Slant front desk plans

Slant front desk plans DEFAULT

Slant-Front Desk

This beautiful slant-front desk can add a little class to your office space. It provides a large work surface and lots of storage too.

Wood movement is a real concern with projects that feature solid wood panels. That's because as solid wood expands and contracts with seasonal changes in humidity, joints can pop and boards may warp or split. With this desk, sliding dovetail joints allow the wide, solid wood side panels to move independently of the frames that hold the panels together. It's a traditional technique that will keep the panels flat for generations. Ogee bracket feet complete the case and raise it off the ground. We've included separate instructions on how to make them easily with a table saw and band saw. All the visible parts of this desk are solid, 3/4"-thick black cherry. We've also included plans for a pigeonhole unit which features vertical dividers, drawers, and an easy-to-build hidden compartment.

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All drawings are to scale, have appropriate joinery and are drawn using components so that the SketchUp Model can be exploded apart for detail sizing and analysis.  The rendered pictures were done using Kerkythea rendering software.  All drawings are available for download.

DescriptionPhotosSketchUp
Model

1880 Writing Desk

This writing desk is a modified design that I worked up after seeing a couple of similar antique desks.  The originals were circa 1880 so I'm calling this the "1880 Desk".  The original desks had a single drop down door but I have also drawn one with 2 doors which I felt were more functional

Desk (1 Door)

Desk (2 Door)

1910 Writing Desk

This simple desk originates from Austria, circa 1910. The doors have beveled glass. The primary joinery is dados and mortise and tenon with dovetailed drawers.

American Federal Writing  Desk

This is an American Federal writing desk with bi-fold doors on the top section that open to reveal small drawers and document compartments. The bottom section has a fold over writing section and two long drawers below. The piece is decorated with several classic Federal inlay designs. The primary joinery is dados and mortise and tenon with dovetailed drawers.

American Mahogany Spinet Desk

A writing table or secretary with a hinged flip-top that reveals a pullout desktop with multiple storage bins. Known as a spinet or piano desk because when closed it resembles a musical instrument of the harpsichord family.  The desk sits on turned and fluted vase shaped legs.  Circa 1920. A solid desk with mortise and tenon joinery and dovetail drawers.

Arts & Crafts Bookcase - Scotland 1910

This desk originates from England, circa 1890 to 1919. The desk is supported by turned legs and a bank of drawers. The upper hutch has small drawers and scroll work on the top. The primary joinery is dados and mortise and tenon with dovetailed drawers.

Arts & Crafts Ladies Window Writing desk

This Arts & Crafts Edwardian period (early 20th century) is unique and possibly one of a kind.  The rear multi pane window sets this piece apart form others. Besides the twin center drawers the primary storage is located on the inside and outside of the two end cabinets.  The primary joinery is dados and mortise and tenon.

Arts & Crafts Oak Library desk

This desk is done in an Arts & Crafts or Mission Oak style.  A solid oak desk with mortise and tenon joinery and dovetail drawers.

Arts & Crafts Secretary Curio

This desk is done in an Arts & Crafts design and brings together elements from both a secretary desk and curio cabinet.  These combined characteristics make for an interesting and decorative piece of furniture.

Arts & Crafts Walnut Writing Desk

A nicely designed Arts and Crafts walnut knee hole desk, circa 1920. The three frieze drawers sit above 2 end book shelves with spindled galleries. The primary joinery is dados and mortise and tenon with dovetailed drawers.

Art Deco Jean Royere Desk

An Art Deco style desk with round pedestals and 4 drawers. The original is from France, circa 1920.

Art Nouveau Daily Desk

A nicely designed Oak Art Nouveau desk with hutch. The original comes from France, circa 1900. The primary joinery is dados and mortise and tenon with dovetailed drawer.

Art Nouveau English Victorian Desk

A nice piece of period Art Nouveau furniture in Walnut from England, circa 1900. The primary joinery is dados and mortise and tenon with dovetailed drawer.

Art Nouveau Mahogany Desk

An elegant Art Nouveau style French desk, circa 1905. The primary joinery is dados and mortise and tenon with dovetailed drawer.

Biedermeier Period Ladies Desk

A Biedermeier Period Ladies Desk originating from Germany, circa 1855. The primary joinery is dados and mortise and tenon with dovetailed drawers.

Chippendale Kneehole Desk

Here's a copy of an original 1770s Chippendale period desk originating from England.  The desk top tips up to expose an interior with a slanted writing surface.  The joinery is mostly mortise and tenon and the drawers are dovetailed.

Contemporary English Writing Desk

Here's a functional and stylish writing desk designed with a contemporary English style in mind.  It has flaired legs, drawers above and below, and a drop down writing surface with plenty of storage space. The joinery is mostly mortise and tenon and the drawers are dovetailed.

Craft Desk

A smaller desk with plenty of storage that can be used for crafts. The primary joinery is dados and mortise and tenon with dovetailed drawers.

Belgium Children's Desk

This drawing is of a rare Belgium children's desk build in the early 1950's.  The desk has a chromed-tubular frame with a Beach top and drawers. The desk has a retractable tambour cover.

Bent Leg Desk

This drawing reflects a modern design where the front desk legs flow across the front of the desk to form drawer handles. The desk is Oak and the joinery is mostly mortise and tenon.

Butler Secretary

Here is a drop front Butler's or Secretary type desk. The desk sits on turned legs and has a glass display hutch. The joinery is mortise-and-tenon.

Curved Mission Desk

Here's a different look at a curved leg desk in a Mission style.  The majority of the joinery is mortise and tenon.

Contemporary Teak Desk

Here's a copy of a unique Danish hand made Teak desk from the 1960's.

Country Desk with Hutch

Here's a copy of a unique hand made desk (C. 1900) that I saw listed on an antique auction site.  The desk has a rustic country look.  The base desk has plenty of drawer space and a slanted writing surface.  The hutch has an open arched book shelf, topped with a single drawer and flanked by 2 cupboards.  The joinery is mostly mortise and tenon.

Country Store Desk - Spool Desk

This is a slant top country store desk or spool desk. The lift top has a black writing surface. There is a raised area, designed like a small cornice that will hold an ink bottle and 3 pens. The original is from the late 1800s and was commonly found in country stores and served as a desk and storage cabinet for spooled thread.

Desk-on-Frame

Desks on frame are the rarest of the American slant top desks. This version is of New England style which dates back to the 1700s and mid-1800s.  The desk is a 2 part desk and frame construction and uses mostly dado and mortise and tenon joinery.

Desk-on-Frame - Early American

This version of a desk on a frame is a reproduction of an antique desk that I saw and liked the design.  I believe that the original was built a little later than the one pictured above.

Dickens' Desk

Here’s a copy of an original 1880s desk styled after the famed Charles Dickens desk.  This desk has the same characteristics of the original Dickens Desk including twin pedestals, double drawer handles and a sloped writing surface that opens to reveal additional storage space and drawers.  The upper superstructure has 8 small drawers that support a central turned baluster gallery and shelf. 

Early American Writing Desk

Here's a simple writing desk in an Early American or Colonial style.  The desk is the right size to function as a student's desk.  There are 5 drawers (three in the hutch and two in the base) and an upper shelf.  The joinery is mortise and tenon.

Eastlake Style Cylinder Desk

This circa 1875 Victorian Secretary desk and bookcase is based on the popular Eastlake style design with a cylinder roll top that was also popular during this period.  The desk and bookcase use mortise and tenon joinery.  The drawer joinery, rather than dovetails, is made using a cove and pin style that was popular in Eastlake furniture.

Eastlake Style Ladies Desk

This is a circa 1900 Victorian ladies tambour desk in an Eastlake style. The desk is unusual and may be one of a kind.  It has a pullout writing surface with a mixture of drawers, cabinets and book shelves.  The desk is very ornate and has an abundance of period carvings and period details.  The joinery is mortise and tenon.

Eastlake Style Library Bookcase

The history of this 1885 Victorian and Eastlake style desk is that it was handmade for a home in St. Paul and is made from solid Walnut. It has a glassed upper cabinet on one side with additional book shelving and mirror on the other.  The lower left side has a keyed cabinet within a cabinet.  The joinery is mortise and tenon with ornate spindles.

Eastlake Style Victorian Desk

This is a good example of a late 1800s Eastlake style Victorian era desk.  The original was made with Rosewood and burled veneers.  The joinery is mortise & tenon and dovetail.  

Edwardian Kidney Shaped Writing Table

This is a good example of an Edwardian period kidney shaped writing table made in Mahogany. The original dates to around 1890-1910.  The legs are forked and are spaced with a curved stretcher and the drawer fronts follow the curved shape of the top.

Edwardian Library Writing Table

A late 19th century Edwardian style library table from England. The desk has an extending writing shelf. The exterior is painted. The primary joinery is dados and mortise and tenon with dovetailed drawer.

Edwardian 1900 Mahogany Desk

A Carlton House Edwardian Mahogany desk from England, circa 1900. The primary joinery is dados and mortise and tenon with dovetailed drawers.

Edwardian Mahogany Inlaid Writing Desk

This is a great example of a Edwardian period desk made during King Edward VIIs reign in Britain from 1901 to 1911.  This desk has curved sides & back with curved drawers on the base and top hutch.  The desk is rimed with inlays.  Much of the joinery is mortise and tenon. This desk was a challenge to draw and I would assume to build.

Edwardian Inlaid Writing Table

This desk originates from England, circa 1890 to 1919. The desk is supported by turned legs and a bank of drawers. The upper hutch has small drawers and scroll work on the top. The primary joinery is dados and mortise and tenon with dovetailed drawers.

English 1800 Country Desk

An early English Country desk with a lifting writing surface.  The joinery is mortise & tenon with dovetail drawers.

English 1840 Writing Table

This is a good example of an early English Victorian Mahogany writing table, circa 1840.  The table has 3 drawers that stand on four tapered and fluted legs, with brass castors cups and castors.  The joinery is mortise & tenon with dovetail drawers.

English Oak Secretary Bureau Bookcase

This secretary desk and bookcase is modeled from a circa 1920s.  The bookcase has leaded glass.

English Open Pedestal Desk

This rather large open pedestal desk or writing table was originally built in England around 1870.  The legs or pillers are tapered and fluted. The design and show of the paneled back makes the desk ideal for center room placement.  The joinery is mortise & tenon with dovetail drawers.

English Regency Ladies Writing Table

This is a Regency era ladies kneehole writing desk with 5 drawers and turned legs with brass casters.  The original was from England, Circa 1820.  The joinery is mortise & tenon and dovetail.

Executive Desk - Mid Century Modern

This desk is patterned from a mid-century (1950s) modern style built in the United States.  The original was built using Walnut and sits on hand shaped legs.

Federal Secretary Bookcase

This Federal style desk and bookcase is modeled from a similar desk from North Shore Massachusetts, circa 1800.  A writing surface folds out to expose additional drawers and pigeon hole compartments.  Dark Walnut is used for edging and inlays.

George III 1800 Kneehole Desk

A George III era kneehole desk originating from England, circa 1800. The desk stands on bracket feet and has 6 side drawers, an apron drawer, a wide top drawer and a central cupboard. The primary joinery is dados and mortise and tenon with dovetailed drawers.

Gillows Style Writing Table

A Mahogany writing table in the style of Gillows, London England, Circa 1845.  The table has two beaded drawers, a shaped gallery on three sides, and turned and reeded legs ending in brass casters.  The joinery is mortise & tenon and dovetail.

Gothic Cathedral Desk

This desk is modeled from the one made by M. Raymond and was inspired by the arches found on gothic cathedrals. The joinery is mortise & tenon and dovetail.

Hepplewhite Style Ladies Desk

This desk is modeled from a style known as Hepplewhite furniture made popular during the late 1700s and early 1800s.  True to the Hipplewhite style this desk is ornate and uses wood inlays. The desk has classic mortise and tenon as well as dovetail joinery. 

Honeoye Modern Floating-Top Desk

Iconic mid-century (1959) desk with a curved floating top.  The curved and tapered legs on the left side are held with brass supports.  There are 3 drawers and a handy book shelf on the right side.

Italian Mid Century Stoppino Desk

This drawing is based on a Italian desk designed by Giotto Stoppino from the 1960s.  The desk has a Tambour that closes over a shelf and inner storage compartments.  In between the upper and lower desk tops there are 2 drawers. The legs are tubular chrome steel.

Italian Teak Desk

This drawing is based on a Italian desk from the 1960s.  The writing surface pulls out for use and the top lid slides up and out of the way for access to the desk compartments.  There are 4 internal walnut drawers.  The desk sits on a wooden structure and each leg has an exposed final.

Kentucky Slant Front Desk

This drawing is based on a Kentucky slant-front desk circa early 1800s. The hutch was added with glass doors. The writing surface/lid drops down and is supported by a pull out support that looks like a drawer.

Kneehole Desk - Bow Front

Here's my version of a Kneehole Desk with bowed front drawers.  This type of desk was first manufactured in England in the early 18th century.

Kneehole Desk - Ladies Victorian

Here's my version of a Victorian Kneehole desk that is small enough to fit a lady.  The desk has 9 drawers and a shallow recessed center cupboard with door and an adjustable shelf.

Lexington Drop Lid Desk

An antique Bannister back armchair from New England, probably Portsmouth, NH, circa 1770. The primary joinery is mortise and tenon.

Mid-Century Corner Desk

A mid century modern corner desk with turned legs and a curved front section. The primary joinery is mortise and tenon with dovetailed drawers.

Mid-Century Double Sided Desk

A classic (1960's) Danish design in Teak.  The desk has an A-frame leg design that holds the top slightly above the drawer compartments.  The back side of the desk has 3 display compartments, two open and one with a swing down door.

Mission Arts & Crafts Secretary & Bookcase

This Secretary desk is done in a mixed Arts & Crafts and Mission style. The left side cabinet is a display or bookcase and the right side has a drop down writing surface that exposes pigeonhole compartments.  There is an upper shelf with mirror.

Mission Style Writing Desk

This is a my version of a Mission style wring desk.  As you may have already assumed for a piece of Mission furniture, most all the joinery is mortise and tenon and made from Red Oak.  I have added a hutch with ample drawer and shelving storage.

New England Writing Desk

This is an Early American or New England writing desk circa 1835.  The desk's highlights include scrolls on the backsplash and sides and visible dovetail joinery attaching the back and sides.  The original was made from Butternut wood.

New Hampshire Federal Secretary Desk

This model is based on a Circa 1800s Federal period ladies writing desk from New Hampshire. The base has four drawers and a fold out writing surface. The interior of the secretary top has several drawers and cubbies. The construction uses mortise-and-tenon and dovetail joinery.

Paymaster Desk

This is a my version of an Early American Paymaster Desk.  The design is simple and uses mortise and tenon joinery.

Pennsylvania 7 Drawer Cherry Desk

This is an interesting desk that is intended to be built in Cherry. The desk hutch has 6 drawers and a center cabinet. The writing surface flips open to extend the writing/working area. The construction uses mortise and tenon joinery.

Petite Antique Writing Desk

Here's a copy of an antique writing desk or side table with single drawer, scalloped apron, and graceful cabriolet legs.  Circa 1700s, from France.

Plantation Desk

Here's a fairly common and simple Plantation Desk. It has one wide drawer and the upper cabinet contains adjustable shelving.  It's designed after similar desks from the late 1800's to early 1900's.

Plantation Desk - American Walnut

This desk really doesn't fit the design and stile of a Plantation Desk, but it's unique enough that I really don't know what stile it follows.  The writing surface on the right lifts to a storage area while the cabinet on the left opens to reveal adjustable shelves.

Plantation Desk - Kitchen Hutch

An early example of a Plantation Desk that may have been used as a kitchen hutch.  Circa early 1800s.  The construction uses mortise and tenon joinery with dovetail drawers.  The hutch has two glass doors for display of its contents.  The inside of the hutch is painted white.  The legs and drawer fronts have decorative inlays.

Regency Writing Desk-1960

This is a replica a antique style Regency writing desk made in England, circa 1960.  The desk has a serpentine front with 2 serpentine drawers.  The square tapered legs have a brass medallion at the top.  The hutch has 6 drawers and 2 doors.  The construction uses mortise and tenon and dovetail joinery.

Residency Campaign Desk

This desk has a bowed front with 5 drawers. The front half of the top flips up to reveal pigeon hole storage and a writing surface that pulls out. The primary joinery is dados and mortise and tenon with dovetailed drawers.

Sea Captain's Desk

This is a replica of a Sea Captain's Desk from the late 1800s. This style desk, also known as a Davenport Desk, was commonly thought of as "Ship's Captain's" desks, very efficient and organized in a compact design that took up little space. Reputed to have gotten their name from the inventor, Captain John Davenport, back in the days of Clipper Ships plying their trade to the Far East.

Secretary Desk

This Secretary Desk was the first project that I designed from the ground up (in 1977) because I couldn't find a complete plan that I liked.  I took the best design features from several ideas and married them together to come up with this desk.  Photos of the actual desk can be found on the "Projects" page HERE

Shaker Drop Front Desk

This drop front desk is designed in a Shaker style. The desk uses multiple wood to accent panels and drawer fronts.  True to a Shaker style, there are two side drawers. The construction uses mortise and tenon and dovetail joinery.

Sheraton Writing Desk

A early 1800's Sheraton style writing table. The table top has a leather center and scalloped rounded corners. It all sits on turned and fluted legs. The primary joinery is dados and mortise and tenon with dovetailed drawers.

Southern Colonial  Desk

A Southern Colonial Desk from Tennessee. The desk has 5 drawers with faux fronts. The back of the desk has raised panels and the turned spindle legs are in Early American style. The primary joinery is dados and mortise and tenon with dovetailed drawers.

Stonefield Floating-Top Desk

This model is based on an American mid-century (1960s) desk. The desk sits on 4 turned legs (back legs extend to the top desk surface) with 4 side drawers and a center drawer. The top gives the allusion of floating. The construction uses dados, dowels and dovetail joinery.

Stonefield High Cabinet

A reproduction desk based on a French style bonheur du jour (lady's writing desk). The primary joinery is dados and mortise and tenon with dovetailed drawers.

Stonefield Secretary Desk-Bookcase

Here's an Eastlake Victorian Secretary desk circa 1870. The original desk is made from Walnut with construction of frame and panel and mortise and tenon joinery.

Stonefield Mid-Century Desk

This drawing is based on a Italian desk in Rosewood from the 1960s.  The legs are 2 piece laminated and show a gap between.  The top floats above a secondary false top and 3 drawers.

Stonefield Mission Desk

Here's a simple desk done in Mission style that displays a plane and  uncluttered design.  Made in Red Oak with classic mortise and tenon joinery.

Stonefield Shaker Hutch

Here's a tall desk and hutch combination designed with Shaker simplicity.   Made in Cherry with classic pinned mortise and tenon joinery.

Victorian Leather Top Writing Table

A Victorian era (circa 1860s) with 3 drawers and turned legs. The primary joinery is dados and mortise and tenon with dovetailed drawers.

Victorian Library Desk

This Victorian Walnut Library Desk is from England, circa 1872.  As you can see, the desk is quite involved and illustrates great craftsmanship.

Victorian Secretary Desk

This Victorian Secretary Desk is from England, circa 1890. The cabinet has several large drawers, two glass door cabinets with several shelves, and a drop down front desk that reveal several tiny drawers.  68"H, 47"W, 13"D

Victorian Drugstore Secretary

This is a replica of an 1880 Victorian Secretary that is said to be from an apothecary or drugstore. It is very unique and most likely one of a kind. It is made with 3 parts (base, middle and upper book case). The mid section has 2 locking compartments and a pull out writing surface. The model is drawn with detailed mortise-tenon and dovetail joinery.

Victorian Secretary Bookcase

This is a replica of a Victorian Secretary built with solid Walnut, circa 1860. There is a small flip out lid for a writing surface and the upper cabinet has adjustable shelves. The model is drawn with detailed mortise-tenon and dovetail joinery.

Writing Desk - Mid Century Walnut

Here's a unique one of a kind American made mid century (1960s) desk or vanity.  The top has 2 pull out drawers floating on 8 chrome tubular legs.  The desk top has 3 light colored inserts and the leg tops and bottoms have chrome bands.

   
Sours: http://www.creeksidewoodshop.com/Creeksidewoodshop-Drawings/Desks/Drawings-Desks.html
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Joining solid wood to solid wood can be a problem Sliding dovetails are one answer A dovetail tongue fits in a dovetail groove so the pieces of wood can move Its a strong joint that doesnt need any glue

The rabbeted miterjoint starts out the same on all the mating pieces (the top and side panels). Cut a Vg'-deepkerf across the insideface of all three pieces.

MMliiMB

FENCE

ATTACH RUB STRIP

TO WORKPIECE WITH CARPET TAPE

FENCE

ATTACH RUB STRIP

TO WORKPIECE WITH CARPET TAPE

V6"

SET BLADE TO 45' ANGLE

Cutting the miter is critical — the blade must align to the kerf. To help, stick a piece ofMasoniteto the workpiece. Then adjust the fence and sneak up on the cut.

Cutting the miter is critical — the blade must align to the kerf. To help, stick a piece ofMasoniteto the workpiece. Then adjust the fence and sneak up on the cut.

: ! 1 Y

/ >■*■ RUB / STRIP

TOP ONLY

__________________________4—1. »

1

The last cut is a rabbet on the top piece only. Again use the Masoniterub strip, but this time to help position the blade in relation to the long point ofthe miter.

The last cut is a rabbet on the top piece only. Again use the Masoniterub strip, but this time to help position the blade in relation to the long point ofthe miter.

Woodsmith

case. And since all the drawers are different heights, the dovetail grooves are different distances apart.

To lay out the position of the dovetail grooves, measure up from the bottom of the case sides, see Fig. 1. Then draw a line across the inside face of each side panel to indicate the center of the dovetail grooves.

Note: Since the sliding dovetailjoints are to be hidden on the front of the case, these grooves stop 3/8M from the front edge, see Figs. 1 and lc.

ROUT dovetail GROOVES. Now the dovetail grooves can be routed. To do this, I used a Vfc'tiovetail bit and guided the router along a straightedge clamped to the workpiece, see Fig. 2. (Refer to Shop Notes on page 15 for information on building a self-aligning router edge guide.)

Now rout the five stopped dovetail grooves on each of the sides, see Fig. 2.

ANGLED CORNERS. After the dovetail grooves have been routed, the next thing to do is cut off the front corners at a 35° angle to produce the slant front, see Fig. 3.

To do this, first lay out the angle on both of the case sides, refer to Fig. 1. Then the angle is cut in two steps. First, cut to within about Vi6M of the line. (Make this rough cut on both side panels.)

To get the same angle on both side panels, they could be clamped together and hand planed to the mark. But I did something different. After the rough cut, I clamped a straightedge along the pencil line (on the right-hand panel) and used a flush trim bit in the router to complete the cut and smooth the edge, see Fig. 3. Shop Note: To avoid chipout along the edge, rout from the lower corner to the upper corner.

To cut the second (left-hand) side panel identical to the first, I clamped the two panels together so they were flush along the top, back, and bottom edges. Then I ranthe bearing of the flush trim bit along the smooth edge of the first panel to trim a matching edge on the second panel.

RABBET. Finally, cut a rabbet along the back edge of the side panels to accept a plywood back panel, see Figs, lb and 2.

Hufflepuff Basement

After flush trimming the angle on both side panels, set the panels aside and work can continue on the case top (B).

ATTACH LIP. Before cutting the case top to finished width, I first glued a thin top lip (C) to the underside of the front edge, see Figs, la and 4. This lip acts as a stop when the pigeonhole unit is installed inside the assembled case, refer to Fig. 5 on page 25.

rip TWO BEVELS. After attaching the top lip, rip a 35° bevel along the front edge ofthe case top, see Figs. 5 and 6. Note: The angle of this bevel must be exactly the same as the angle on the two side panels so the door will fit tight to the case when it's closed.

Cut this bevel with the top face against the table, see Fig. 5.

Next, rip an intersecting bevel along the front edge, this time with the bottom face against the table, see Fig. 6. Note: Because of the lip on the front edge, the workpiece won't lie flat on the table for this second cut. That's okay — only the angle of the first bevel is critical.

rip top TO WIDTH. Now the case top can be ripped to finished width (with the beveled edge against the fence). Note: Sneak up on the finished width until the top aligns to the sides at the front and back edges, see Fig.l.

To accept a plywood panel for the back of the case, cut a rabbet along the lower back edge of the top piece, see Fig. 7.

RIP FENCE

RIP FENCE

AUX.

FENCE

TOP I

RABBET ALONG BACK EDGE OF TOP

SHELF & FRAMES

When I finished building the case sides and top, I began work on the shelf and the web frames that hold the sides together.

SHELLF. The shelf (D) is built from glued-up stock just like the case sides and top. Then it's ripped to finished width to match the width of the sides (less the width of the rabbet for the back panel), see Fig. 8.

To determine the finished length of the shelf, measure across the underside of the top, from the shoulder to shoulder. To this dimension add the combined depth of the opposing dovetail grooves (%")• Now cut the shelf (D) to this length.

FRAMES. All four web frames are built the same way. Two side drawer runners fit between a front and a back rail with stub tenon and groovejoints, see Figs. 8 and 9.

Note: Since the back rails and drawer runners will be hidden, I used a less expensive wood (maple). But for the visible front rails, I used cherry.

Start by ripping all the frame pieces to finished width, see Fig. 8.

Next, cut the front and back drawer rails (E and F) to finished length to match the length of the shelf (D).

To determine the length of the drawer runners (G), measure from the front edge of the case side to the shoulder of the rabbet at the rear. Then subtract the width of both drawer rails. To this number add 1" (for a V2M-long tenon on the end of each runner), then subtract W (for an expansion gap where the runners meet the back rail).

grooves & TENONS. The next step is to cut a groove centered on the inside edges of all the frame pieces, see Fig. 9. Note: Cut these grooves to match the thickness of the W'-thick plywood to be used as a dust (and rodent) barrier for the lower panel.

Now cut stub tenons on both ends of all the drawer runners, see Figs. 8 and 9.

SLOT MORTISES. A pair ofvertical dividers separate the top drawer from the two sliding door supports, refer to Fig. 8 and the Exploded View. These dividers have stub tenons on the ends that fit into slot mortises, refer to Figs. 10,11,and 15.

TOP DIVIDERS. After routing the mortises, I ripped two dividers (H) to finished width to match the front rails, see Fig. 11 .To determine the length of the dividers, measure between the centers of the top two dovetail grooves and subtract W.

After cutting the dividers to length, cut the stub tenons on the ends, see Fig. 11.

DRAWER GUIDES. Next, I cut a pair of drawer guides (I) forthe top drawerto ride against, see Figs. 8 and 11.

Measure Sliding Dovetail

DOVETAIL TONGUES. Now I routed the dovetail tongues that fit the dovetail grooves in the case sides (A), see box at right.

Note: Rout dovetail tongues on theendsof all eight web frame rails, see Fig. 12. Also, rout a tongue on both ends of the shelf (D) and on the edges of the drawer runners.

NOTCHES. Before the front rails (E) and shelf (D) canbe glued in place, notches must be cut atthe ends, see Fig. 12. Also notch the front edge ofboth dividers (H), see Fig. 11.

RAIL LIP. Next cut a narrow rail lip (J) to fit between the shoulders of the front rail of the bottom web frame, see Figs. 8 and 8a. (This supports molding attached later.)

CASE ASSEMBLY

Here's where all the parts get joined to create the carcase of the desk.

Shop Note: Because the solid wood sides must be allowed to expand and contract with changes in humidity, the case is assembled with glue only in certain spots, see Fig. 14. Don't put glue on the tongue of the front rail.

(It will scrape off in the dovetail groove.) Instead, apply gl groove. Also, do not apply glue to the glue to the front end of the tongues on i

. Start assembling the case by sliding the shelf (D) in place in the upper dovetail groove. This holds the sides to-ether while the web frames are installed. here's a sequence for installing the frames. With the shelf in place, continue by sliding

How Sliding Joints Move

SLIDING DOVETAIL JOINT

A sliding dovetail is a two-part joint. Even without glue, the angled sides of the tongue fit the angled walls of the groove exactly. It's a strong way to join two pieces of wood.

Routing both parts of the joint must be precise — a tight fit holds the project to-ether. But the joint shouldn't be too tight. ou must be able to assemble the parts.) The secret to the best fit is sneaking up on the final cut until the tongue just fits the groove. To help, I built a tall fence (page 14).

GROOVES. Dovetail grooves are routed TONGUES. Dovetail tongues are routed with a hand-held router. Set depth of cut on the router table. The height of the bit and then run router against a straightedge, matches the depth ofthe dovetail groove.

in the front drawer rail until the front edges are flush. Next slide in both drawer runners so the tongues at the front fit into the grooved edge ofthe front rail, see Fig. 14.

PLYWOOD panel. Now cut a dust panel (IQ the same length as the drawer runner to fit inside the web frame. Note: I installed a panel only in the lower web frame. But since the other frames have grooves to accept a panel, you could install a panel in these as well. (Extra panels add weight and cost.)

Finally, slide in the back rail. This should fit flush to the shoulder of the rabbet for the back panel. Note: There should be a VV'gap between the back of each runner and the front edge ofthis rail. Thislets thecase sides contract without splitting the frames.

TOP WEB FRAME. The assembly sequence for the top web frame is a little different than for the lower frames. The difference is the dividers (H). These are glued in the mortises between the shelf and front rail before the drawer runners are installed, see Fig. 15. Here, the extra-long mortises (on the underside of the shelf) permit the tenons to slide in even though the rail and shelf are in place.

Now install the remaining sections of the top web frame as you did the lower frames. Then install the top (B) between the sides.

UPPER guides & rail LIP. Complete assembly of the case by gluing the drawer guides (I) onto the upper frame runners, see Figs. 8 and 11. Also, glue on the rail lip 0), see Figs. 8 and 8a.

DON" GLUE RUNNER INTO GROOVE OR BACK RAIL

DON" GLUE RUNNER INTO GROOVE OR BACK RAIL

ONLY

GLUE DUST PANEL INTO FRONT RAIL AND DRAWER RUNNERS

ONLY

GLUE DUST PANEL INTO FRONT RAIL AND DRAWER RUNNERS

OGEE FEET & MOLDING

A Chippendale piece of furniture like this is distinguished by its short, sculptured feet (called ogee bracket feet). On page 26 we're showing how to build the ogee bracket feet.

MOLDING STRIP. After making and installing the feet, cut a blank for the molding (L) to finished width and rough length, see Fig. 16. Then rout a profile along the edge with a 3/8" round-over bit, see Fig. 16a.

Now miter the molding to fit around the front and sides of the case. Glue on the front strip, but for the side strips only apply glue to the mitered corner. Anchor the back part of the strips with screws from inside the case through slotted shank holes, see Fig. 16.

OGEE FEET & MOLDING

DOOR & DOOR SUPPORTS

The fold-down door is made up of three pieces — a glued-up panel and two "breadboard" ends, see Fig. 17.

DOOR ENDS. After the door panel (M) is trimmed to finished size, cut a pair of door ends (N) to length (to match the width of the panel).

TONGUES, GROOVES & RABBETS. Now the door ends are joined to the door panel with tongue and groovejoints, see Figs. 17and 17b. Note: To allow the wide panel to expand and contract, the ends are glued only along the middle third of the tongues, see Fig. 17.

After the door unit is built, rout a round-over (with a small shoulder) around all four edges on the outside face, see Fig. 17a.

Then, to allow the door to fit inside the door opening, rout a rabbet on the inside face of three edges, see Fig. 17b. (Don't rabbet the bottom edge.)

DOOR SUPPORTS. Now rip a pair of door supports (0) to width Vi6" less than the height of the opening to fit between the case ana dividers. Then cut the door supports to finished length, see Fig. 18.

Next, cut a pair of support ends (P) to length to match the width of the supports, see Fig. 18. Then rip the support ends to finished width, and attach them to the supports with tongue and groovejoints.

relief NOTCH. Next I routed a shallow notch along the top edge of each door support, see Fig. 19. This allows the support to slide with a minimum amount of binding.

DOWEL PIN & BRASS KNOB. Now glue a dowel pin into each door support as a stop, see Fig. 20. Then a small brass knob can be attached to the front of the support end.

INSTALL DOOR. Before starting on the drawers, I installed the door with a pair of brass hinges mounted flush to the surfaceof both the door and the shelf, see Fig. 21.

ATTACH KNOB & ESCUTCHEON PLATE CENTERED 2" FROM TOP EDGE

ATTACH KNOB & ESCUTCHEON PLATE CENTERED 2" FROM TOP EDGE

DRILL W HOLE W DEEP

DRILL W HOLE W DEEP

POOR SUPPORT END 0 ^

DOOR SUPPORT

POOR SUPPORT END 0 ^

a. ROUTER TABLE FENCE

DOOR SUPPORT ASSEMBLY

a. ROUTER TABLE FENCE

ROUT RELIEF DEEP

DOOR SUPPORT ASSEMBLY

ROUT RELIEF DEEP

DRAWERS

At this point the project becomes more like an ordinary cabinet with dovetail-joined drawers. There's only one small difference. On most chests of drawers, all the drawers are the same width. On this desk, all the drawers are the same width except the top drawer (because of the door supports).

DRAWER PARTS. I began the drawers by cutting the drawer backs (S, T, U, V) Vs" smaller in each dimension than the drawer openings, see Fig. 22. Note: I used VV'-thick maple for all the drawer backs and sides.

Next, cutthe drawer fronts (W,X, Y, Z) to the same size as each drawer back. (I used 3/4"-thick cherry for the drawer fronts.)

After that, cut eight drawer sides (AA, BB, CC, DD) to the same height as the fronts and backs. Note: Cut the sides 15/8M

shorter than the depth of the drawer openings. This allows for the stop blocks (GG), plus Vfe" for the drawer backs, see Fig. 22a. It also allows for a 3/s" overhang on tne front when the drawers are closed, see Fig. 22b.

DOVETAIL JOINTS. After cutting all the drawer parts to finished size, rout half-blind dovetails on the ends of each. (I used a dove-tailjig with a router and a W dovetail bit.)

Before assembling the drawers, rout a WL deep groove around the lower inside face of each drawer part to accept a V4" plywood bottom, see Fig. 22. (Note: Measure your plywood and cut the groove to this size — 1/4" plywood is usually less than V4" thick.)

ROUND-OVERS. Also, rout a round-over around the face of each of the drawer fronts, see Fig. 22b. This profile should match the profile around the door, see Fig. 17a.

DRAWER BOTTOMS. Now cut the drawer bottoms (EE, FT) to fit, and glue up the drawers. (Note: I used V4" maple plywood for the drawer bottoms with the grain direction

DRAWER 1

DRAWER 1 SIDE

DRAWER 1 BOTTOM (W PLYWOOD)

HW) DRAWER 1 I FRONT

43/fc"

DRAWER 2

383/s" LONG

DRAWER 1

DRAWER 1 SIDE

DRAWER 1 BOTTOM (W PLYWOOD)

HW) DRAWER 1 I FRONT

43/fc"

DRAWER 2

383/s" LONG

A Half-blind dovetails are customary on a well-built dra wer. We routed thejoints using a hand-held router and a dovetailjig.

running from front to back. You could cut the bottoms so the grain runs from left to right, but it will take extra plywood.)

GLIDES & STOPS. To keep each drawer centered in its opening, I glued thin drawer glides to the sides of the case and runners, see Fig. 23. Finally, cut and glue a pair of drawer stop blocks (GG) to the back rail for each of tne drawers, see Fig. 24.

24

SHELF

3/4" X 1 1/4" x 3"

GLUE STOPS TO

BOTH SIDES OF CASE j

( s

^" \ ^^^ DRAWER 3 \CTOP BLOCK

PIGEONHOLE INSERT

The top of a desk can get awfully cluttered. So it's helpful to have a way to organize the stuff inside. That's the reason for this pigeonhole unit, see photo.' It's a separate assembly that slides into the desk from behind.

The unit is just a large egg-crate divider made from 3/8M-thick stock. (I started with W-thick cherry and planed it to W thick.) Two compartments have vertical dividers that fit into dadoes in the horizontal pieces.

But the best part are the drawers. These are just boxes that slide into three of the openings. Note: Ifyouhave something especially valuable to hide, you can add a hidden compartment behind the middle drawer. (For more on this see Shop Notes, page 15.)

EXPLODED VIEW

NOTE:

ALL HARDWOOD IS 3/8" THICK

EXPLODED VIEW

NOTE:

ALL HARDWOOD IS 3/8" THICK

CUTTING DIAGRAM

A&B

F

WM

3/S" x 6" x 60" (TWO BOARDS @ 2.5 SQ. FT. EACH)

G

G G

G

G

G

'A

7777777777772

W x 6" x 66" (TWO BOARDS @ 2.8 SQ. FT. EACH)

C D

ALSO NEED: 1/4" PLYWOOD LEFT OVER FROM DESK BACK

MATERIALS

CASE

A Top (1)

3/6 X IP/4

- 38^/16

B Bottom (1)

3/6 X 113/4

- 387/16

C Sides (2)

3/6 X 113/4

-1111/16

D Case Dividers (2)

113/4

-1111/16

E Middle Shelf (1)

3/6 X 113/4

-127/16

F Outside Shelves (2)

3/6 X 113/4

-125/6

G Storage Dividers (6)

3/6 X 113/4

- 95/16

DRAWERS

H Mid. Drawer Fr/Bk (2)

3/6 X 45/16

121/6

I Mid. Drawer Sides (2)

3/$ X 45/16-

111/2

J Mid. Drawer Bott. (1) 1/4 x 11H

111/4

K Out. Drawer Fr/Bk (4)

3/6 X 11V)6

-125/16

L Out. Drawer Sides (4) %x 1 15/16_i 1

M Out. Drawer Bott. (2) 1/4x11i3/16-] 11/4

PIGEONHOLE ASSEMBLY

For the best fit inside the desk, I built the pigeonhole unit from the outside in.

rip TO WIDTH. To start, first measure from the back edge of the door lip (C) to the shoulder of the rabbet at the back of the case, refer to Fig. 5. Then rip all the case parts to the same width (113/4M in my case).

cut TO LENGTH. Next, I cut the case top (A) and bottom (B) to length to fitfrom side to side in the desk opening. Note: I actually cut them W less than the openings so they could slide inside but still be fairly tight.

After the top and bottom are cut to length, the sides (C) and dividers (D) can also be cut to length. To determine their length, measure the height of the desk opening and subtract W (since they fit in dado joints). Then subtract another Vi6" forease of installation.

RABBETS & DADOES. When cutting the rabbets and dadoes, I cut opposing pieces at the same time. This way, all thejoints willbe aligned opposite each other.

SHELVES & STORAGE DIVIDERS. After the dadoes and rabbets are cut, the case can be dry assembled. Thenthe shelves (E, F)can be cut to length to fit inside the case.

Next, cut the storage dividers (G) to fit between the case top and outside shelves, see Fig. 3. Then, to make it easier to pull files from the compartments, I cut an arc on the front of each of the dividers, see Fig. 2.

ASSEMBLY. Now the case can be assembled with glue and No. 4 screws to hold the joints together, see the Exploded View.

DRAWERS. The last thing to do is build the drawers. Design Note: To add a hidden compartment behind a drawer as explained on page 15,that drawer must be built shallower.

The drawers are made using 3/8M-thick stock. (Again, I used solid cherry.)

First cutthe fronts and backs (H and K) W less than the height and width of the opening, see Fig. 4. Then rip the sides (I and L) to the same height as the front/back pieces, see Fig. 4.

NOTE: CUT ALL PIECES

123,i"

2Vfc"

CASE DIVIDER

123,i"

2Vfc"

BOTTOM

CASE DIVIDER

387/16"

NOTE: ALL DADOES ARE

3" RADIUS

3/4" RADIUS

I STORAGE

NOTE: STORAGE DIVIDERS ARE NOT GLUED PLACE

ASSEMBLE CASE WITH GLUE AND

#4 x 3/4" Fh WOODSCREWS

ASSEMBLE CASE WITH GLUE AND

#4 x 3/4" Fh WOODSCREWS

RABBETS. Next, cut a rabbet joint at both ends of each drawer front/back, see Fig. 4a. Now the sides can be cut to length to fit between the rabbets. Note: When the drawers are closed, the fronts fit flush with the case.

DRAWER bottoms, I used W 1 plywood for the drawer bottoms (J and M), see Fig. 4. Then cut a groove around the inside ofthe drawer parts. Finally, assemble the drawers with glue in thejoints and in the grooves.

Reinforcement Concrete Floor

INSERT PIGEONHOLE UNIT FROM REAR OF DESK

Sours: https://www.woodworkingarchive.biz/slant-front-desk/joining-solid-wood-to-solid-wood-can-be-a-problem-sliding-dovetails-are-one-answer-a-dovetail-tongue-fits-in-a-dovetail-groove-so-the-pieces-of-wood-can-move-its-a-strong-joint-that-doesnt-need-any-glue.html

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Plans slant front desk

Pulled her back to me. sensing something was wrong, he began to resist, I grabbed him tightly with my left hand, grabbed him with my arms in the chest area, and with the other one. Spread his buttocks and tried to push his penis. very soon I got it pretty easy.

For The Love Of Furniture :: Ep.2 Chippendale Slant Front Desk

"Ksyusha get ready, we want to walk around the city Xia, I said and wanted to leave, but she took my hand and did not let go. She went to the closet, opened it and slowly bending over, began to take off her shorts, then erotically took off her. T-shirt.

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What are you doing here. The question, I suppose, is rhetorical. and the girl, casually wiping her mouth with her sleeve.



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