Hissing sound from lpg gas regulator

Hissing sound from lpg gas regulator DEFAULT

Two residential propane tanks

Propane is a safe and clean-burning heating option and has very little impact on the environment, but, as with any fuel, it is important to know how to properly handle propane with care and to be aware of any unusual sounds. 

Propane tanks, in general, last significantly longer than oil or electric fuel sources, but overtime overuse and ageing can cause your propane tank to make noises. It’s possible that these noises are either coming from the propane tank itself or the gas line connected to it.

These sounds can represent different issues with your propane tank, and that’s why Budget Propane Ontario has listed the three most popular noises here:

1 - Knocking sounds

A knocking sound coming from your propane gas tank after it has been turned on usually means that the mixture of gas and air is uneven. By checking the flames you can easily establish whether this is the case or not.

If the flame is blue with a yellow tip then that indicates the correct measure. However, a yellow or white flame means that the mixture of gas and air is uneven and you should call a technician. A technician will be able to adjust how your propane tank controls airflow.

These issues are often not dangerous, however ignoring unusual noises creates the risk of ignoring further issues that develop. If you have any doubts about a noise it’s always a great idea to contact your propane supplier who can help further.

2 - Humming and gurgling sounds

A gurgling or humming noise after you have turned your gas on could mean that your propane tank has been overfilled. An overfilled tank puts excess pressure on the regulator and reduces the outflow from the tank. This could result in weak flames, low heat and discoloured pilot lights.

If this is a problem you are experiencing then you should contact your propane supplier. You should never try to drain the propane tank yourself.

Humming could also be caused by either trapped air or the vibrating of the regulator. Occasionally a pocket of air will become trapped inside the hose, or the rubber diaphragm on the regulation valve could vibrate.

3 - Hissing sounds

Hissing is the most common sound to come from propane tanks and is usually a sign of a gas leak. If you hear this noise you should turn your tank off and immediately call your propane supplier for a technician.

Any hissing noises coming from your propane tank should not be confused with the initial gas rush that you hear when you first turn your propane line on.

Propane is one of the safest energy sources you can use in your home or business. In fact, propane tanks are 20 times more puncture resistant thank tanks filled with ethanol, methanol or gasoline. Despite this, it’s always great to be aware of any unusual and new noises that didn’t exist before.

However, the strong pungent smell of rotten eggs that propane imitates should make detecting propane leaks easy.

If you have any propane questions, or simply want to inquire about deliveries, please contact Budget Propane Ontario today.

Get A No Obligation Quote

Sours: https://www.budgetpropaneontario.com/blog/3-propane-tank-noises-and-what-they-mean

Photograph of a natural gas regulator on a furnace Gas Regulator Noise Causes & Cures

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Gas appliance regulator noises & sounds:

Gas regulator noises may include humming, hissing, and other sounds. While many gas grill and some other appliance manufacturers say a bit of humming at the gas regulator for appliances is normal and harmless, not everyone agrees.

This article series explains LP or Natural Gas Pressure Regulators used on building appliances such as gas fired furnaces, boilers, water heaters, and stoves: How to Inspect & Test LP or Natural Gas Valves Regulators, or Gas Controls at Appliances.

We also provide an ARTICLE INDEX for this topic, or you can try the page top or bottom SEARCH BOX as a quick way to find information you need.

Gas Appliance or Gas-fired Heater Regulator or Control Noises

: if there is evidence of an LP or natural gas leak at a building, gas odors, for example, you should:

  • Do not do anything that is likely to cause a gas explosion, such as lighting a match, operating an electrical switch, or even using a telephone in the building
  • Leave the building immediately
  • Notify other building occupants of the safety concern
  • Contact the local gas company and/or fire department

Gas regulator noises: while many gas grill and some other appliance manufacturers say a bit of humming at the gas regulator for appliances is normal and harmless, not everyone agrees.

Certainly if there is a gas odor or gas leak, the gas supply should be shut off immediately and you need to call a professional for diagnosis and repair of the trouble. Some experts explain that over time a humming gas regulator may become unsafe; and there are other noises that have other meanings at gas regulators, pipes, and LP gas tanks.

[Click to enlarge any image]

Reader Question: buzzing noise from the gas regulator at my heater

2016/07/24 Wilycoyote said:

I have a Wayne natural gas burner insert that replaced my oil fired Beckett burner in my furnace. Occasionally there is a buzzing noise that is coming from the combination gas valve.

It is rare, intermittent, and stops after a minute or so, and usually does not reoccur this heat cycle. The flame looks normal and the heater operates normally before/during/after each event.

What is this? Is it dangerous? Does it mean the gas valve is failing?

There is nothing in the troubleshooting manual about this problem.

This question was posted originally at GAS BURNER FLAME & NOISE DEFECTS

Reply:

Wily:

I'm not expert on gas regulator noises but from reading advice from some appliance manufacturers and from several gas distribution companies I can suggest some regulator noises and their possible causes.

Watch out: But before going through noise sources, make darn sure that any hissing you hear is not a gas leak as a gas leak risks fire and explosion. If you suspect a gas leak shut down the gas supply immediately.

Some propane experts and propane industry websites such as propane101.com state:

An important point to note is that under normal operation, a propane regulator will make a "humming" noise. This is normal and should not be construed as a problem or regulator malfunction.

But as you’ll read below, some experts warn that over time a humming gas regulator that is not leaking and that is deemed “safe” may become unsafe as it may be damaged over time by vibration.

Let’s go through some noises and gas regulator noise sources:

  1. Buzzing due to electrical problems at or near the gas regulator: some appliance gas valves use a gas regulator that operates powered by a low-voltage transformer, perhaps at 24VAC. IF there is a loose wire or voltage defect the regulator would be unsafe in my opinion;

    Check for buzzing that is actually coming from a nearby low-voltage transformer. If that's the source, replace the transformer.
  2. Clanking noises at the gas regulator: One gas supplier we consulted mentioned a clanking sound in LP tanks traced to a loose gas level float assembly.
  3. Gurgling Humming at the gas regulator - Over-filled LP tank: can produce a humming or gurgling sound heard in the gas piping or at the regulator. This is a serious problem as it is sending excess pressure and possibly liquid fuel into an appliance regulator designed only for gas and lower pressure.

    Feeding fuel from an over-filled LP gas tank can also cause regulator damage as liquid LP can slug the regulator. According to some gas suppliers, an over-filled LP gas tank can actually cause abnormally low gas flow through the regulator and thus a reduced appliance gas flame.

    Watch out: DO NOT try to fix an over-fill problem yourself - trying to release excess LP gas can blow the place up or burn it down.
  4. Hissing sounds at the gas regulator (not everyone uses the same terms for the same sounds) may be from a gas leak. Sniff for gas - and have your system tested for gas leaks.

    Hissing also occurs through a ventilation hole that releases air from the atmospheric side of the gas regulator - this is normal but it should not be continuous. If you smell gas there is a leak: that would be unsafe - in that case shut off the gas.

    Hissing may also come from gas being released from a safety valve at the gas tank or regulator. That too indicates an unsafe condition.

    Watch out: If you smell gas - there is a gas leak - the system is unsafe; the gas supply should be shut off and then you should call for repair. The risk is fire or explosion.
  5. Humming, buzzing, hissing noise at the gas regulator: Diaphragm noise: Most-often humming or buzzing at a gas appliance regulator is traced to the gas regulator diaphragm. Some manufacturers (charbroil.com & napoleongrills.com for example) consider this normal as a function of variations in temperature, barometric pressure, and relative humidity and say ignore it.

    Weber, another gas grill manufacturer says the noise is safe as long as it’s not accompanied by a gas leak (or gas odor indicating a leak). But as you’ll see at the end of my notes, Zafer (2008) warns of possible regulator damage that could be unsafe.

    This is more likely to occur with LP gas systems than with piped-in natural gas systems.

    Try this: slightly close the gas supply valve; that won't change the system pressure but it'll restrict the gas flow slightly. If that makes the buzzing/humming noise stop you're probably seeing a regulator diaphragm. vibration issue.

    Most gas heater/appliance regulators use an internal rubber diaphragm. that might be damaged, perforated, or its spring may be sticking; in those cases the regulator needs repair or replacement.

    Watch out: if you smell gas, for example if gas is leaking through a perforated gas regulator diaphragm, the system is unsafe and should be shut down.
  6. Knocking and pinging sounds at the gas regulator: other gas appliance regulator noises include a knocking or pinging sound that can be caused by improper mixing of gas and air at the LP gas tank. If you see yellow or white-blue instead of mostly blue flames with a yellow tip then this may be the trouble. You’ll need to have your LP gas service tech inspect and repair the equipment.
  7. Various noise sources at the gas regulator - Air trapped in gas piping or water or rarely ice in the regulator: - that might be from a contaminated fuel source, possibly transient.

    If trapped air is the problem, purging the gas line between appliance regulator and tank ought to correct it.
  8. Various noise sources at the gas regulator - Dirt or debris in the regulator - ultimately that'll probably lead to its replacement

Watch out: Zafer (2008) points out that while humming and vibration at appliance gas regulators is a common problem, it is ultimately unsafe because the vibration in the regulator leads to component fatigue damage and regulator failure “if left unchecked”.

  • Zafer, Naci, and Greg R. Luecke. "Stability of gas pressure regulators."Applied Mathematical Modelling 32, no. 1 (2008): 61-82.
  • D.J. Kukulka, A. Benzoni, J.C. Mallendorf, Digital simulation of a pneumatic pressure regulator, Simulation (1994), pp. 252–266.
  • Dyck, R. I. J. "Residential gas regulators." Pipeline & gas journal 215, no. 7 (1988): 30-33.
  • Kam, Wng. "Measuring and reducing control valve noise pollution."Instrumentation & Control Systems 67, no. 11 (1994): 59-69.

A nauseating amount of information about gas regulators begins at InspectApedia at GAS REGULATORS & APPLIANCE / HEATER CONTROLS

Question: Diagnosing & Fixing a Buzzing Noise at a Gas Fired Water Heater

Buzzing noise at gas fired water heater (C) InspectApedia.com RSOur hot water heater is making the sound you hear in the attached video. The sound is intermittent. Do you have any idea what this could be? The water is hot. - Anonymous by private email 2017/01/13

BUZZING GAS FIRED WATER HEATER VIDEO [3MB .mp4 recording]

Reply:

To me that sounds like a buzzing sound right at the heater control or burner. This isn't a high-efficiency water heater, right?

I see what looks like a large black gas supply tube (to the burner) and a smaller diameter aluminum tube presumably feeding a pilot. Is that right?

Could there be a buzzing igniter?

Do you have other gas appliances and are they working normally? That'd reduce the chances of a problem at the gas supply or main gas regulator.

The system may be unsafe.

Also see GAS FLAME & NOISE DEFECTS

and for a more exhaustive list of sources of noises at water heaters see WATER HEATER NOISE.

Reader follow-up: replaced gas heater burner assembly

It was the only device acting up, and we had the burner assembly replaced, so all is good now. Throughout the off and on buzzing period, the unit continued to heat, and my friend, colleague & owner of our business was too distracted to take the action our regular plumber had recommended.

Eventually the buzzing stopped, and so did the heat. The repair cost approx $600, and apparently we had to replace the same burner assembly 2-3 years ago at this laundromat location.

Moderator follow-up comment:

To me that sounds like a failing control, probably an electrical component, or an igniter, though on occasion gas regulators can be noisy too. If a specific failure repeats itself I figure there's some underlying problem that's not yet been identified.

 

Reader Comments & Q&A

Cooling down of metal, of drips, not likely to be a gas leak as long as the fuel is off right at the tank.

Sometimes I see a bit of left-over gas in the gas line and burner that will "spit" and flame when the barbecue is first turned off, but never for more than a few seconds.

Our 3 year old Broil King was turned off after barbecuing tonite and the propane is turned off but the barbecue is making a regular 'spitting ' noise. A bit faster than a ticking clock. What could this be?

Smriti

Thank you for asking an interesting question. I apologize but I don't dare pronounce your system is safe based on an e text.

My gas cylinder was leaking so I changed the rubber , turns out that the rubber was broken so it was leaking . Now the smell doesn't come and the noise is also stopped but when I turn on the stove there is a gurgling type of rythmic noise still there is no smell of gas though . Is it safe ???

Bobby

I cannot diagnose the problem from your email,

But

Watch out, if there is a gas leak a fire or explosion, very dangerous, is at risk. Leave the gas off and from a safe location call for repair


I hear hissing from my regulator. Checked for leaks but don’t see any and my ignition also pops when I turn it on. However, the flame does light and no smell of gas. I am waiting on a replacement regulator but is it safe to use in the meantime? Again, no gas smell but hissing and all ignition pop. Flame is fine. Thank you

I have a two-stage propane regulator that is about ten years old. It has started making a very faint “knocking” sound every few seconds when my (thermocouple-regulated) Rinnai Bantam propane heater turns itself on when the temperature cycles too low. When the heater’s thermocouple gets warm enough, the heater turns the burners off and the regulator stops “knocking.” Thus, it is clearly the flow of propane through the regulator that is causing the noise. There is no smell of propane, and the heater seems to be working just, as it has for years, with a clean, blue pilot light. Your thoughts? Thank you!

Rick

I cannot tell from your question if the noise your hearing is mechanical such as a loose fan or motor mount or whether it is a noise at the burner flame itself. The ladder is likely to be more immediately and seriously dangerous and would mean that you should shut the system off and call for prompt repair. The concern is that incomplete or improper combustion can lead to the presence of unburned fuel and even a fuel explosion. Obviously I can't know exactly what's going on at your system but we need to err on the side of safety.

Bryant furnace,very noisy as soon as flame comes on till end of flame

With apologies that I can't access your system by text and don't have an idea what's happening I have to give the advice to be safe by turning the gas supply off to the heater.

when I keep regulator to the domestic cyclinder the sound is coming like air blast is it dangerous

Look and listen again.

More likely the noise is due to scale in your water heater

When the hot water heater burner is on here banging in the gas line

Bias

That sounds like a combustion or air supply or chimney problem but I can only guess as we have not a shred of information about your heater.

It is potentially dangerous. To be safest, I would turn the system off and call for emergency repair.

The furnace in my rv just started backfiring and humming/whistling noise what could this be?

Anon

The heater may be unsafe if there is a gas leak - in which case I would turn off the gas supply immediately and ventilate the home. (You'd smell gas). The risk is a fire or explosion.

If the hissing is a heating boiler (hot water heat) that's hissing as water is heated, the heater may be suffering a scale deposit problem. Call your heating service tech to have scale removed if that's the problem, or to help you diagnose a problem for which, sorry to say, with so little information I can only make wild guesses.

My wall mounted propane heater started making a hissing sound but is otherwise working fine. What could be the problem and is it unsafe?


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Technical Reviewers & References

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  • National Fuel Gas Code, ANSI Z223.1-yyyy - American Gas Association / National Fire Protection Association
  • LP-Gas Serviceman's Handbook,Fisher-Rosemount, Fisher Controls
  • National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Pamphlets No. 54 and 58.
  • Specifications for Gas Installations, Central Hudson Gas and Electric Corporation
  • "Gaslight", Gary Quilliam, The Old House Journal, March/April 1989 article describes fixtures, modern fixtures, and sources of supply.
  • Residential Gas Hot Water Heater Pocket Partner - Testing and Trouble Shooting, 19. State Corp., Ashland City, TN 37015

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Why Is Your Propane Tank Hissing?

Written on: April 27, 2018

Pondering man
If you hear a hissing sound coming from your propane tank, don’t immediately presume you have a propane leak (unless you smell a leak’s telltale rotten egg odor – in which case follow propane safety procedures immediately).
That fact is, that hissing sound may not be a propane leak at all. As our friends at propane101.com explain, several other culprits could be to blame, including:

  • An open bleeder valve – The bleeder valve – also called a liquid level gauge – is a small device that enables your delivery technician to accurately monitor how much propane is in the tank during a refill. To deliver your propane, your driver must open the bleeder valve; occasionally, it doesn’t close properly. If this is the case, simply turn the bleeder valve clockwise to stop the flow of gas.
  • An open relief valve – A pressure relief valve is a required feature on all propane tanks and cylinders, because propane expands when it’s heated. On a hot, sunny day, you may find that the relief valve is open (and hissing); that is because it is doing what it is designed to do on hot days – slowly release pressure built up by the propane, which expands when subjected to heat. Never try to close, look into, or tap an open relief valve! Instead, you can relieve some pressure in your tank by spraying cool water from a garden hose on the tank’s surface.
    If the hissing noise persists, you may have a propane gas leak – contact us immediately for service.

Keep your family safe in your propane-powered home by using your eyes, nose and ears! Learn more about propane safety here – or contact us with questions any time.

Sours: https://www.acerobbins.com/why-is-your-propane-tank-hissing/

Why Is My Propane Grill Tank Making Hissing Noises?

If you’ve ever hooked up a new propane gas tank and heard a faint hissing sound, your first thought is likely to be, uh oh—there’s a gas leak somewhere. Well, this may be true. Propane tanks will often hint at a slight leak by making a hissing sound, which gets louder as you get closer to the tank. But, there are a few other possible reasons your new tank isn’t working as expected. So next time you hear the hissing and suspect you might have a leaking propane tank on your hands, follow these tips to determine the cause.

Use Your Senses

If you hear a hissing noise, tune into your sense of smell too. If you smell gas, and you’ve checked the situation is safe, turn the cylinder valve clockwise to the off position. If you are unable to turn it off, leave the area and call your local fire department. In both cases, you’ll need to have a qualified service technician check out your grill for leaks. Generally, a humming sound without the smell of gas is normal.

Test for Leaks

If you suspect there may be a gas leak from the hose or connectors, and it is safe to do so, you can use a simple test to determine the leak. Prepare a solution of equal parts water and liquid dish soap. Ensure the cylinder valve on the gas tank is closed. Either pour into a spray bottle or use a grilling brush to apply the solution along the gas hose and connections. Open the cylinder valve, and examine the hose and gas line connections for soap bubbles. These bubbles indicate a leak. If you see bubbles, turn off the cylinder valve and replace or repair the area that is leaking by contacting a qualified service technician.

Close the Bleeder Valve

The bleeder valve, also called a fixed liquid level gauge, is typically opened by the delivery person when a tank is filled with propane. If the bleeder valve is not closed entirely, or was blocked from the inside when closed but is now cleared, this may be causing the noise. To fix this, turn the bleeder valve clockwise to ensure it is closed and stop the flow of gas.

Cool Down Your Tank

Propane tanks can build up extra pressure when they overheat due to expanding liquid in the tank. On extra hot days, the safety relief valve may open to release built up pressure in the tank. The pressure will remove the protective cap, opening the relief valve. It is crucial to not look into the relief valve or tap it with anything. You want to avoid the relief valve opening all the way. The easiest fix is to spray to tank with a water hose to cool it down, causing the relief valve to close entirely.

Make Sure You’re Setting Up Your Propane Tank Properly

To set up your propane tank, remove the grill cover entirely and position grill away from flammable materials. Make sure the gas is turned off and the used tank has been removed. Turn the service valve hand wheel to the right so it is turned off, and remove the plastic cap covering the nozzle. Snuggly connect the grill’s gas line to the nozzle, and turn the coupler to the right until everything is screwed in completely. Turn the gas valve on the propane tank to open.

Sours: https://www.myrecipes.com/cooking-method/grilled-recipes/why-is-my-propane-grill-tank-making-hissing-noises

Regulator gas hissing sound from lpg

Why Is My Propane Tank Humming?

Propane Tank NoisesIt doesn’t matter if you’re using a portable tank or a full-size home tank, propane tanks have the same basic components (they only change in complexity as the tank gets bigger).  Whether you’re firing up the grill in your backyard or simply turning on a gas-powered appliance inside your home, every proud propane proprietor will eventually hear strange sounds coming from the appliance, the gas line, or the tank itself.  An odd noise is usually a sign of a problem so we recommend keeping an eye out for these noises for both your safety and to protect the lifespan of your equipment.

Gurgling or Humming

When you turn on the gas, if you hear a low, gurgling rumble or similar humming noise, your tank may have been overfilled.  When a tank is overfilled, it puts excess pressure on the regulator, reducing outflow from the tank.  If you’re not getting enough propane at your destination (weak flames, low heat, discolored pilot lights), it’s likely that the tank was overfilled.  We do not recommend trying to drain a propane tank yourself.  If it’s a portable unit, return it to the retailer.  If the problem is with a permanent tank, contact your propane supplier.  Releasing propane can be dangerous, so please do not attempt it yourself. Sometimes, the regulator for your tank is the sole cause of a humming noise.  The regulation valve uses a rubber diaphragm which can vibrate under certain conditions.  When this vibration reaches it a certain level, it resonates and creates an audible humming noise.  Restricting the flow through the regulator slightly will sometimes fix this problem. One other source of humming is trapped air.  Occasionally, a pocket of air will get trapped inside the hose.  As propane rushes around the bubble it creates an audible humming noise.  While the air bubble itself is not dangerous, the humming noise can be very loud and annoying.  You also run the risk of becoming used to the noise and ignoring other issues that develop.  A simple line purge (included in the owner’s manual for your tank) will solve this.

Pinging or Knocking

If you turn on the gas and are greeted with a pinging or knocking noise you should get the unit inspected.  These noises are usually indicative of an uneven mixture of gas and air within the tank.  If you use a propane stove, you can double check this by examining the flames generated.  With the correct mixture, they should be blue with a yellow tip.  If the color is wrong (the flames are yellow or white-blue), then you should call a technician to adjust how your tank controls air-flow.

Clanking Sound

Sometimes you’ll hear a clanking sound from within the tank as it moves around or operates.  This is different from the loud knocking previously mentioned because it has a more physical impact-based sound.  If you’re hearing this noise, the level-measurement float inside your tank has probably come loose and is knocking against the inside of the container.  Swapping out the tank is the best course of action to alleviate the noise.

Hissing

Hissing is the most common noise you’ll hear from propane (and even natural gas) tanks.  Don’t confuse this for the initial gas rush you hear when you turn the line on.  Hissing usually comes from a gas leak.  Gas leaks are extremely dangerous and should be dealt with immediately.  For portable units, the problem may only be a damaged hose.  To identify if the hose is the problem, remove the hose and submerge it into a bucket of soapy water.  If bubbles form, then there is a hole in the line.  You could patch it, but it’s a better idea to simply replace the hose. On larger tanks, a feed line may not be the cause of the hissing.  If the hissing noise is coming from the tank itself you should check the bleeder and relief valves.  If the bleeder valve was left open the last time the tank was filled, simply closing it should shut off the hissing.  The relief valve will be covered by a large plastic cap, if this cap has come off it means that the relief valve is doing probably the source of the hissing.  Do not try to close the vale and do not stare into the valve.  The relief valve is there to help with pressure release and is operating properly.  Pressure usually builds up inside a propane tank on hot days.  Cooling the tank off with a water hose should lower the pressure and allow the relief valve to close normally.

Smell and Noise

Regardless of what noise your tank is making, if you smell gas escaping anywhere (at the tank, along a feed line, or in your home), you should shut down the gas line and call a repair technician immediately.  If you smell gas coming from a portable unit, it’s best to close the tank and take it to a refill or swap station to have it inspected or replaced.
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Sours: https://bouldenbrothers.com/2015/09/04/propane-noises/
Gas Regulators

Hissing Noise: What Should You Do?

Written on: October 6, 2020

Don’t panic. A hissing noise could be a sign of a leak, but it could also be caused by other harmless aspects of your propane tank.

Here’s how to tell if the hissing sound is a leak and how to react.

Check the Bleeder Valve

Have you recently received a propane delivery? If so, an open bleeder valve or fixed liquid level gauge could be to blame. Delivery technicians open these valves during the propane refilling process and, in some cases, they are not completely closed when the refill is finished. Turn the bleeder valve clockwise until it is completely closed and you can no longer turn it. If the hissing noise persists, continue reading.

Check the Relief Valve Cap

Is it a hot, sunny day? Check to see if the cap on your relief valve is open. If so, the valve is doing what it’s designed to do on hot days; slowly release pressure built up by the propane that expands when subjected to heat. The cap may have blown off due to the pressure. This safety feature is in place to protect against ruptures or explosions from expanding gas. If you see the cap open, do not look into the relief valve or tap it with anything. That can cause the valve to open all the way and release more pressure than is necessary. You can cool the tank by spraying water from your garden hose onto the tank’s surface. That should cause the relief valve to close. If the hissing noise persists, you may have a propane gas leak.

Gas Leak

Hissing can also be a symptom of a propane gas leak. If you smell gas, immediately evacuate the area and contact Lakes Gas. If you do not smell gas and have tried both above options and still hear hissing, you can easily check for a small leak yourself by spraying a solution of dish soap and water onto the gauge or other areas of the tank where you suspect a leak. If you see bubbles, you have a leak. The larger the bubbles, the larger the size of the leak. If you do find a leak, contact Lakes Gas to arrange for repairs.

Additionally, if you are looking for a new residential propane provider in Minnesota or Wisconsin, Lakes Gas can help.

Sours: https://www.lakesgas.com/hissing-noise-what-should-you-do/

Now discussing:

If you've ever hooked up a new propane gas tank and heard a faint hissing sound, your first thought is likely to be, uh oh—there's a gas leak somewhere. Well, this may be true. Propane tanks will often hint at a slight leak by making a hissing sound, which gets louder as you get closer to the tank.


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Similarly, should my grill propane tank hiss?

Hissing is the most common noise you'll hear from propane (and even natural gas) tanks. If the hissing noise is coming from the tank itself you should check the bleeder and relief valves. If the bleeder valve was left open the last time the tank was filled, simply closing it should shut off the hissing.

Beside above, should a gas regulator hiss? Hissing also occurs through a ventilation hole that releases air from the atmospheric side of the gas regulator - this is normal but it should not be continuous. If you smell gas there is a leak: that would be unsafe - in that case shut off the gas.

Beside this, why does my gas meter hiss?

A hissing sound isn't often present either. That's why your energy company adds a harmless but smelly chemical to the gas. The gas supplied to your home will smell like sulphur, or rotten eggs, to help you identify gas leaks. hear a whistling or hissing sound near a gas line or meter.

Can a propane tank explode?

Propane tanks do not explode. This is not the case whatsoever and people should understand that a propane tank, operating under normal circumstances will not explode or rupture. Safety devices and mechanisms are in place to prevent explosions, accidents and propane tank ruptures or breaches.

Sours: https://findanyanswer.com/is-a-propane-grill-supposed-to-hiss


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