Vanguard sp500 mutual fund

Vanguard sp500 mutual fund DEFAULT
CategoryS&P 500 Index
Portfolio StyleS&P 500 Index
Fund FamilyVANGUARD ADMIRAL
Fund StatusOpen
Fund InceptionNovember 13, 2000
Managers

Butler

Louie

The Fund seeks to track the performance of its benchmark index, the S&P 500. The Fund employs an indexing investment approach. The Fund attempts to replicate the target index by investing all of its assets in the stocks that make up the Index with the same approximate weightings as the Index.

Front loadN/A
Deferred loadN/A
Max. redemption feeN/A
Total expense ratio0.04%
12 b-10%
Turnover4%
Alpha0.00
Beta1.00
Standard deviation5.36
R. squared1.00
Standard (taxable)$3,000
IRAN/A
Fund ReturnCategory1Index (S&P 500)% rank in categoryQuintile rank
YTD17.39%17.01%17.42%8%1
1yr27.25%26.72%27.28%9%1
3yr219.02%18.55%19.05%9%1
5yr217.48%17.00%17.52%11%1
10yr216.09%15.54%16.13%7%1
  • 1S&P 500 Index Funds
  • 23, 5 and 10 Year Returns are Annualized
Sours: https://www.marketwatch.com/investing/fund/vfiax

Vanguard Total Stock Market Index Fund vs. Vanguard 500 Index Fund

Vanguard Total Stock Market Index Fund vs. Vanguard 500 Index Fund: An Overview

Two of Vanguard's most popular products are—the Vanguard Total Stock Market Index Fund Admiral Shares (VTSAX) and the Vanguard 500 Index Fund Admiral Shares (VFIAX). While both can function as suitable core holdings in a stock portfolio, these similar-sounding mutual funds pursue different investment strategies.

As its name implies, the Total Stock Market Index Fund provides exposure to the entire U.S. equities market, as represented by the Center for Research in Security Prices (CRSP) U.S. Total Market Index of nearly 4,000 stocks.

On the other hand, the 500 Index Fund only provides exposure to 500 of the largest U.S. companies, similar to the S&P 500 Index. In this article, we'll review some of the similarities and differences between these two popular Vanguard mutual funds.

Note that there are two classes of the Vanguard Total Stock Market Index Fund and Vanguard 500 Index Fund—the Admiral shares and the Investor shares. The Investor shares of both funds—the Vanguard Total Stock Market Index Fund Investor Shares (VTSMX) and Vanguard 500 Index Fund Investor Shares (VFINX) are no longer open for new investment. The only difference between the Admiral and Investor share funds is the minimum required investment.

Key Takeaways

  • Though both are broad-based equity mutual funds, the Vanguard Total Stock Market Index Fund Admiral Shares (VTSAX) and the Vanguard 500 Index Fund Admiral Shares have different investment objectives.
  • The Vanguard Total Stock Market Index Fund invests in the entire U.S. equities market, consisting of thousands of publicly traded companies.
  • The Vanguard 500 Index Fund invests solely in the 500 largest U.S. firms that comprise the S&P 500 index.
  • The Vanguard Total Stock Market Index Fund could represent all of a portfolio's equity holdings, while the Vanguard 500 Index Fund should ideally be counterbalanced with aggressive growth stocks.

Vanguard Total Stock Market Index Fund (VTSAX)

The Vanguard Total Stock Market Index Fund (VTSAX) provides diversified exposure to small-, mid-, and large-cap growth and value stocks traded on the Nasdaq and New York Stock Exchange (NYSE).

Created on Nov. 13, 2000, the mutual fund has achieved an average annual return of 8.42% since its inception (as of June 30, 2021). This return is almost identical to that of the fund's benchmark, the CRSP U.S. Total Market Index. The fund employs a representative sampling approach to approximate the entire index and its key characteristics.

As of July 31, 2021, the fund held 3,908 stocks and controlled net assets of $1.3 trillion. Technology, financial, industrial, health care, and consumer service companies make up its largest holdings. VTSAX charges an extremely low expense ratio of 0.04% and requires a minimum investment of $3,000.

Both the Vanguard Total Stock Market Index and the Vanguard 500 Index mutual funds are also available as exchange-traded funds (ETFs).

Vanguard 500 Index Fund (VFIAX)

The first index fund for individual investors, according to the company, the Vanguard 500 Index Fund (VFIAX) provides exposure to a subset of the entire U.S. equity market—specifically, the Standard & Poor's 500 Index, whose component companies account for about three-fourths of the U.S. stock market’s value.

The Vanguard 500 Index Fund seeks to replicate its benchmark index by investing its total net assets in the stocks comprising the index and holding each component with approximately the same weight as the index. In this way, the fund barely deviates from the S&P 500, which it is designed to mimic. 

The fund was issued on Nov. 13, 2000. As of July 31, 2021, it has generated an average annual return of 7.93%.

As of June 30, 2021, the Vanguard 500 Index Fund had $753.5 billion in total net assets and, despite its name, holds 507 stocks. Like its sister fund, VTSAX charges an expense ratio of 0.04% and requires a minimum investment of $3,000.

Key Differences

In comparison to the Vanguard Total Stock Market Index Fund, the Vanguard 500 Index Fund has historically experienced slightly lower volatility and return. However, the Sharpe ratios (the most widely used method for calculating risk-adjusted return) are nearly identical, which indicates that investors in both funds had similar returns on a risk-adjusted basis.

The Vanguard Total Stock Market Index Fund is best suited for moderately to highly risk-tolerant investors seeking low-cost exposure to the U.S. stock market. Additionally, it could function as a single domestic equity fund in a portfolio.

Meanwhile, the Vanguard 500 Index Fund is suitable as a core equity holding for investors with a long-term investment horizon and a preference for the lower risk of the large-cap equity market. Since it does concentrate on more conservative, large-cap stocks, the fund might work best in a diversified portfolio that contains exposure to other types of equities for growth.

Sours: https://www.investopedia.com/articles/investing/111215/vanguard-total-stock-index-vs-vanguard-500-index-fund.asp
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CategoryS&P 500 Index
Portfolio StyleS&P 500 Index
Fund FamilyVANGUARD INDEX FDS
Fund StatusClosed
Fund InceptionAugust 31, 1976
Managers

Butler

Louie

The Fund seeks to track the performance of its benchmark index, the S&P 500. The Fund employs an indexing investment approach. The Fund attempts to replicate the target index by investing all of its assets in the stocks that make up the Index with the same approximate weightings as the Index.

Front loadN/A
Deferred loadN/A
Max. redemption feeN/A
Total expense ratio0.14%
12 b-10.01%
Turnover4%
Alpha-0.01
Beta1.00
Standard deviation5.36
R. squared1.00
Standard (taxable)N/A
IRAN/A
Fund ReturnCategory1Index (S&P 500)% rank in categoryQuintile rank
YTD17.30%17.01%17.42%22%2
1yr27.12%26.72%27.28%23%2
3yr218.90%18.55%19.05%28%2
5yr217.37%17.00%17.52%25%2
10yr215.97%15.54%16.13%20%1
  • 1S&P 500 Index Funds
  • 23, 5 and 10 Year Returns are Annualized
Sours: https://www.marketwatch.com/investing/fund/vfinx

Vanguard 500 Index offers diversified, low-turnover exposure to U.S. large-cap stocks at an attractive price. It tracks the market-cap-weighted S&P 500, which has historically been tough competition for active managers in the large-blend Morningstar Category. Its miniscule expense ratio gives this fund a durable performance edge over its category peers. Its Admiral, Institutional Select, and exchange-traded fund share classes earn a Morningstar Analyst Rating of Gold, while the Investor share class receives a Silver rating due to its relatively higher fee.

The S&P 500 is a market-cap-weighted index that harnesses the market’s collective wisdom and efficiently captures the opportunity set in the U.S. large-cap space. S&P’s index eligibility criteria require index constituents to be profitable and highly liquid. Its constituents are selected by an index committee and represent approximately 80% of the total market capitalization of the U.S. equity market. While the committee-based approach lacks transparency, it provides more flexibility around reconstitution and can reduce unnecessary index changes. This mitigates transaction costs as compared to more rigidly rule-based indexes.

The large-cap space enjoys a high level of information availability and liquidity, allowing new information to be quickly incorporated into prices. Market-cap weighting leverages the market’s collective wisdom to determine position sizes in an efficient manner. This approach promotes broad diversification and lowers unnecessary turnover. The portfolio is representative of the opportunity set in the large-cap market.

However, market-cap weighting can expose the index to significant stock- or sector-level concentration during the market’s intermittent manic episodes. This can tilt the portfolio toward richly valued names or sectors--such was the case at the height of the technology bubble. Nonetheless, in the long run, the benefits of broad diversification, low turnover, and a low fee outweigh these drawbacks.

Sours: https://www.morningstar.com/funds/xnas/vfinx/quote

Fund vanguard sp500 mutual

YearQ1Q2Q3Q4

20216.15%8.49%0.56%N/A

2020-19.63%20.52%8.89%12.12%

201913.62%4.27%1.67%9.03%

2018-0.79%3.40%7.67%-13.55%

20176.03%3.05%4.45%6.61%

20161.31%2.42%3.82%3.80%

20150.91%0.26%-6.48%7.00%

20141.76%5.19%1.09%4.89%

201310.57%2.87%5.20%10.46%

201212.54%-2.78%6.31%-0.42%

20115.88%0.07%-13.90%11.78%

20105.35%-11.45%11.26%10.71%

2009-11.00%15.97%15.59%6.03%

2008-9.47%-2.75%-8.36%-21.94%

20070.60%6.24%2.03%-3.36%

20064.18%-1.48%5.62%6.67%

2005-2.16%1.32%3.58%2.05%

20041.66%1.68%-1.91%9.21%

2003-3.19%15.39%2.60%12.12%

20020.24%-13.43%-17.22%8.39%

2001-11.90%5.82%-14.72%10.65%

20002.24%-2.61%-0.93%-7.81%

19994.98%7.00%-6.25%14.96%

199813.91%3.29%-9.95%21.39%

19972.63%17.41%7.48%2.84%

19965.36%4.44%3.05%8.36%

19959.71%9.49%7.94%6.01%

1994-3.84%0.40%4.86%-0.05%

19934.33%0.43%2.52%2.30%

1992-2.57%1.87%3.08%5.00%

199114.47%-0.29%5.28%8.36%

1990-3.07%6.24%-13.78%8.88%

19897.04%8.79%10.58%2.02%

19885.64%6.47%0.34%2.98%

198721.17%5.02%6.45%-22.71%

198613.96%5.77%-7.13%5.47%

19859.07%7.25%-4.01%16.86%

1984-2.24%-2.62%9.57%1.83%

19839.69%10.65%-0.25%0.18%

1982-7.16%-0.43%11.05%17.83%

19811.24%-2.40%-10.19%6.82%

1980-4.08%13.17%10.87%9.62%

19796.94%2.67%7.52%-0.00%

1978-5.23%8.20%8.67%-4.99%

1977-7.55%2.97%-2.90%-0.30%

19762.91%N/AN/AN/A

Sours: https://finance.yahoo.com/quote/vfinx/performance/
Vanguard 500 Index Fund VFIAX - The BEST Investment You Can Make

Top S&P 500 Index Funds

The Standard & Poor's 500 Index, or simply S&P 500, is a market-capitalization-weighted index of 500 large-cap U.S. companies that make up 80% of U.S. equity by market cap. It is widely regarded as the best gauge of large-cap U.S. equities and often referred to as “the market” because it is comprised of stocks that span all market sectors. Some of the S&P 500's largest components include Microsoft Corp. (MSFT), Apple Inc. (AAPL), Amazon.com Inc. (AMZN), Alphabet Inc. (GOOGL), and Facebook Inc. (FB).

There are many funds whose portfolio of stocks are designed to track those of the S&P 500 due to its popularity as a barometer of U.S. equity markets, including both mutual funds and exchange-traded funds (ETFs). The latter type of fund differs from traditional mutual funds in that they are listed on exchanges and trade throughout the day like ordinary stock.

Below we look at the top S&P 500 index funds, one with the lowest fees and the other with the highest liquidity. All data below is as of July 3, 2021.

Key Takeaways

  • Index investing has been gaining momentum over the past decade, with passive funds often outperforming their active counterparts for lower cost.
  • Among index investors, the S&P 500 has been the most widely watched benchmark index to track.
  • Here we look at a few of the most highly rated, low-cost S&P 500 index funds.

Lowest Cost S&P 500 Index Fund: Fidelity 500 Index Fund (FXAIX)

FXAIX is a mutual fund. Because index-tracking funds will follow the performance of the index, one of, if not the, biggest determinant of long-term returns is how much it charges in fees.

  • Expense Ratio: 0.015%
  • 2020 Return: 18.4%
  • Yield: 1.31%
  • Assets Under Management: $343.3 billion
  • Minimum Investment: $0
  • Inception Date: Feb. 17, 1988 (Share Class Inception Date: May 4, 2011)
  • Issuing Company: Fidelity

Lowest Cost Runner Up: Schwab S&P 500 Index Fund (SWPPX)

Schwab's S&P 500 index fund seeks to track the total return of the S&P 500 Index. The fund generally invests at least 80% of its net assets (including, for this purpose, any borrowings for investment purposes) in these stocks; typically, the actual percentage is considerably higher. It generally will seek to replicate the performance of the index by giving the same weight to a given stock as the index does.

  • Expense Ratio: 0.02%
  • 2020 Return: 18.39%
  • Yield: 1.57%
  • Assets Under Management: $62.2 billion
  • Minimum Investment: $0
  • Inception Date: May 19, 1997
  • Issuing Company: Charles Schwab

Lowest Cost Runner Up: Vanguard 500 Index Fund Admiral Shares (VFIAX)

Vanguard was the original index fund and still has the largest assets under management, with over $700 billion in its Vanguard 500 Index Fund Admiral Shares, as of July 2021. The investment seeks to track the performance of a benchmark index that measures the investment return of large-capitalization stocks. The fund employs an indexing investment approach designed to track the performance of the Standard & Poor's 500 Index.

  • Expense Ratio: 0.04%
  • 2020 Return: 18.25%
  • Yield: 1.33%
  • Assets Under Management: $739.5 billion
  • Minimum Investment: $3,000
  • Inception Date: Nov. 13, 2000
  • Issuing Company: Vanguard

Lowest Cost Runner Up: State Street S&P 500 Index Fund Class N (SVSPX)

Also in the running is State Street's offering, which also closely tracks the S&P 500 Index. This fund, however, requires a minimum of $10,000 invested.

  • Expense Ratio: 0.16%
  • 2020 Return: 18.59%
  • Yield: 0.94%
  • Assets Under Management: $1.6 billion
  • Minimum Investment: $10,000
  • Inception Date: Dec. 30, 1992
  • Issuing Company: State Street

Most Liquid S&P 500 Index Fund: SPDR S&P 500 ETF (SPY)

SPY is an ETF, not a mutual fund, and it's not even the lowest-cost S&P 500 ETF. It is, however, the most liquid S&P 500 fund. Liquidity indicates how easy it will be to trade an ETF, with higher liquidity generally meaning lower trading costs. Trading costs are not a big concern to people who want to hold ETFs long-term, but if you’re interested in trading ETFs frequently, then it’s important to look for high liquidity funds to minimize trading costs.

  • 2020 Return: 18.23%
  • Expense Ratio: 0.095%
  • Annual Dividend Yield: 1.3%
  • Assets Under Management: $378.7 billion
  • Inception Date: Jan. 22, 1993
  • Issuing Company: State Street

The comments, opinions and analyses expressed herein are for informational purposes only and should not be considered individual investment advice or recommendations to invest in any security or to adopt any investment strategy. While we believe the information provided herein is reliable, we do not warrant its accuracy or completeness. The views and strategies described on our content may not be suitable for all investors. Because market and economic conditions are subject to rapid change, all comments, opinions, and analyses contained within our content are rendered as of the date of the posting and may change without notice. The material is not intended as a complete analysis of every material fact regarding any country, region, market, industry, investment, or strategy.

Sours: https://www.investopedia.com/articles/markets/101415/4-best-sp-500-index-funds.asp

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