Nasa mars helicopter

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DateTitleChannelMay 20, 2021Space Cameras: A Sharper Image
Channels that carried the live broadcast include: YouTube and Facebook.

Speakers from JPL:
- Dr. Justin Maki, Imaging Scientist and Deputy Principal Investigator for Mastcam-Z on the Perseverance rover
- Hallie Abarca, Mars 2020/Perseverance Image and Data Processing Operations Lead

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NASA JPLMay 4, 2021Mars Helicopter and the Future of Extraterrestrial FlightReplay on YouTube
NASAApril 30, 2021News Briefing: Next Steps for Mars Helicopter
Channels that carried the live broadcast include:
YouTube and NASA App.

Participants are:
- Lori Glaze, planetary science director at NASA Headquarters, Washington
- MiMi Aung, Ingenuity Mars Helicopter project manager at JPL
- Bob Balaram, Ingenuity Mars Helicopter chief engineer at JPL
- Jennifer Trosper, Perseverance rover deputy project manager at JPL
- Ken Farley, Perseverance project scientist at Caltech

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NASA JPLApril 29, 2021Taking Flight: How Girls Can Grow Up to be Engineers -
Get Your Ideas Off the Ground!

Speakers from JPL:
- MiMi Aung, Ingenuity Mars Helicopter project manager
- Jessica Samuels, surface systems manager for the Mars 2020 mission
- Priyanka Sharma, systems engineer for NISAR and president of JPL's Advisory Council for Women

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NASA JPLApril 22, 2021Taking Flight: How Girls Can Grow Up to be Engineers -
Internships and Other Opportunities

Speakers from JPL:
- Vandi Verma, chief engineer, robotic operations for the Mars 2020 mission
- Jessica Gonzales, software systems engineer
- Ota Lutz, elementary and secondary education lead
- Leslie Lowes, STEM informal education specialist

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NASA JPLApril 19, 2021News Briefing: Mars Helicopter Post-Flight
Channels that carried the live broadcast include:
YouTube and Facebook.

Participants are:
- Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator of NASA's Science Mission Directorate
- Michael Watkins, JPL director
- MiMi Aung, Ingenuity Mars Helicopter project manager at JPL
- Bob Balaram, Ingenuity Mars Helicopter chief engineer at JPL
- Håvard Grip, Ingenuity Mars Helicopter chief pilot at JPL
- Justin Maki, Perseverance Mars rover imaging scientist and deputy principal investigator of Mastcam-Z instrument at JPL

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NASAApril 19, 2021Live Broadcast: Mars Helicopter First Test Flight Results
Channels that carried the live broadcast include:
YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, Twitch, and NASA App.Replay on YouTube
NASAApril 15, 2021Taking Flight: How Girls Can Grow Up to be Engineers -
Chart Your Path!

Speakers from JPL:
- Kim Steadman, systems engineer
- Nagin Cox, engineering operations deputy team chief
- Samantha Hatch, human resources specialist

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NASA JPLApril 9, 2021News Briefing: Mars Helicopter Pre-Flight
Channels that carried the broadcast include:
YouTube and Facebook.Replay on YouTube
NASA JPLApril 8, 2021Experts Discuss NASA's Mars Helicopter - Talk for StudentsReplay on YouTube
NASAJPL EduApril 5, 2021Month of Ingenuity - Helicopter Flight PreviewReplay Webinar
NASA JPLApril 5, 2021Mars Helicopter Live Q&A: One Step Closer to First FlightReplay on YouTube
NASA JPLMarch 23, 2021News Briefing: Preview First Mars Helicopter Flights
Read news release ›Replay on YouTube
NASA JPLMarch 11, 2021Public Talk: Helicopters in Space

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NASA JPLMarch 8, 2021Taking Flight: How Girls Can Grow Up to be Engineers

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NASA JPLJuly 28, 2020Mission Tech and Humans to Mars BriefingReplay on YouTube
NASA KSC-JPLApril 29, 2020 Meet Ingenuity, the Mars Helicopter
MiMi Aung, Mars Helicopter Project Manager Replay on YouTube
NASA JPL
Sours: https://mars.nasa.gov/technology/helicopter/

Status Updates

Labels of the Ingenuity Mars Helicopter's rotor blade, pitch link, servo, and swashplate.

Ingenuity's Upper Swashplate Assembly: The upper swashplate of NASA's Ingenuity Mars Helicopter controls the pitch of the upper rotor blades as they rotate and is critical to stable, controlled flight. The swashplate is driven by three small servo motors. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech. Download image ›

It’s been an eventful several Martian days, or sols, since our last blog post, so we wanted to provide everyone with an update on where things stand on Mars. In our last post, we explained that we were getting ready to begin flying with a higher rotor speed to compensate for decreasing atmospheric density caused by seasonal changes on Mars. Increasing the rotor speed is a significant change to ...

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Labels of the Ingenuity Mars Helicopter's rotor blade, pitch link, servo, and swashplate.

Mars Helicopter Sol 193-Navigation Camera: NASA’s Ingenuity Mars Helicopter acquired this image using its navigation camera during its 13th flight on Sep. 5, 2021 (Sol 193 of the Perseverance rover mission) at the local mean solar time of 12:06:30. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech. Download image ›

In the months since we flew for the first time, we have learned a great deal about operating a helicopter on Mars. We have explored Ingenuity’s strengths and limitations in detail, leveraging the former and working around the latter to operationalize it as a highly capable reconnaissance platform. With the benefit of the knowledge acquired, conducting flights on Mars has in most ways become ...

Read more

Labels of the Ingenuity Mars Helicopter's rotor blade, pitch link, servo, and swashplate.

This image sand dunes, boulders, and rocky outcrops of the “South Séítah” region of Mars’ Jezero Crater was captured by NASA’s Ingenuity Mars Helicopter during its 12th flight, on Aug. 16, 2021. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech. Download image ›

“The longer you look back, the farther you can look forward.” –Winston Churchill  Following Flight 12’s scouting images of “South Séítah,” which were the most valuable Ingenuity has taken to date, we are taking Winston’s advice for Ingenuity’s 13th flight. We will again be venturing across into Seítah to scout an area of outcrops glimpsed in Flight 12 imagery – but we’re taking these new pictu...

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Labels of the Ingenuity Mars Helicopter's rotor blade, pitch link, servo, and swashplate.

This annotated image depicts the ground tracks of NASA’s Perseverance rover (white) and Ingenuity Mars Helicopter (green) since arriving on Mars on Feb. 18, 2021. The upper yellow ellipse depicts the “South Séítah” region, which Ingenuity is scheduled to fly over during its 12th sortie. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech. Download image ›

Ingenuity’s team is suiting up again for its next big challenging sortie, Flight 12. Taking place no earlier than Monday, Aug. 16 at 5:57 a.m. PDT, or 13:23 LMST (local Mars time), the 174th sol (Martian day) of the Perseverance mission, the flight will venture into the geologically intriguing “South Séítah” region (top yellow circle in graphic above).   This latest effort will be similar to...

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Labels of the Ingenuity Mars Helicopter's rotor blade, pitch link, servo, and swashplate.

Ingenuity's 11th Flight:This annotated image of Mars’ Jezero Crater depicts the ground track and waypoints of the Ingenuity Mars Helicopter’s planned 11th flight, scheduled to take place no earlier than Aug. 4, 2021. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona. Download image ›

We’re heading northwest for the 11th flight of NASA’s Ingenuity Mars Helicopter, which will happen no earlier than Wednesday night, Aug. 4. The mission profile is designed to stay ahead of the rover – supporting its future science goals in the “South Séítah” region, where it will be able to gather aerial imagery in support of future Perseverance Mars rover surface operations in the area. Her...

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Labels of the Ingenuity Mars Helicopter's rotor blade, pitch link, servo, and swashplate.

This annotated image of Mars’ Jezero Crater depicts the ground track and waypoints for Ingenuity’s planned tenth flight – scheduled to take place no earlier than Saturday, July 24. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona. Download image ›

Ingenuity has come a long way from its original airfield, “Wright Brothers Field,” which is 0.64 miles (1.04 kilometers) to the northeast of our current location. We got here during Flight 9, an endeavor that had our helicopter breaking several of our own records as we relocated to the far side of the "Séítah" geologic unit. Covering 2,051 feet (625 meters), Flight 9 was executed ...

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Labels of the Ingenuity Mars Helicopter's rotor blade, pitch link, servo, and swashplate.

NASA’s Perseverance Mars rover took this image overlooking the “Séítah” region using its navigation camera. The agency’s Ingenuity helicopter flew over this region during its ninth flight, on July 5. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech. Download image ›

It has been a week of heightened apprehension on the Mars Helicopter team as we prepared a major flight challenge for Ingenuity. We uplinked instructions for the flight, which occurred Monday, July 5 at 2:03 am PT, and waited nervously for results to arrive from Mars later that morning. The mood in the ground control room was jubilant when we learned that Ingenuity was alive and well after comp...

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Labels of the Ingenuity Mars Helicopter's rotor blade, pitch link, servo, and swashplate.

NASA's Mars Perseverance rover acquired this image using its Left Mastcam-Z Camera. Mastcam-Z is a pair of cameras located high on the rover's mast. This image was acquired on Jun. 15, 2021 (Sol 114). Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/ASU. Download image ›

Since Ingenuity’s historic first flight on April 19, where it hovered about 10 feet (3 meters) above the Martian surface for 30 seconds, we have been progressively stretching the capabilities of the helicopter by flying farther, faster, and more aggressively. Ingenuity has flown at altitudes up to 33 feet (10 meters) and ground speeds up to 13 feet (4 meters) a second. It covered a distance of ...

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Labels of the Ingenuity Mars Helicopter's rotor blade, pitch link, servo, and swashplate.

Ingenuity Helicopter in 3D: NASA's Ingenuity Mars Helicopter is seen here in 3D using images taken June 6, 2021, by the left and right Mastcam-Z cameras aboard NASA’s Perseverance Mars rover. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/ASU/MSSS. Download image ›

As of June 21, 2021, Ingenuity Mars Helicopter has successfully flown its 8th flight, traveling about 525 feet (160 meters) south-southeast from Airfield D to the new Airfield E! This marks the third flight in the Operations Demonstration Phase of Ingenuity, in which the team will continue to push the flight envelope of the aircraft while learning valuable operational lessons. Flight 8 was also...

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Labels of the Ingenuity Mars Helicopter's rotor blade, pitch link, servo, and swashplate.

NASA’s Ingenuity Mars Helicopter acquired this image on May 22, 2021 using its black and white navigation camera. This camera is mounted in the helicopter’s fuselage and pointed directly downward to track the ground during flight. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech. Download image ›

The next flight of NASA’s Ingenuity Mars Helicopter will take place no earlier than this Sunday, June 6. Regardless of flight date, data will be returned to Earth over the subsequent three days. The flight profile will send Ingenuity to a location about 350 feet (106 meters) south of its current location, where it will touch down at its new base of operations. This will mark the second time ...

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Sours: https://mars.nasa.gov/technology/helicopter/status/
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Mars Helicopter

The Ingenuity Mars Helicopter is a small aircraft carried to the surface of the Red Planet attached to the belly of the Perseverance rover. Ingenuity’s mission is experimental in nature and completely independent of the rover’s science mission.

Ingenuity was deployed to the surface on April 4, 2021. On April 19, it became the first aircraft in history to make a powered, controlled flight on another planet. Flight at Mars is challenging because the Red Planet has a significantly lower gravity – one-third that of Earth’s – and an extremely thin atmosphere with only 1% the pressure at the surface compared to our planet. This means there are relatively few air molecules with which Ingenuity’s two 4-foot-wide (1.2-meter-wide) rotor blades can interact to achieve flight.

The rotorcraft’s flights are autonomous – piloted by onboard guidance, navigation, and control systems running algorithms developed by the team at JPL. Because data must be sent to and returned from the Red Planet over millions of miles using orbiting satellites and NASA’s Deep Space Network, Ingenuity cannot be flown with a joystick, and its flights are not observable from Earth in real time.

To operate at Mars, the rotorcraft requires the Perseverance rover to assist in communications back and forth from Earth.

After its fifth test flight (May 7, 2021), the Ingenuity experiment embarked on a new operations demonstration phase, exploring how aerial scouting and other functions could benefit future exploration of Mars and other worlds. The data from these flights is also being used to help inform decisions relating to considering small helicopters for the role as full standalone science craft carrying instrument payloads. In the distant future, Mars helicopters might even help astronauts explore the Red Planet.

In addition, the rotorcraft’s imagery is being used to directly support the Perseverance rover’s exploration of Jezero Crater. The science team is finding pictures from an aerial perspective beneficial helping assess what geologic features and locations are worthy of exploration, and rover planners are using the same to map out safe routes to get there.

Sours: https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/missions/ingenuity

NASA’s Ingenuity Mars Helicopter Spots Perseverance From Above

More About Ingenuity

The Ingenuity Mars Helicopter was built by JPL, which also manages the technology demonstration project for NASA Headquarters. It is supported by NASA's Science, Aeronautics Research, and Space Technology mission directorates. NASA's Ames Research Center in California’s Silicon Valley, and NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, provided significant flight performance analysis and technical assistance during Ingenuity's development. AeroVironment Inc., Qualcomm, and SolAero also provided design assistance and major vehicle components. Lockheed Martin Space designed and manufactured the Mars Helicopter Delivery System.

More About Perseverance

A key objective for Perseverance’s mission on Mars is astrobiology, including the search for signs of ancient microbial life. The rover will characterize the planet’s geology and past climate, pave the way for human exploration of the Red Planet, and be the first mission to collect and cache Martian rock and regolith.

Subsequent NASA missions, in cooperation with ESA (European Space Agency), would send spacecraft to Mars to collect these sealed samples from the surface and return them to Earth for in-depth analysis.

The Mars 2020 Perseverance mission is part of NASA’s Moon to Mars exploration approach, which includes Artemis missions to the Moon that will help prepare for human exploration of the Red Planet.

JPL, which is managed for NASA by Caltech in Pasadena, California, built and manages operations of the Perseverance rover.

For more about Perseverance:

mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/

and

nasa.gov/perseverance

Sours: https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/nasas-ingenuity-mars-helicopter-spots-perseverance-from-above

Helicopter nasa mars

This image sand dunes, boulders, and rocky outcrops of the “South Séítah” region of Mars’ Jezero Crater was captured by NASA’s Ingenuity Mars Helicopter during its 12th flight, on Aug. 16, 2021. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech. Download image ›

“The longer you look back, the farther you can look forward.” –Winston Churchill 

Following Flight 12’s scouting images of “South Séítah,” which were the most valuable Ingenuity has taken to date, we are taking Winston’s advice for Ingenuity’s 13th flight. We will again be venturing across into Seítah to scout an area of outcrops glimpsed in Flight 12 imagery – but we’re taking these new pictures while looking back, pointing in the opposite direction.

Taking place no earlier than Saturday, Sept. 4 at 5:08 p.m. PDT, or 12:04 LMST (local Mars time), the 193rd sol (Martian day) of the Perseverance mission, the flight will again journey into the geologically intriguing South Séítah region. However, instead of probing further into Séítah and taking pictures of multiple ridgelines and outcrops (which we did on 12), we’ll be concentrating on one particular ridgeline and its outcrops during Flight 13. We’ll also be flying at a lower altitude – 26 feet (8 meters), as opposed to the 33 feet (10 meters) during 12.

Another big difference is which way our camera will be pointing. For Flight 13, we’ll be capturing images pointing southwest. And when they’re combined with Flight 12’s northeast perspectives, the overlapping images from a lower altitude should provide valuable insight for Perseverance scientists and rover drive planners. 

When you compare our estimated flight time and distance travelled for this trip, it again reinforces just how much we’re concentrating our efforts in one small area. On Flight 12 we covered 1,476 feet (450 meters) of Martian ground in 169.5 seconds and took 10 pictures (again – all pointed northeast). On 13, we’ll cover about 690 feet (210 meters) in around 161 seconds and take 10 pictures (pointing southwest)… 

And for those of you scoring at home, on 13 we’ll also be traveling at 7.3 mph (3.3 meters per second). We did 10 mph (4.3 meters per second) during 12.

While we’re talking about numbers, in our last blog, Chief Pilot Håvard talked about our logbook (the Nominal Pilot’s Logbook for Planets and Moons). Below is an updated ledger of some of the most important numbers for Ingenuity’s Mars flights so far. Along with those listed below, we’ve taken 72 13-megapixel color images and 1,390 black-and-white navigation camera images. We’re looking forward to add to these numbers and learning more about that ridgeline when “lucky 13” is in the books.


Since Deployment
(April 3, 2021/Sol 43)
In Tech DemoIn Ops Demo% Above Tech Demo
Sols Achieved14131111358%
Num. Flights1257140%
Distance Flown (m)2671 m (~1.44 nmiles)

499 m

2172 m435%
Time Flown (s)1308 s (21 min 48 s)396 s912 s230%
Sours: https://mars.nasa.gov/technology/helicopter/status/329/lucky-13-ingenuity-to-get-lower-for-more-detailed-images-during-next-flight/
First Video of NASA’s Ingenuity Mars Helicopter in Flight, Includes Takeoff and Landing (High-Res)

Mars Helicopter Sol 193-Navigation Camera: NASA’s Ingenuity Mars Helicopter acquired this image using its navigation camera during its 13th flight on Sep. 5, 2021 (Sol 193 of the Perseverance rover mission) at the local mean solar time of 12:06:30. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech. Download image ›

In the months since we flew for the first time, we have learned a great deal about operating a helicopter on Mars. We have explored Ingenuity’s strengths and limitations in detail, leveraging the former and working around the latter to operationalize it as a highly capable reconnaissance platform.

With the benefit of the knowledge acquired, conducting flights on Mars has in most ways become easier than it was at the outset. But in one important way it is actually getting more difficult every day: I’m talking about the atmospheric density, which was already extremely low and is now dropping further due to seasonal variations on Mars.

When we designed and tested Ingenuity on Earth, we expected Ingenuity’s five-flight mission to be completed within the first few months after Perseverance’s landing in February 2021. We therefore prepared for flights at atmospheric densities between 0.0145 and 0.0185 kg/m3, which is equivalent to 1.2-1.5% of Earth’s atmospheric density at sea level. With Ingenuity in its sixth month of operation, however, we have entered a season where the densities in Jezero Crater are dropping to even lower levels. In the coming months we may see densities as low as 0.012 kg/m3 (1.0% of Earth’s density) during the afternoon hours that are preferable for flight.

The difference may seem small, but it has a significant impact on Ingenuity’s ability to fly. At our lower design limit for atmospheric density (0.0145 kg/m3), we know that Ingenuity has a thrust margin of at least 30%. Thrust margin refers to the excess thrust that Ingenuity can produce above and beyond what is required to hover. That additional thrust is needed on takeoffs and climbs, during maneuvers, and also when tracking terrain with varying height. But if the atmospheric density were to drop to 0.012 kg/m3 in the coming months, our helicopter’s thrust margin could drop to as low as 8%, which means that Ingenuity would be operating close to aerodynamic stall (a condition where further increases in the blade’s angle of attack does not produce more lift, only more drag).

Thankfully, there is a way to tackle this issue – but it involves spinning the rotors even faster than we have been doing up to now. In fact, they will have to spin faster than we have ever attempted with Ingenuity or any of our test helicopters on Earth. This is not something we take lightly, which is why our next operations on Mars will be focused on carefully testing out higher rotor speeds in preparation for future flights.

We will begin by performing a high-speed spin of the rotor without leaving the ground, reaching a peak rotor speed of 2,800 rpm (more than a 10% increase relative to our prior Mars experience of 2,537 rpm). If all goes well, we will follow this with a short test flight at a slightly lower rotor speed of 2,700 rpm. This would be our 14th flight and (hopefully) a relatively boring one compared to any of our more recent flights, where we flew long distances to acquire images of interest for the Perseverance rover team. Occurring no earlier than Friday, Sept. 17 (with data coming down no earlier than Saturday morning), the short hop would have Ingenuity take off, climb to 16 feet (5 meters), perform a small translation (sideways move), and then land again. And while the results from a Flight 14 should be less than riveting, the significant increase in available rpms (from 2,537 to 2,700) for future helicopter operations will provide us the option to perform scouting missions for Perseverance at lower atmospheric densities. It also leaves some wiggle room if we decide an additional rpm increase is needed later.

A speed increase like this comes with a number of potential issues. One of these has to do with aerodynamics: A rotor speed of 2,800 rpm, in combination with wind and helicopter motion, could cause the tips of the rotor blades to encounter the air at nearly 0.8 Mach – that is, 80% of the speed of sound on Mars. (The speed of sound on Mars is somewhat lower than we are used to – about ¾ the speed of sound on Earth.) If the blade tips get sufficiently close to the speed of sound, they will experience a very large increase in aerodynamic drag that would be prohibitive for flight. For Ingenuity’s rotor we do not expect to encounter this phenomenon until even higher Mach numbers, but this has never been confirmed in testing on Earth.

Another potential issue is unknown resonances in the helicopter structure. Like all mechanical systems, Ingenuity has resonances that can lead to large vibrations when excited at particular frequencies. It is important to ensure that there are no significant resonances at the rotor speed used for flight, as this could cause damage to hardware and lead to a deterioration in sensor readings needed by the flight control system.

Additional demands will also be put on several components of Ingenuity’s design: The motors will need to spin faster, the electrical system will need to deliver more power, and the entire rotor system will need to withstand the higher loads that come with increased rotor speeds. It all adds up to a significant challenge, but by approaching the issue slowly and methodically, we hope to fully check out the system at higher rotor speeds and enable Ingenuity to keep flying in the months ahead. Stay tuned for updates.

Sours: https://mars.nasa.gov/technology/helicopter/status/334/flying-on-mars-is-getting-harder-and-harder/

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Mars helicopter Ingenuity aborted latest flight attempt because of anomaly

NASA's Mars helicopter Ingenuity didn't get off the ground as planned earlier this month.

Ingenuity was scheduled to make its 14th Red Planet sortie on Sept. 18, a relatively short and simple hop that would have demonstrated the little chopper's ability to fly with slightly higher rotor speeds — 2,700 revolutions per minute (RPM) rather than the usual 2,537 RPM.

The mission team is making this adjustment to deal with the Martian atmosphere, which is thinning out slightly as the seasons change on the floor of the Red Planet's Jezero Crater, Jaakko Karras, Ingenuity deputy operations lead at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California, wrote in an update Tuesday (Sept. 28).

Related:Watch NASA's Mars helicopter Ingenuity explore intriguing Raised Ridges

Ingenuity performed a high-speed rotation test on Sept. 15, spinning its blades at 2,800 RPM for a spell while it remained on the ground. Everything went well, paving the way for the Sept. 18 flight. But the 4-pound (1.8 kilograms) chopper did not end up taking off that day.

"Here's what happened: Ingenuity detected an anomaly in two of the small flight-control servo motors (or simply 'servos') during its automatic pre-flight checkout and did exactly what it was supposed to do: It canceled the flight," Karras wrote.

Ingenuity has six servos, three for each of its two rotors. The little motors adjust the pitch of the rotors, allowing the chopper to control its orientation and position during flight.

"The servo motors are much smaller than the motors that spin the rotors, but they do a tremendous amount of work and are critical to stable, controlled flight," Karras wrote.

Analysis of the Sept. 18 preflight test has shown that two of Ingenuity's servos oscillated slightly during the "servo wiggle" checkout. The team is still trying to determine the cause, but it may be due to increasing wear in the servo gearboxes and linkages, Karras wrote. (Ingenuity is a technology demonstrator that was originally supposed to make just five flights on the Red Planet.)

Ingenuity passed two additional servo wiggle tests on Sept. 21 and Sept. 23, however, "so the issue isn’t entirely repeatable," Karras wrote. "We have a number of tools available for working through the anomaly, and we're optimistic that we'll get past it and back to flying again soon."

But orbital dynamics will keep Ingenuity grounded for a couple more weeks at least. Mars is now in "solar conjunction," meaning it's on the other side of the sun from Earth. Our star can corrupt and otherwise interfere with communications sent between the two planets, so NASA has stopped sending commands to Ingenuity and its other Red Planet robots — including Ingenuity's much larger partner, the Perseverance rover— until mid-October, when Mars will come more clearly into view.

"Ingenuity will not be completely idle during this time, however; Ingenuity and Perseverance will be configured to keep each other company by communicating roughly once a week, with Ingenuity sending basic system health information to its base station on Perseverance," Karras wrote. "We will receive this data on Earth once we come out of conjunction, and will learn how Ingenuity performs over an extended period of relative inactivity on Mars. See you on the other side of conjunction!"

Mike Wall is the author of "Out There" (Grand Central Publishing, 2018; illustrated by Karl Tate), a book about the search for alien life. Follow him on Twitter @michaeldwall. Follow us on Twitter @Spacedotcom or Facebook. 

Join our Space Forums to keep talking space on the latest missions, night sky and more! And if you have a news tip, correction or comment, let us know at: [email protected]

SPACE.COM SENIOR SPACE WRITER — Michael has been writing for Space.com since 2010. His book about the search for alien life, "Out There," was published on Nov. 13, 2018. Before becoming a science writer, Michael worked as a herpetologist and wildlife biologist. He has a Ph.D. in evolutionary biology from the University of Sydney, Australia, a bachelor's degree from the University of Arizona, and a graduate certificate in science writing from the University of California, Santa Cruz. To find out what his latest project is, you can follow Michael on Twitter. 
Sours: https://www.space.com/mars-helicopter-ingenuity-flight-14-abort


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