sure. To be on the safe side, it’s best to avoid prolonged use above 240° Celsius.

For occasional PETG prints, the stock hotend should be fine. Some recommend replacing the white PTFE tube with Capricorn Tubing, also known as Luke’s Hotend Fix. This may slow the speed at which the tube breaks down, but it’s not a permanent solution.

The best choice long term is an all metal hotend. Designed to eliminate the PTFE tube, they are safe to use at much hotter temperatures. Creality 3D Printers like the Ender 3 and CR10 will find the Micro Swiss All Metal Hotend to be a simple drop-in upgrade. Other 3D Printer models will generally be better suited with a universal option like the V6 All Metal Hotend.

Best Filament Brands

Shopping for filament can be overwhelming. There are dozens of brands and hundreds of colors to choose from. However, there’s a select few considered to be among the best, offering tight dimensional tolerances and producing consistent results.

Overture is the new king of budget filament. If you’re on the fence and can’t decide, this is a safe bet in the $20 price range. It also comes with a resealable bag for storage and a BuildTak style print surface. Hatchbox and eSun are also great brands, catering to the 3D Printer industry for more than 6 years.

For first time users, stick with something inexpensive and well reviewed. Premium options like Priline’s Carbon Fiber PETG make gorgeous prints, but use something cheap to dial in your settings first.

Bed Leveling

PLA is the first filament we use, and it’s often our reference point for other plastics. As such, most are familiar with bed leveling using a sheet of notebook paper (thickness: 0.1mm), where the first layer needs to be smushed into the build plate.

PETG on the other hand works best with a slightly larger gap between the nozzle and bed. If the nozzle is too close, it won’t flow properly and may cause the extruder to jam. If the nozzle is too far, the filament won’t stick to the heated bed. For best results, fold the notebook paper to double the thickness, or substitute it with an index card.

  • PLA Bed Leveling
  • PETG Bed Leveling

PETG Temperatures

PETG filament has a higher melting point than PLA. It flows best between 230-260C, and heated bed adhesion between 80-90C (depends on brand). Every roll of filament is different to some degree, check the Manufacturer’s suggested temperature range listed on the side.

Nozzle Temperature: 230C – 260C
Bed Temperature: 80C – 90C

As with any new filament, it’s always advised to print a Temperature Tower first. This will give you an idea how it looks, feels and prints at incremental temperatures. If the nozzle is too cold, layers will not bond well and split apart (delaminate). If the nozzle is too hot, it will cause excessive stringing, oozing and blobbing.

Should you find the print temperatures are unstable and fluctuating, do a PID Tune on your hotend. It will recalibrate the Kp, Ki and Kd values based on your current hardware, stabilizing the readings for best results.

PETG Fan Speeds

Does PETG need a cooling fan? No, it will print anywhere from 0-100% fan speed depending on your intended goal. The amount of cooling should be chosen based on the purpose of the part.

Low Fan Speed: The less cooling used, the stronger the part will be. The molten plastic essentially melts into the previous layers, providing exceptional adhesion to one another. The downside is that this can lower the aesthetic quality, a trade off for much stronger parts.

As can be seen in the image, bridges and overhangs will suffer the most without proper cooling. To address this problem, it is recommended to use the Bridging Fan Speed Override setting in Simplify3D or a similar feature within your desired slicer software.

Temperature Tower
Dii Cooler vs Stock Cooler

High Fan Speed: The faster the part is cooled, the better it will look when finished. This is often the best choice for vanity prints such as masks, vases and other aesthetically pleasing designs. It will not offer the same level of durability as prints that set at room temperature, however the overall surface finish will be a drastic improvement.

The temperate tower on the left was printed at 100% fan with a 50mm blower fan and the Dii Cooler, where the tower on the right was printed using the low powered stock fan. The higher powered fan causes the plastic to set quickly, which prevents the bridges from sagging and overhangs from warping at the edges.

PETG Settings

Printing a different filament is all about finding the right balance of settings. While there is a small learning curve, it’s a considerably better choice for most applications. There is no getting around the need to experiment, but the following should work as guidelines when building your own configurations.

Setting NameSetting Value
Print SpeedUse a slow speed for the first layer to ensure proper adhesion to the build plate. This should generally be around 25% of your normal print speed.

Start with 40 mm/s as the base speed and increase this gradually until you find the perfect speed for your printer.

Print Speed (Layer 1): 10 mm/s
Print Speed (Layer 2+): 40 mm/s
Print TemperatureThe print temperature will affect the object’s appearance and durability. The recommend temperatures below are median values, tune as needed. More heat to the extruder will increase the flow of plastic (and increase stringing), where 245C is a good starting point.

Print Temperature: 245C
Bed TemperatureBed Temperature: 85C
Retraction DistancePETG filament is prone to stringing, where the proper retraction distance will help to minimize this. Start with these settings and tune as needed. Increase if stringing is present, decrease if you experience clogs.

Retraction Distance (Bowden – Stock): 6.0 mm
Retraction Distance (Bowden – All Metal): 3.5 mm

Retraction Distance (Direct Drive- Stock): 2.0 mm
Retraction Distance (Direct Drive- All Metal): 1.0 mm
Retraction Speed
Fan SpeedMake sure the first layer is set to 0% to ensure proper adhesion. From layer 2 and on, choose the fan speed based on the purpose of the part.

Lower fan speeds for strength and higher fan speeds for aesthetics. The “Bridge Fan Speed Override” is essential for good bridges.

Fan Speed (Layer 1): 0%
Fan Speed (Layer 2+): See Details Above

Bridging Fan Speed Override: 100%
First LayerUse Skirt: Enabled
Skirt Outlines: 2

First Layer Height: 90%
First Layer Width: 100%
Sours: https://letsprint3d.net/how-to-print-petg/
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Retraction is concerned with pulling the filament all the way back during its travel time. If done correctly, it will take all of the pressure from the nozzle of the printer. Virtually every 3D slicer engine available today has certain settings when it comes to getting rid of 3D printing stringing. They help ensure that you will be able to get into the sweet “no stringing” zone. This way you will be able to enjoy all of our prints with your Ender 3 machine.

Let us study Creality’s Ender 3 retraction settings with the help of the Cura slicer. It has all the relevant settings for stringing 3D printing as well as the recommended values for each filament type.

The recommended values are a good baseline and you can adjust up and down from there.

Best Retraction Settings for Ender 3

What is Retraction Travel Speed?

The retraction speed of your Ender 3 will determine precisely how fast the extruder will pull the filament out of the Bowden tube onwards through to the nozzle. This is typically in millimeters per second (mm/s). It is very simple really. The higher the overall setting, the faster will be the movement.

There is a tradeoff here though. And that is that you will need to get all of the filament strings out of the nozzle as quickly as possible. However the faster you do so, the greater will be the potential damage to the filament and ultimately your build.

How Do You Calculate Retraction Distance?

Retracting distance may be defined as the total amount of filament that the machine’s extruder will retract from its nozzle. Let us suppose the setting is set at 7 mm. Here, the extruder will be able to pull the requisite 7 mm of filament right out of the unit’s Bowden tube.

How Do You Stop The Stringing On Ender 3 Pro?

Once your Ender 3 is ready and able to push down more filaments into the nozzle, it will automatically move the same amount of filament (7mm) right back into the machine’s Bowden tube. This will lead to a momentary relief in pressure that can easily stop oozing and even prevent stringing.

Once the filament material is pushed back into the Bowden tube after its retraction, your printer will be prepared to print again. This whole exercise is also referred to as priming.

What Is A Good Retraction Distance?

As a general rule, it is a great idea to start off with low Cura settings such as 5 mm and only then proceed to adjust it either up or down by a maximum of 1 mm until you manage it just right. Your goal should always be to get it down to the lowest possible number even as you substantially reduce the stringing effect.

In this case, a reasonably good range would be 3 to 7 millimeters max. If the number is too low it won’t be able to have any reducing effect on stringing. Too high and it might damage your build and even increase your print time.

Extra Prime Amount

This setting will be of great help in compensating for any material that had been lost due to excessive oozing. Once your machine primes after retraction, it will automatically push the amount you have set beforehand

Maximum Retraction Count

This setting is used to adjust the total number of maximum retractions that may be possible in a specific area. Using this option will automatically protect your filament from damage by retracting and priming too many times. Since the extruder is using a gear with teeth that dig into the filament to push and pull it, the more your extruder retractions occur on one specific piece of filament, the more damage can occur.

Minimum Extrusion Distance Window

This window enables you to specify very precisely the length of filament on which you can enforce the ‘Maximum Retraction Count.’ For example, if you decide to set this count to a total of 5 while the Minimum Extrusion Distance Window (MEDW) is set to 10mm: In this case, the machine’s extruder will only allow a total of 5 retractions over a full 10mm piece of filament. In fact, all retraction commands will be ignored once the desired number has been reached.

Limit Support Retractions

This setting is available via a checkbox format. Once it is enabled, it will automatically stop all retractions whenever it is moving within its supports. It will still lead to a bit of stringing, but it will be restricted within the support structure only. You can verify it with a stringing test on various prints.

TPU Retraction Settings

  • Temp: 225
  • Print jerk: 10
  • Temp bed: 60
  • Retraction speed: 25m/s
  • First layer: 0.2
  • Retraction distance: 5mm
  • Print Acceleration: 300
  • Initial speed: 10m/s
  • Wall Acceleration: 300
  • Print speed: 25m/s

PLA Retraction Settings

  • Initial Layer Speed: 20 mm/s
  • Printing Temperature: 200 °C
  • Speed: 50 mm/s
  • Bed Temperature: 60 °C
  • Retraction: 6 mm @ 25 mm/s
  • Layer height: 0.12 mm
  • Initial Fan Speed: 0%
  • Infill: 20%

PETG Settings

  • Overall speed: Between 30 and 50 mm/s
  • Retraction Speed: At 40 mm/s or less
  • Retraction distance: Around 6 mm

ABS Settings

  • ABS: 6 mm retracting distance
  • Retraction Rate: St 40 mm per second

Related

Conclusion

All of the above settings can be used on the Ender 3 Cura profile and they can be further customized and tweaked to give optimal results.

Categories Ender 3Sours: https://makershop.co/ender-3-retraction-settings/

PETG Ultimate Filament Printing Guide [2021]

Your ultimate guide to printing in PETG

Standard Print Co. PETG Printing Guide
  • Your complete guide to 3D printing with PETG, covering best practices and tips for perfect prints.

  • How to succeed when printing PETG and troubleshooting common problems step-by-step

  • Download our free PETG Printing Guide, packed with printing tips and settings suggestions

  • Your PETG FAQ’s answered

PETG is a favourite in the world of 3D printing. PETG combines the best qualities of both PLA and ABS. Boasting the functionality and durability of ABS while retaining the printability of PLA, PETG is also great for mechanical applications due to its amazing layer adhesion, low warping and high impact-resistance. As an added bonus, PETG is both chemically resistant to salts, acids, alkalis, solvents, greases, oils and can be sterilised!

That being said, PETG does have some unique properties that make it slightly challenging to print for the uninitiated.

To help you, we’ve compiled a list of our 8 most helpful tips and tricks to help you master this versatile 3D printing material.

SLICER SETTINGS

Increase Z Offset

1. Increased Z Offset

Allow for an extra 0.02mm to 0.06 mm offset when printing in PETG. Unlike PLA and ABS, PETG doesn't perform well when it is squeezed onto the print bed. Failure to do so often causes the nozzle to skim over the material that has just been printed. This material accumulates before being deposited on the print as light strings or globs that solidify and increase the chance of your nozzle colliding with the print. Small holes can also form on the skin of your print where material has been picked up by the nozzle.

Proper Temperature

2. Proper Temperatre Control

PETG is prone to stringing and oozing. When printing PETG start with the lowest suggested temperature recommended by your filament manufacturer. For Standard Print Co. PETG we recommend printing at 220°C and increasing the print temperature only if extrusion problems become evident. A bed temp of between 70°C - 80°C is recommended. Print the first two layers with the bed at 80°C if possible. Should adhesion problems occur, try using blue painter's tape or hairspray.

Proper Fan Control

3. Proper Fan Control

Rapid cooling of the molten filament by increasing fan speed will ensure a clean, crisp print. A fan speed of 100% can be used to ensure the best surface resolution possible when printing PETG. If a strong print is what you are after, disabling your fan and setting the fan speed to 0% will ensure your print has great interlayer adhesion. Be careful though as this may come at the cost of surface resolution. We recommend starting at 40% and increasing as necessary.

Retraction

4. Retraction

Increasing the retraction speed and distance will decrease that amount of material that oozes out of the nozzle between print moves. Turning on retraction settings in your slicer will tell your printer to actively rewind some filament at the end of a print move, causing a negative pressure to build up in the nozzle. We recommend starting with a retraction speed of between 30-80mm/s and a retraction distance of between 2-5 mm for a Bowden setup or 1-2mm for a direct drive printer.

Print Slower

5. Print Slower

If you are having problems with interlayer adhesion or print quality, try printing a little slower. We've found that printing at 55mm/s or slower yields great results. Printing at speeds greater than 60mm/s and your printer may struggle to lay filament down fast enough. Layers may have problems sticking to one another and in more extreme cases, causing blobs, zits, stringing and holes in the print.

Flow Control

6. Flow Control

PETG is sensitive to over extrusion. If you've tried all the steps outlined above and you're getting excessive stringing/blobbing, the problem may be linked to over extrusion. This occurs when the printer extrudes more filament than intended, causing sloppy layers and excessive material to build up on the hot end.

To remedy this issue, simply reduce the flow of filament in 5% increments to check that the filament is extruding correctly and not over extruding. Convlersley if you are getting thin, wispy layers that aren’t adhering properly, you may be underextruding. To remedy this issue, dial up your flow rate in 5% increments.

Unload Filament

7. Unload Filament

Whenever possible, when not printing with PETG (and all other filaments for that matter), unload the filament from the printer and store it in an airtight container in a cool dry place to keep it dry. Ensure the desiccant that comes with the filament is also stored in the same container to keep the filament in optimal printing condition.

Keep Filament Dry.png

8. Keep Filament Dry

PETG is prone to absorbing moisture from the air when left out (being hygroscopic) and hydrolyses when wet, resulting in weaker interlayer bonding on the molecular level. Wet filament can be rescued by dehydration in an oven at 60°c for a minimum of 6 hours or by storing the filament in a container with ample amounts of desiccant for a minimum of 24 hours.

Problem: Poor Bed Adhesion

Level Bed

First check if your bed is manually level as per your printer's instruction manual. An uneven bed is usually the most common culprit when it comes to poor part adhesion.

Print with a brim

Printing with the brim option turned on increases the total surface area of the first layer. This increased surface area results in increased adhesion to the bed, which is often enough to keep the corners of your print stuck down. This minimises corners lifting and helps keep the print stuck onto the bed.

Increase bed temperature

After leaving the nozzle, molten filament solidifies. As it cools, it contracts along the lateral surfaces. This contraction in turn causes stress, pulling the edges inwards. Increasing the heat bed temperature allows printed layers to cool slowly decreasing the amount of contraction experienced at the base of your printed model. We recommend printing PETG with the heat bed temperature at around 70-80°C. If you have the ability to do so, printing the first two layers slightly hotter (80°C) will aid in print adhesion.

Decrease Fan Speed for first few layers

Lowering the fan speed or setting fan speed to 0% for the first few layers will ensure the molten filament has more time to flow and conform onto the surface of your print bed, aiding in adhesion.

Clean print bed

Loose debris such as dust or un-removed support material from previous prints inevitably coat the surface of your print bed over time. While these generally don’t present a problem in small quantities, they can pose a problem with adhesion if allowed to build up as they can prevent your first later from properly adhering with the build plate. A quick wipe of glass build surfaces with common, household glass cleaners (ammonia based) like Windex can be an effective way of removing print residue. For build surfaces such as PEI build surfaces, a light sand with 600+ grit sandpaper can remove any protruding debris, gently roughing up the surface of the PEI and greatly aiding in adhesion. For other advanced, composite build surfaces such as our Ziflex build surfaces or the stock build surfaces on printers such as our Creality CRX and CR-10 PRO’s a light scrape with the scraper supplied is often enough to removing stubborn, stuck on debris. When faced with even more stubborn, melted on 3D print material that simply won’t budge, printing a 1- or 2-layer thick sheet, the size and shape of the printer’s entire build plate in a material like PETG can do the trick. After printing, allow the sheet to cool and peel off the sheet along with the offending debris (now stuck onto the 3D printed sheet).

Temporary adhesives

If you’re looking for a more temporary solution or are just in a pinch and need something to stick to the build plate, there are a few temporary solutions to the problem:

  • Painters Tape: Blue painters tape can serve as a great temporary solution to increase your part’s adhesion to the build plate. It’s easily applied and even easier to remove after a print. Be sure to stick your tape down evenly, ensuring that there are no overlaps in the tape that could cause high spots in your otherwise level build plate.

  • Hairspray: A light spray of hairspray on the build plate is a popular method of aiding adhesion to the bed. We’re not a fan of this method as after a few prints, a build-up of solid hairspray can accumulate on the bed and it’s tricky to clean. With the advent of heated build plates on most printers, the need for hairspray has decreased but sometimes it may just be the only thing at hand when you’re in a pinch.

Print bed upgrades

If your printer is not equipped with a PEI coated build surface (or similar) and instead comes with an aluminium or glass print bed out of the box, you may consider upgrading to a composite build surface such as our Ziflex build surface for a more permanent fix to the problem. Coated print surfaces are designed to make your prints stick when hot and release when cool. While smooth print surfaces such as glass and aluminium are great for removing prints once they are done, but their smooth surfaces present an issue when you really need your print to stick when printing.

3D Printing Problem Checklist: Poor Bed Adhesion

  • Level bed

  • Print with a brim

  • Increase bed temperature

  • Decrease fan speed for initial layers

  • Clean bed

  • Temporary adhesives

  • Print bed upgrades

Problem: Nozzle-Part Collision

Increase Z offset

PETG has great interlayer adhesion, making for super durable prints. Unfortunately unlike PLA and ABS, it needs a little extra room to be gently “lain” down on the preceding layer as opposed to being “squeezed down”. When a Z offset is too low and the filament is squeezed onto the preceding layer (or bed), the nozzle often skims over what it has previously lain down, accumulating molten material around the nozzle that is eventually deposited onto the print. In most cases the nozzle is hot enough and the obstruction small enough that the hot nozzle simply passes through the obstruction, melting it as it passes through. If the obstruction is too large however, a collision may take place that completely dislodges the part from the bed or worse - damage the printer. Try increasing the Z offset in 0.02mm increments.


Decrease Draughts/Increase Ambient Temperature

After leaving the nozzle, molten filament solidifies. As it cools, it contracts along the lateral surfaces. This contraction in turn causes stress, pulling the edges inwards and causing prints to warp. This warping can be especially pronounced on long, unsupported, parts of 3D models. When warping occurs on these sorts of parts, it often occurs in a more pronounced manner, presenting a high risk of collision with the nozzle. Slowing the rate at which the model cools by placing the 3D printer in an enclosure is usually the most effective remedy for this problem. Failing that, ensuring that the printer is printing in a warm area free of draughts will ensure a slow and consistent cooling rate for your 3D prints and decrease the amount of warping experienced. Generally as a rule of thumb, most materials other than PLA will benefit from warmer ambient temperatures and higher enclosure temperatures. In the case of PETG, we recommend enclosing printers to keep as much heat in as possible.

Manual Support Generation

See above. Strategic placement of support material below such parts of your 3D print may be one of your best tools to combat collisions. Most slicers have a manual support generation function which allow you to manually generate and place supports in problem areas.

3D Printing Problem Checklist: Nozzle Part Collision

  • Increase Z offset

  • Eliminate draughts/increase ambient temperature

  • Generate manual supports

Problem: Stringing

Increase Z offset

PETG has great interlayer adhesion, making for super durable prints. Unfortunately unlike PLA and ABS, it needs a little extra room to be gently “lain” down on the preceding layer as opposed to being “squeezed down”. When a Z offset is too low and the filament is squeezed onto the preceding layer (or bed), the nozzle often skims over what it has previously lain down, accumulating molten material around the nozzle. This molten blob then makes its way down onto the model at the end of a print move where it sticks both to the print and the nozzle. As the nozzle moves, this molten blob stretches, forming light PETG “strings”. We suggest increasing the Z offset in your slicer by 0.02mm over your usual PLA/ABS print settings. If problem persists, increase Z offset in 0.02mm increments to a recommended maximum of 0.06mm.

Decrease Nozzle Temperature

Molten PETG at higher temperatures has a lower viscosity than at lower temperatures. Lowering the print temperature makes the molten PETG less “runny” and can decrease the amount of filament that oozes out between print moves. Start printing at the lowest recommended printing temperature indicated for your filament, increasing the print temperature only if the printer struggles to extrude the filament. Signs that you may need to increase the nozzle temperature can include your extruder gears grinding, slipping or filament failing to extrude from the nozzle.

Increase Fan Speed

Rapid cooling of the molten filament by increasing fan speed will ensure a clean, crisp print should you require better surface resolution at the cost of interlayer adhesion. A fan speed of 100% can be used to ensure the best surface resolution possible.

Increase travel speed

When a nozzle is at printing temperature, molten plastic filament will inevitably begin to slowly ooze out. This isn’t a problem until a nozzle is travelling between print layers in what’s called a travel move. A method for compensating for this is by increasing the travel speed and decreasing the amount of time that molten filament has to flow out of the nozzle between moves. Begin by entering a ludicrously high number (9999mm/s) in your slicer to find out the maximum allowable travel speed that your printer will allow and work with a value 20% lower than this value. This will provide a great balance between the long-term reliability of your printer as well as minimising the amount of filament oozing out.

Increase retraction speed and distance

Increasing the retraction speed and distance will decrease that amount of material that oozes out of the nozzle. Turning on retraction settings in your slicer will tell your printer to actively rewind some filament at the end of a print move, causing a negative pressure to build up in the nozzle. This encourages less filament to ooze out upon the completion of a print move. Begin at the lowest recommended setting and adjust in 10mm/s increments for retraction speed and 0.2mm increments for retraction distance. NOTE: Retraction distance does vary depending on the type of feeding system your printer uses: Bowden or direct drive. Don’t know what your printer has? Pay close attention to where the feeder gears are in relation to the hot end. If the feeder gears are right next to your hot end, you’ve got a direct drive printer. If there is some distance between your feeder gears and the hot end - seperated by a tube - you’ve got yourself a Bowden setup. Adjust your retraction distances accordingly using the figures below.


Retraction Speed:      30-80mm/s
Retraction Distance: Bowden: 2 - 5mm
                                 Direct: 1 - 2mm

3D Printing Problem Checklist: Stringing

  • Increase Z offset

  • Decrease nozzle temperature

  • Increase fan speed

  • Increase travel speed

  • Increase retraction speed and distance

Problem: Zits And Blobs

Increase the Z-offset

PETG has great interlayer adhesion, making for super durable prints. Unfortunately unlike PLA and ABS, it needs a little extra room to be gently “lain” down on the preceding layer as opposed to being “squeezed down”. When a Z offset is too low and the filament is squeezed onto the preceding layer (or bed), the nozzle often skims over what it has previously lain down, accumulating molten material around the nozzle. In major cases, this accumulated blob of molten PETG is deposited on the layer being printed causing an unsightly “Zit”, marring an otherwise smooth layer. We suggest increasing the Z offset in your slicer by 0.02mm over your usual PLA/ABS print settings. If problem persists, increase Z offset in 0.02mm increments to a recommended maximum of 0.06mm.

Decrease the Flow

PETG is sensitive to overextrusion. If you've tried all the steps outlined above and you're getting excessive stringing/blobing, the problem may be linked to overextrusion. Try reducing the flow of filament in 5% incriments and check that the filament is extruding correctly and not overextruding. You should start to see a decrease in the amount of stringing, blobing and prinitng of unwanted artifacts on your model. Try printing a calibration cube with your new reduced flow settings to check that the flow has not beed decreased too much.

3D Printing Problem Checklist: Zits and Blobs

  • Increase Z Offset

  • Decrease Flow

Problem: Holes In Print

Increase Z offset

PETG has great interlayer adhesion, making for super durable prints. Unfortunately unlike PLA and ABS, it needs a little extra room to be gently “lain” down on the preceding layer as opposed to being “squeezed down”. When a Z offset is too low and the filament is squeezed onto the preceding layer (or bed), the nozzle often skims over what it has previously lain down, accumulating molten material around the nozzle. In major cases, this accumulated blob of molten PETG can even pull up the molten plastic that has just been laid down, causing a small hole to appear on the surface of a print. The creation of these holes is closely linked to print speed. An improper Z offset height coupled with a print speed that is too fast can increase the likelihood of holes forming in the skin of a print. We suggest increasing the Z offset in your slicer by 0.02mm over your usual PLA/ABS print settings. If problem persists, increase Z offset in 0.02mm increments to a recommended maximum of 0.06mm.

Decrease print speed

The creation of these holes is closely linked to a problem with the Z offset being too low. See above. 55mm/s represents the upper limit of recommended print speed when printing in PETG. We’d recommend starting at 55mm/s and decreasing print speed in 5mm/s increments. We find 35mm/s print speed yields great results.

3D Printing Problem Checklist: Holes In Print

  • Increase Z offset

  • Decrease print speed

Problem: Elephant’s Foot

Level Heat Bed

Closely related to warping, elephant’s foot occurs when the bottom of a 3D print splays out at the point where it contacts the heat bed. Rather than being related to any single issue, elephant’s footing is usually the result of a combination of factors. To resolve this issue, we recommend addressing the problem using this solution, in conjunction with the two listed below. Before altering any slicer settings, we recommend first checking that your printer is in the optimal condition for printing. Elephant’s foot is often caused when molten filament is “squeezed” onto the heat bed instead of being deposited evenly. This causes the filament to escape in the only manner than it can - by squeezing out in the X and Y axis. Ensuring your printer’s bed is level before printing is often the first and easiest fix for solving elephant’s footing.

Increase Z Offset

Increase the Z offset gives the filament more room to be deposited in an even manner, allowing it to cool in the desired shape without compressing the print on the Z axis. We suggest increasing the Z offset in your slicer by 0.02mm over and above your usual PLA/ABS print settings. If problem persists, increase Z offset in 0.02mm increments to a recommended maximum of 0.06mm.

Decrease Heat Bed Temperature

As your printer prints, layers of filament are deposited, one atop of another. Should the heated be too hot, the first few printed layers may not have enough time to cool and fully solidify before the subsequent layers are added. If this is the case, as the printer continues to print, the added weight of subsequent layers may cause the still soft layers of your print to deform and bulge outward, resulting in the characteristic shape of an elephant’s foot. To prevent this, decrease your printer’s heat bed temperature by increments of 5°C until the issue is resolved. If you have decreased the heat bed temperature to a point where part adhesion becomes an issue, (roughly 20°C below the filament’s recommended print bed temperature) the printer’s bed temperature may not be the problem.

3D Printing Problem Checklist: Elephant’s Foot

  • Level Heat Bed

  • Increase Z offset

  • Decrease Het Bed Temperature

Problem: Print Warping Around Edges

Use a heated print bed

Most printers of the current generation come with a heated build plate. During a print the print bed is heated to a point just below the melting point of the material being printed - the material’s “glass transition temperature”. While the glass transition temperature of PETG is generally 80°C, this temperature may vary from manufacturer to manufacturer. Standard Print Co. PETG has a glass transition temperature of 80°C.

Print with a brim

Printing with the brim option turned on increases the total surface area of the first layer. This increased surface area results in increased adhesion to the bed, which is often enough to keep the corners of your print stuck down. This minimises corners lifting and helps keep the print stuck onto the bed.

Eliminate Draughts/Increase Ambient Temperature

After leaving the nozzle, molten filament solidifies as it cools. As it cools, it contracts along the lateral surfaces. This contraction in turn causes stress, pulling the edges inwards. Slowing the rate at which the model cools by placing the 3D printer in an enclosure is usually the most effective remedy for this problem. Failing that, ensuring that the printer is printing in a warm area free of draughts will ensure a slow and consistent cooling rate for your 3D prints and decrease the amount of warping experienced. This means relocating your printer out of high traffic areas such as large open rooms or areas that may see lots of opening or closing of doors. Generally, most materials other than PLA will benefit from warmer ambient temperatures and higher enclosure temperatures. In the case of PETG, we recommend enclosing printers to keep as much heat in as possible.

Allow heat bed to heat up completely

Another common problem linked to warping is uneven heating of the heat bed. While most 3D printers come with heated build plates, it’s important to note that the heating element doesn’t always span the full size of the heat bed.
The position of the hearing element is also important as most printers are designed with the heating elements located at the centre of the heat bed. Add a thicker than usual build plate made of glass or aluminium into the mix and more often than not, your printer’s thermometer may often be indicating that it has come up to full temperature when in fact the sides and surface has yet to do so. It’s therefore important to let the bed come to temperature by allowing the bed (but not the nozzle) to hold at printing temperature for at least 10 mins before beginning a print.

Temporary adhesives

If you’re looking for a more temporary solution or are just in a pinch and need something to stick to the build plate, there are a few temporary solutions to the problem:

  • Painters Tape: Blue painters tape can serve as a great temporary solution to increase your part’s adhesion to the build plate. It’s easily applied and even easier to remove after a print. Be sure to stick your tape down evenly, ensuring that there are no overlaps in the tape that could cause high spots in your otherwise level build plate.

  • Hairspray: A light spray of hairspray on the build plate is a popular method of aiding adhesion to the bed. We’re not a fan of this method as after a few prints, a build-up of solid hairspray can accumulate on the bed and it’s tricky to clean. With the advent of heated build plates on most printers, the need for hairspray has decreased but sometimes it may just be the only thing at hand when you’re in a pinch.

Increase bed temperature

After leaving the nozzle, molten filament solidifies. As it cools, it contracts along the lateral surfaces. This contraction in turn causes stress, pulling the edges inwards. Increasing the heat bed temperature allows printed layers to cool slowly decreasing the amount of contraction experienced at the base of your printed model. We recommend printing PETG with the heat bed temperature at around 70-75°C. If you have the ability to do so, printing the first two layers slightly hotter (80°C) will aid in print adhesion. (80°C)

3D Printing Problem Checklist: Warping around edges

  • Use a heated print bed

  • Print with a brim (increase surface contact area)

  • Eliminate Draughts/Increase Ambient Temperature

  • Allow heat bed to heat up completely

  • Use a temporary adhesive

  • Increase bed temperature

Problem: Poor Part Strength

Dry Your Filament

PETG is prone absorbing moisture from the air when left out (being hygroscopic) and hydrolyses when wet, resulting in weaker interlayer bonding on the molecular level. All things held equal, when used for printing, “wet” filament will always produce a mechanically weaker 3D printed part than “dry” filament. Keeping the filament dry in a sealed container with desiccant is integral for printing strong 3D printed parts. Whenever possible, when not printing with PETG (and all other filaments for that matter), unload the filament from the printer and store it in an airtight container in a cool dry place away from UV light. Ensure the desiccant that comes with the filament is also stored in the same container to keep the filament in optimal printing condition. Wet filament can be rescued by dehydration. This can be done by dehydrating the filament in a dehydration oven at 60°c for a minimum of 6 hours or by storing the filament in a container with ample amounts of desiccant for a minimum of 24 hours.

Decrease Fan speed

Slow cooling of the molten filament by decreasing fan speed to 0% will result in the strongest print possible. This will often come at the cost of surface resolution and detail. We suggest starting at 0% fan speed and increasing it in 10% increments until you find your desired balance of surface resolution vs print durability.

Reorient Print

The weakest part of a FDM 3D print will always occur between layers as opposed to along them. With that in mind, part strength can often be increased by simply reorienting your part when slicing.

3D Printing Problem Checklist: Poor Part Strength

  • Dry your filament

  • Decrease Fan Speed

  • Reorient Print

Problem: Print Stuck Onto Bed

Wait for part to cool

As plastic cools, it contracts on its own. This can often cause enough shrinkage at the base of the print to have it pop right off.

Use a paint scraper

Most 3D printers come with one of these right out of the box. If your printer didn’t come with one, they are available from most good hardware stores. If you’ve let your print bed cool down but your print is still stuck tight, try carefully positioning your paint scraper under a corner of your print to prise it from the bed. Ensure that you relevel your print bed after using this method to ensure it is level again.

Heat Up Print Bed

Warming up your bed to the glass transition temperature of your 3D printed part can aid in removal of the part. Using a scraper, carefully manoeuvre your scraper under the sharpest corner of your print, (if it has corners) making sure to not damage your part.

Use A Release Agent

PETG is known to stick so well on bare glass that it’s been known to take chunks of the heat bed along with it when removing prints. If this is happening or if you are having trouble removing prints from a glass printed, try letting the build surface come to room temperature before attempting to remove the print.

  • Hairspray: To aid in print removal give your print bed a light spray of unscented hairspray before printing. The hairspray serves as an intermediate agent that sits between the print and the build surface. This will aid with both initial first layer adhesion as well as acting as a release agent when the print has completed. Ensure your hairspray contains plenty of vinyl, acetate and copolymer for best results.

  • Painters Tape: Blue painters’ tape can serve as a great temporary solution to increase your part’s adhesion to the build plate as well as making it easy to remove your printed part when you’re done. It’s easily applied and even easier to remove after a print. Be sure to stick your tape down evenly, ensuring that there are no overlaps in the tape that could cause high spots in your otherwise level build plate.

Clean your print bed

A build-up of glue or hairspray may cause prints to stick to the bed too well. Periodic cleaning of your print bed with water (if you use glue) or with a cloth and isopropyl alcohol (if using hairspray) between prints will ensure your bed stays free of any unintended build-ups of adhesive.

Print bed upgrades

If your printer is not equipped with a PEI coated build surface (or similar) and instead comes with an aluminium or glass print bed out of the box, you may consider upgrading to a composite build surface such as our Ziflex build surface for a more permanent fix to the problem. Coated print surfaces are designed to make your prints stick when hot and release when cool. While smooth print surfaces such as glass and aluminium are great for removing prints once they are done, but their smooth surfaces present an issue when you really need your print to stick when printing.

3D Printing Problem Checklist: Print Stuck to Print Bed

  • Wait for part to cool

  • Use a paint scraper

  • Heat up print bed

  • Use a releasing agent

  • Clean your print bed

  • Print Bed Upgrades

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Find the guide above useful? Download your very own copy of our PETG Printing guide for FREE now!

  • Waste less filament on failed prints.

  • Spend less time tinkering with your printer in search of the “perfect settings”

  • Gain the confidence to print for longer

  • Expert advice with simple explanations

PETG Print Guide Download

+ What is the glass transition temperature of Standard Print Co. PETG?

The glass transition temperature of our PETG is 80°C. You can find this information and more on our PETG Filament Performance Datasheet.

+ Does Standard Print Co. PETG come in Transparent or semi-transparent colours?

No, only our PETG Natural 1.75mm is semi-transprent. All other colours are opaque. Transparent PETG is available but on a made to order basis. If you're after 2.85mm filament, please get in touch with us via the chat button on the bottom right hand corner of your screen. Minimum order quantities of 10kg apply.

+ Do you offer PETG in 2.85mm diameter filament?

Yes. To view our 2.85mm PETG range, click here.

Don’t see your question above? Got a great tip that wasn’t in the guide above? Post your question in the comments section below and we’ll try our best to answer it.

Sours: https://standardprintco.com/read/2020/11/15/petg-filament-printing-guide-how-to-succeed-printing-petg-and-troubleshooting-common-problems-step-by-step

Settings petg retraction

Retraction: Just say "No" to oozing

Perhaps the most common question we get from new 3D printer owners is, “How do I get rid of oozing and stringing on my prints?”

Extruding thermoplastic is a complicated process with dozens of variables in play. However, understanding what causes oozing/stringing on your prints doesn’t have to be that complicated.

What is Retraction?

First, let’s start with the most common misconception about what retraction does and how it works.

Myth - Retraction “sucks” filament back up through the hot end.  So, the more retraction you use, the less oozing you’ll get.  

Fact – Once filament has melted in the “melt zone” of your hot end, it cannot be retracted. Retraction does not create negative pressure. Hot ends are not sealed/airtight. If they were, then the negative pressure would “suck” molten filament back up through the hot end. This would likely lead to lots of jams and other extrusion issues, but this is not the case.

Think about candle wax. If you were to put a small cylinder of wax into a pool of melted candle wax and then pull it out, would the melted wax come with it? Of course not. While a small amount of wax will stick to the cylinder when you remove it, it does not pull the pool of molten wax up with it.

In the same way, the solid filament above the melt zone does not retract the molten filament with it.

Ok, so if retraction doesn’t pull filament back up through the nozzle, what does it do?

The purpose of retraction is simply to relieve pressure from the melt zone so that filament isn’t being forced through the nozzle during non-print moves.

What are the Best Retraction Settings?

There is a lot of misinformation out there about how much retraction you should have. I’ve seen recommendations from .1mm all the way up to 20mm. So what is the correct amount?

The correct amount is the minimum amount required to reduce the most stringing on your part. Some machines and hot ends require more retraction than others, and each material has different requirements. In general, though, it’s unlikely you should need more than 5mm or less than 1mm.

Settings to Tune

There are a few other important settings that affect oozing/stringing on parts. We’ll go through the process of adjusting your machine to get the least amount of oozing possible, but it’s critically important that you start out with a properly calibrated extruder. If you haven’t calibrated your extruder before, read this before you start adjusting retraction settings.

There are only 2 settings we’ll be adjusting for retraction in this article:

  • Retraction: Length on Move
  • Speed: Travel (speed for non-Print moves)

 

There are certainly other settings that affect oozing, but these are the most important, and the easiest to test and adjust. We'll cover the other settings in a future article.

We created a simple STL (Download the file here) to show the effects of different settings on oozing/stringing. They are 10mm cubes and they are spaced 10mm, 20mm, and 40mm apart. The test machine was a SeeMeCNC Rostock Max with an E3D v6 hot end. The filament used was MatterHackers standard blue PLA.

These settings were used for all test prints:

  • Layer Height: 0.25mm 
  • Infill: 25% - Triangle 
  • Perimeters: 2
  • Solid Top Layers: 2
  • Solid Bottom Layers: 2
  • Infill and Perimeter Speeds: 40mm/s
  • All parts were printed with a skirt, but the skirt was removed for some of the pictures in order to more clearly visualize the oozing/stringing

Start Dialing in the Settings 

This print had 0 retraction and 40mm/s travel speed (non-print moves). This represents about the worst oozing/stringing possible on this machine

 


You’ll notice that the stringing between the 20 and 40mm gaps are much worse than the 10mm. This is simply because there’s more time for filament to ooze out of the hot end. This is why travel speed for non-print moves plays a big part in oozing/stringing. The faster you’re able to move to the next print position, the less time there is for filament to ooze from the hot end.

With this as the starting point, the first thing to do is to increase the travel speed of non-print moves. Every machine has different limitations, but 150-250mm/s is the likely the range your machine can handle well. There really won’t be a noticeable difference in stringing between 150 and 250mm/s because of acceleration and other limits in the firmware, but that’s for another article.

This print had 0 retraction, but the travel speed was increased from 40mm/s to 150mm/s. 


It’s better than the previous print, but clearly not acceptable.

Once the travel speed is set, we’ll increase the retraction distance. Again, the goal is to use the minimum amount of retraction necessary. Using more than necessary can cause jams, blobs, and other extrusion related issues.

This print has 1mm retraction with 150mm/s travel speed:


There is clear improvement – especially in the 10mm gap - but still a lot of stringing between parts

 Next, 2mm retraction, 150mm/s travel speed:


Just about right. There are a few very, very fine strands of PLA which you may not even be able to see in the picture, but the edges and faces are all very clean with no blobs or excess filament to speak of.

We’re not done yet, though. We’ll increase the retraction to 3mm to see if there is any noticeable improvement.

3mm retraction, 150mm/s travel speed

Perfect! No stringing, no oozing. Just perfectly printed cubes.

So, it looks like 3mm is the right amount of retraction for PLA on this machine.

To quickly and easily tune your settings to achieve optimal retraction, download the cube retraction print here, and print it with your current settings. 

Based on your results, adjust either the travel speed or the retraction distance and reprint. Only change 1 setting at a time. That way, you can easily see the effect of each change.

Adjust your retraction distance up/down by either 0.5 or 1mm increments. We don't recommend distances greater than 5mm, or less than 0.5mm.

Lastly, you may need to perform this test and adjust for different materials. Some materials may ooze more than others, and may require increased retraction distance & travel speed to achieve the same results.

Happy Ooze-Free Printing!

 

Sours: https://www.matterhackers.com/articles/retraction-just-say-no-to-oozing
PETG Blobs and Stringing, my best Solution!

When it comes to 3D printing with PETG, it does take some knowledge and practice to get good quality models. It’s not too difficult when you follow the right methods, so I decided to write this article to show users how to get good-looking PETG prints.

To 3D print PETG, you should use a printing temperature between 235-250°C and a bed temperature between 70-100°C for the best results. Your cooling fan should be at 100%, with a print speed of 40-60mm/s. Also, PETG absorbs moisture easily so, keep it dry in an airtight container when not in use.

This article is a simple yet in-depth guide on how to 3D print PETG filament just like the pros do, so stick around to see how it’s done and get your questions answered.

What is PETG Filament?

PETG or Polyethylene Terephthalate Glycol, is a popular thermoplastic polyester. PETG is different from the popular PET plastics. It is a glycol-modified variant of PET which leads to greater strength, impact resistance, and heat resistance. Common products made from PETG are water bottles and food containers.

It is widely used in different manufacturing industries due to its excellent formability, chemical resistance, high strength, and other excellent physical properties.

As a 3D printing filament, PETG is fast becoming the filament of choice for most 3D printing enthusiasts. This is because PETG prints display high strength, they are less prone to warping, and they have smooth and glossy surface finishes.

Also, PETG filament does not produce toxic odors like other thermoplastic filaments during printing. Furthermore, it is ductile, waterproof, and displays very little shrinkage, which makes it ideal for flat surfaces and models with low tolerances.

What Printing & Bed Temperature Should You Print PETG?

Printing temperatures for PETG filaments usually fall within the 235°C to 250°C range. Temperatures hotter or cooler than this can lead to stringing, blocked nozzles, over extrusion, etc. A heated bed isn’t necessary for small PETG prints, but for larger flat prints, a heated bed at 70-100°C is ideal.

Print temperatures can vary within the ranges given above for different brands of filaments. For the best results, always use the temperature values supplied by the filament manufacturers and adjust the settings if needed.

Here are some of the popular filaments on the market and their printing temperatures.

Overture PETG

  • Recommended Extrusion/Nozzle Temp: 230°C – 250°C
  • Heated Bed Temp: 80°C – 90°

Hatchbox PETG

  • Recommended Extrusion/Nozzle Temperature: 230°C – 260°C
  • Heated Bed Temp: 80°C – 100°C

TecBears PETG

  • Recommended Extrusion/Nozzle Temperature 220°C – 250°C
  • Heated Bed Temp: 70°C – 80°C

Another less glamorous way you can determine the ideal temperature for your filament is through old-fashioned trial and error. Calibration prints like the temperature tower can help in figuring out the proper settings for the filament.

Here’s how you can print one using Cura.

What Print Speed Should I Use for PETG Filament?

The final quality of the PETG model heavily depends on the print speed. Most users and manufacturers recommend a printing speed between 30 and 60mm/s for the best results.

Printing too fast above the recommended speed can lead to low-quality prints with many defects. So, it’s better to put a cap on the maximum printing speed to get quality prints.

On the other end of the spectrum, printing at a slow pace is good for first-layer adhesion and great print quality. However, below a certain point, slow printing speeds can also lead to print defects like stringing and oozing.

Lastly, one thing to note is that the optimal printing speed can vary between printers and filament brands. To get the best results, you should probably experiment with the settings to find the sweet spot.

Also, the printing speed should factor in the type of model being printed. For models with curved or complex geometries, a lower printing speed will probably be better.

Does PETG Need Cooling?

PETG filament does not necessarily need part cooling, but the cooling helps immensely with the final model quality. Your rate of cooling should be high to reduce print defects and stringing, while low cooling (30-50%) is better for strength due to better layer adhesion from previous layers melting into each other.

When deciding a cooling rate, you should choose one based on the purpose of the final part. The rate of cooling determines how well or beautiful the final model turns out.

When the cooling rate is high (70-100%), it helps to eliminate print defects and stringing, and the model’s details are rendered in great detail.

So, when deciding the cooling rate to use, you have to balance between aesthetic and functional value. Parts cooled faster will have a better surface finish and look, but they will not be as strong and durable as those done with lesser cooling.

Note: It’s good practice to print the first few layers without cooling to enhance first layer adhesion.

What Are the Best PETG Retraction Settings?

Retraction settings for PETG are very different from those for other filaments. This is because PETG prints at a relatively high temperature so, the material flow is very hard to stop and control.

The optimal retraction speed for PETG is relatively low, around 35-40mm/s, for both Bowden and Direct Drive extruders. The optimal retraction distance is between 5-7mm for Bowden extruders and 2-4mm for direct-drive extruders. Good retraction settings can help to avoid stringing, nozzle clogs and jams, etc.

To get the exact settings for your printer, you can experiment using a retraction tower to see what works best. You can check out how to do that in the video below.

Best Cura PETG Settings for 3D Printing

Ultimaker Cura is one of the most popular slicing software out there. Many users like and use it because of the number of features and functionality it offers at every user’s favorite price point, Free.

To slice and print your PETG 3D model using Cura, you’ll need the correct material settings for PETG. Luckily, the Cura software comes with a default material profile for printing PETG.

Here’s how you can activate it:

Step 1: Open the Cura software and click on the Material drop-down menu in the top toolbar.

Step 2: Click on the button to the right of the “Material” icon.

Step 3: In the menu that appears, hover your cursor over ‘Generic” and choose “PETG” from the menu.

Step 4: You can choose the type of print quality you want in terms of layer height. You can choose between:

  • Standard Quality (0.12mm)
  • Dynamic Quality (0.16mm)
  • Super Quality (0.2mm)
  • Low Quality (0.28mm)

Step 5: You can check out the default print settings on the main interface. You can also tweak or customize any value you want.

Using the default profile can be a time-saver for some. But in case you want to get straight into printing, you can use these custom settings. These settings have been tried and vetted by many 3D printing enthusiasts as the optimal settings for printing PETG.

Let’s have a look at them.

Best Cura PETG Settings

  • Nozzle Temperature: 235-250°C
  • Bed Temperature: 70-100°C
  • Print Speed: 40-60mm/s
  • Initial Layer Print Speed: 20mm/s
  • Retraction Distance: 6mm (Bowden setups), 2-3mm (direct drive setups)
  • Retraction Speed: 40-45mm/s
  • Combing: “Not in Skin” or “Within Infill”
  • Cooling Fan Speed: 0-50% for strength, 50-100% for quality
  • Initial Layer Cooling Speed: 0%
  • Build Plate Adhesion: Raft or Brim

Is PETG Filament Toxic & Safe to 3D Print Indoor?

No, PETG filament is non-toxic, and it can be printed safely indoors. Also, it doesn’t even emit any smell when it is printing. Just make sure your 3D printing area is well ventilated to avoid a buildup of nanoparticles in the air. These particles can cause eye and throat irritations.

Is PETG Heat Resistant? What Temperature Can PETG Withstand?

PETG has decent heat resistance properties, especially when compared to most other filaments. It can resist temperatures up to its glass transition temperature, which is around 80-85⁰C. It handily beats out filaments like PLA in this respect, but it displays less heat resistance than ABS.

However, it is more UV resistant than both of them, making it the perfect choice for outdoor applications.

Can You 3D Print PETG on a Glass Bed?

Yes, you can print PETG on a glass bed. PETG adheres well to the glass surface. Sometimes, it can even stick too well to the glass surface, making it hard to remove. In some extreme cases, removing it can even take out chunks of the glass plate.

To help you avoid this, I’ll cover how to safely remove PETG prints from a glass bed in a later section.

Can You 3D Print PETG Without a Heated Bed or Enclosure?

You can 3D print PETG without a heated bed, but it is recommended to have an active heated bed for the best results. A heated bed helps reduce the chances of your PETG prints warping and curling around the edges. It also gives much better first layer adhesion, which is the main foundation of all 3D prints.

How to Fix PETG Not Sticking to the Bed – Improve Bed Adhesion

Several issues can cause poor first layer adhesion when printing PETG. It can be due to problems in the printer’s set up like a dirty and poorly leveled print bed, print settings, or even poor filament quality.

To fix these, let’s run through a couple of solutions that will get your printer up and running in no time.

  • Make sure your print bed is clean and free from debris and leftover print materials.
  • Buy quality filament and ensure you keep it in a dry place where it cannot absorb moisture. PETG filament is hygroscopic, and moisture can ruin it.
  • Make sure you level the print bed properly, leaving an appropriate Z- offset of 0.2 to 0.3mm between the bed and the nozzle. You can use three slices of paper or a thick card to get the distance right.
  • To help the first layer adhere well to the bed, you can use glue sticks, hairspray, or printer tape. Some users even combine some of them to get better results.
  • Turn off fan cooling, turn down the speed, and print the first layer slowly while using a heated bed.
  • Check the nozzle and the print bed’s temperature to make sure they are within the range specified by the manufacturer. It’s usually between 210⁰C to 260⁰C for the hot end and 70⁰C to 90⁰C for the bed.

How to Fix PETG Stuck to Glass Bed

To fix PETG filament stuck to a glass bed, you can try alternating between hot and cold environments to loosen the material by heating the bed up or putting the glass bed in your freezer. You shouldn’t directly print PETG on a glass bed, but rather coat the bed with a layer of glue, hairspray or blue painter’s tape.

These coatings provide a coating that makes it easier to remove prints. A properly leveled bed that doesn’t have the nozzle squishing onto the bed should fix the issue. PETG should be laid down from a higher height than PLA for this reason.

If your nozzle’s first layer goes deep onto the print bed, you are likely to see your PETG print getting really stuck to the print bed.

You can also try reheating the print bed, or you can pry the print off with a flat tool like a spatula. Try not to use excessive force with the spatula to avoid damaging the glass bed.

How to Fix PETG Stringing

The main methods to fix stringing in PETG prints is to increase retraction speed & distance, increase travel speeds, and decrease your nozzle temperature. PETG is prone to stringing, so you want to test your retraction settings by using a retraction tower. Use travel speeds of 200-250mm/s, depending on your printer.

Stringing is a big issue most users face when printing with PETG. The good news is that it can be avoided by modifying a few settings.

The first setting to modify would be the retraction settings. Try increasing the retraction distance gradually in 1mm increments until the stringing stops. Also, reduce the minimum travel distance too.

Secondly, increase the printer’s travel speed in 10-20mm/s intervals until you find the sweet spot. This reduces the time the printer takes to move from one point to another, giving the nozzle less time to ooze.

Lastly, if all these aren’t working, try reducing the nozzle temperature. The reduced temperature means that less molten filament will be available in the nozzle to ooze.

How Do You Smooth PETG 3D Prints?

There are several ways you can smooth your PETG print. Here are some of them:

  1. Sanding: You can erase the layer lines and other imperfections from your 3D print using sandpaper. It’s best to use a circular motion when sanding to avoid creating new directional layer lines on the model. Also, when sanding, start with coarse sandpaper and finish off with the finer sandpaper for the best results.
  2. Polishing: You can also smooth your 3D prints by applying a polishing compound like wax or a metal polish. The polish helps fill in the microscopic layer lines and gaps. Also, if it’s done right, it gives the 3D print a smooth mirror-like finish.
  3. Heat Treatment: It involves using a heat gun to smooth out the print’s surface. The heat gun melts a thin layer of the print’s outer surface to fill in the layer lines. This is done continuously until the print is finally smooth.

Is PETG Flexible?

Although PETG is not as flexible as filaments like TPU, it still displays impressive tensile strength, which makes it virtually unbreakable in the layer direction. It is also more durable, impact-resistant, and flexible than ABS or PLA.

What is the Best PETG Filament?

There are several PETG filaments on the market for buyers to choose from. Out of these, there are some filaments users generally flock to because they offer great quality at a decent price.

These filaments are:

Here are some of the popular filaments on the market and their printing temperatures.

  1. Overture PETG
  2. Hatchbox PETG
  3. TecBears PETG

Overture PETG

Overture PETG is one of the most popular brands of PETG you can get out there, with over 8,000 reviews and a rating of 4.5/5.0 at time of writing. Many reviews mention how it is an amazing filament, especially for the low and competitive price.

This filament comes in several colors that you can use for any 3D printing projects and even comes with a 200 x 200mm build surface.

It has characteristics such as:

  • Clog free & bubble free
  • Less tangles and easy to use
  • Cost-effective
  • Wide range of compatibility
  • Safe & odorless
  • Little shrinkage
  • High impact strength
  • Has a little shine and spark to it
  • 100% satisfaction guarantee

Get yourself a spool of Overture PETG from Amazon today.

Hatchbox PETG

Hatchbox PETG is a well-respected brand of PETG that works for plenty of users and comes in over 30 different colors. It has a dimensional accuracy of +/- 0.03mm which significantly reduces clogging and print failures.

PETG is a great alternative to PLA and ABS since it has amazing toughness and stiffness, while still being relatively lightweight. This Hatchbox PETG is good at resisting moisture absorption, gives good adhesion and is even safe for the environment.

You can trust in the quality and reliability of this filament. It comes vacuum-sealed with desiccant for the ideal quality that produces successful 3D prints.

You can find a spool of Hatchbox PETG from Amazon.

TecBears PETG

Another great PETG filament that many users are happy with is the TecBears PETG filament. It has high purity and low shrinkage so you can get the best dimensional accuracy with your 3D models. You’ll get some excellent layer bonding with this filament.

Each spool of filament is dried for 24 hours before they package it up with a vacuum-sealed packaging, along with the desiccants to keep it dry. They make sure it is mechanically wound up with strict manual examination, to guarantee a smooth 3D printing experience.

It has an even better dimensional accuracy than the Hatchbox PETG at +/- 0.02mm, making it a high quality and consistent filament to use in your 3D printer. They recommend a nozzle temperature of 220-250°C and a bed temperature of 70-80°C.

Get yourself a spool of TecBears PETG from Amazon today.

Well, we’ve reached the end of the article. I hope I’ve been able to answer all your questions about PETG. Remember, don’t be scared to experiment and find your perfect settings.

Good luck printing!

Sours: https://3dprinterly.com/filament-printing-guide/petg/

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