Windows 10 20h2

Windows 10 20h2 DEFAULT

The new light start menu tiles on Windows 10's 20H2 update.

Windows 10’s October 2020 Update, also known as the 20H2 update, is here. This update is focused on bug and performance fixes, but it has some larger changes—like the removal of the System Control Panel.

This article is up-to-date with the latest changes as of the final version of the 20H2 update, released on October 20, 2020. It’s also known as Windows 10 version 2009, and it has a build number of 19042.572.

How to Install the Update Now

To install the update the official way, head to Settings > Update & Security > Windows Update. Click “Check for Updates.” If the update is available for your PC, you’ll see “Feature update to Windows 10, version 20H2” here. Click “Download and install” to get it.

If the update isn’t available for your PC, that suggests Microsoft isn’t confident it will perform well on your PC’s hardware yet. To install the update anyway, download and run Microsoft’s Update Assistant tool. Head to the Download Windows 10 page and click “Update now” to get it.

Warning: Running this tool skips the gradual rollout process. You may encounter bugs with the update on your PC’s hardware if you use it. We recommend you wait for the update to be offered to your PC via Windows Update before you install it.

RELATED:How to Install Windows 10's October 2020 Update (20H2)

There’s Not a Lot New, and That’s Big News!

Windows 10’s October 2020 Update (version 20H2) does offer some notable changes—the classic System pane in the Control Panel is vanishing—but mostly features smaller changes. That’s very exciting.

Sure, we had a smaller update last year with 19H2 (the November 2019 Update) followed by a larger update with 20H1 (the May 2020 Update). But Microsoft insisted that there was no plan to do a small update followed by a large update each year. This time around, 20H2 easily could have been another big release packed full of features. Instead, Microsoft is taking the existing 20H1 update and polishing it even further.

This update should be plenty stable because of all that effort going into polishing and bug-fixing. That’s good news for Windows 10 users.

That’s our Microsoft-to-English translation of what’s going on, anyway. Here’s how Microsoft phrases it: “Windows 10 version 20H2 will offer a scoped set of features to improve performance and enhance quality.”

This update will be fast to install, just like 19H2 was. If you’re already running the May 2020 Update (20H1), installing it will be as fast as installing a normal monthly update—no long download or lengthy reboot required.

Microsoft Removed the System Control Panel

Windows 10's Settings > System > About page.

In this version of Windows, the classic “System” page in the Control Panel has been removed. When you try to open it, you’ll be taken to the About page in the new Settings app.

This isn’t as big a deal as it sounds. All the information found in the Settings pane in Control Panel is available in the Settings app. There’s a convenient “Copy” button to copy all the text to your clipboard, and you’ll even find buttons for opening advanced system settings like BitLocker settings and Device Manager at the bottom of the page.

This is just another step in Microsoft’s long, slow process of slowly phasing out the Control Panel. The Control Panel won’t vanish any time soon, though—it has too many useful options and Microsoft is migrating them to the new Settings app very slowly.

RELATED:Don't Worry: Windows 10's Control Panel Is Safe (For Now)

The New Microsoft Edge Is Now Built-In

The New Tab page in the new Microsoft Edge browser.

Microsoft is proud that this is the first version of Windows 10 with the new, Chromium-based Microsoft Edge browser included.

That’s not necessarily big news—Windows Update may already have installed the new Microsoft Edge on your system, anyway. The new Edge has also been available to download from the web since January 15, 2020. But, with this release, it’s official: The new Edge replaces the old Edge in the baseline version of Windows 10.

RELATED:What You Need to Know About the New Microsoft Edge Browser

Access Your Samsung Phone’s Android Apps on Your PC

Instagram for Android running on Windows 10 via a Samsung Android phone.

Microsoft is expanding the “Your Phone” app with more features designed for “select Samsung devices.” If you have one of these phones, you can now access your phone’s Android apps directly on your Windows 10 PC. They’ll be running on your phone but you can launch, see, and interact with them on your Windows 10 desktop.

In the future, Microsoft says it will go even further:

Later in the year, Samsung Galaxy Note20 users will experience the power and convenience of running multiple apps side by side and we will continue to work with Samsung to bring this feature to additional devices. Apps will launch in separate windows enabling you to interact with multiple apps at the same time.

Microsoft’s website offers more information about the “Apps” feature, including a full list of supported devices that can use the “Apps feature.”

RELATED:Why Android Users Need Windows 10's "Your Phone" App

The Start Menu’s Theme Better Matches Windows 10’s New Icons


Microsoft

The Start menu is getting “theme-aware tiles.” Now, the tile background will be light or dark to match whichever Windows 10 theme you’re using—light or dark.

Previously, the Start menu used your accent color, which means the default Windows 10 theme used a variety of blue icons on a blue background. The shift to using standard theme colors means Windows 10’s new application icons look better in the Start menu.

You can still get those tiles that match your theme back, however. Just head to Settings > Personalization > Color, enable dark mode (or at least enable dark for “your default Windows mode,”) and tell Windows to show the accent color on “Start, taskbar, and action center.”

RELATED:How to Enable Windows 10's New Light Theme

Alt+Tab Shows Edge Browser Tabs by Default

Edge Alt+Tab options under Settings > System > Multitasking.

Windows 10 now shows browser tabs in your Alt+Tab switcher—if you use Edge. Instead of just showing one Edge thumbnail for each browser window, you’ll see a number of different tabs in the Alt+Tab switcher. So, if you’re using several web pages at once, you can quickly find and switch between them just with Alt+Tab.

If you don’t like this, that’s fine—it’s configurable. Head to Settings > System > Multitasking and you configure Alt+Tab to show your most recent three or five tabs—or turn it off completely and get a more classic Alt+Tab experience.

Presumably, other browsers like Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox could choose to integrate with the Alt+Tab switcher in the future and show browser tabs, too. After all, the new Edge shares its open-source Chromium codebase with Google Chrome.

RELATED:Windows 10 Will Soon Show Edge Browser Tabs in Alt+Tab

Enhancements to Taskbar Pinned Sites in Edge

Microsoft has been making pinned sites on the taskbar work better, too. When you pin a website to your taskbar using Microsoft Edge, you can now click (or mouse-over) that taskbar icon to see all your browser tabs for that website.

So, if you pin Gmail to your taskbar in Edge and you have Gmail tabs open in several browser windows, you can click the Gmail icon to find them—even if they’re buried in other Edge browser windows.

RELATED:How to Pin a Website to the Windows 10 Taskbar or Start Menu

No More Noisy Focus Assist Notifications

A "Focus Assist on" tool-tip message from Windows 10's taskbar.

If you’ve used Windows 10’s Focus Assist feature—which automatically hides notifications while you’re playing games and using other full-screen applications, among other tasks—you’ll probably notice that it can be really noisy.

In the spirit of not bugging you with notifications, Focus Assist pops up to show you a notification that hey, it’s not going to show you any notifications! And, when you’re done with your “focused” activity, Focus Assist pops up a summary of all the notifications it didn’t show you. It’s pretty distracting.

Now, Microsoft is disabling all these Focus Assist notifications by default, although you can still re-enable them in Settings.

RELATED:How to Disable Windows 10's Annoying Focus Assist Notifications

Refresh Rate Options in Settings

Refresh Rate options in Windows 10 Settings

You can now change your PC’s refresh rate in the Settings app—without visiting the old Control Panel. To find this option, head to Settings > System > Display > Advanced Display Settings. You’ll see a Refresh Rate option at the bottom of the window.

If you have a monitor with a high refresh rate, you should crank it up for a smoother visual experience.

Automatic Tablet Mode Switching by Default

Tablet options under Settings > System > Tablet on Windows 10.

When you detached a keyboard on a 2-in-1 device, a notification popped up and asked you if you wanted to enable tablet mode. Now, Windows will automatically switch to the new tablet experience added in the May 2020 Update without the prompt or notification.

You can change what happens—for example, to prevent Windows 10 from entering tablet mode automatically—by heading to Settings > System > Tablet.

Smaller Changes

Most of these changes are pretty small, but some are really small. Here are a few other ones:

  • Notification enhancements: Windows 10’s notifications now include an application logo so you can easily see which application generated them and an “x” button so you can quickly dismiss them.
  • Default taskbar icon tweaks: In a minor change, Windows 10 will adjust the default taskbar icon layout depending on what you use your PC for. If you link an Android phone during setup, you’ll see a Your Phone icon on the taskbar. If you have an Xbox Live account and you’re using a gaming PC, you’ll see an Xbox icon on the taskbar. You can still add or remove whatever icons you like.
  • Modern Device Management (MDM) improvements: For IT professionals administering multiple devices, Microsoft is extending Modern Device Management policy with new “Local Users and Groups” settings that matches the options available for devices managed through Group Policy.

As usual, Microsoft also fixed a wide variety of smaller performance and stability issues under the hood.

More features are arriving in Windows 10’s 21H1 update, arriving sometime in Spring 2021. For example, Windows 10 is getting system-wide support for DNS Over HTTPS (DoH), boosting security and privacy online.

RELATED:What's New in Windows 10's May 2021 Update (21H1), Available Now

Sours: https://www.howtogeek.com/684812/whats-new-in-windows-10s-20h2-update-arriving-fall-2020/

Windows 10, version 20H2 and Windows Server, version 20H2

  • 9 minutes to read

Find information on known issues and the status of the rollout for Windows 10, version 20H2 and Windows Server, version 20H2. Looking for a specific issue? Press CTRL + F (or Command + F if you are using a Mac) and enter your search term(s). Want the latest Windows release health updates? Follow @WindowsUpdate on Twitter.

Current status as of May 18, 2021

Windows 10, version 20H2 is designated for broad deployment. The recommended servicing status is Semi-Annual Channel.

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Known issues

This table offers a summary of current active issues and those issues that have been resolved in the last 30 days.


Issue details

October 2021

Custom printing properties might not be correctly provided to print server clients

StatusOriginating updateHistory
Resolved KB5006670OS Build 19042.1266
KB5005611
2021-09-30
Resolved: 2021-10-12, 10:00 PT
Opened: 2021-10-13, 12:28 PT

After installing KB5005611 on a print server, printing properties defined on that server might not be correctly provided to clients. Note this issue is specific to print servers and does not impact standard network printing. This issue will not cause printing operations to fail, however, custom settings defined on the server – for example, duplex print settings – will not be applied automatically, and clients will print with default settings only.

This issue results from an improper building of the data file which contains the printer properties. Clients which receive this data file will not be able to use the file content and will instead proceed with default printing settings. Clients who have previously received the settings package prior to the installation of KB5005611 are unaffected. Servers which use default print settings and have no custom settings to provide to clients are unaffected.

Note: The printer connection methods described in this issue are not commonly used by devices designed for home use. The printing environments affected by this issue are more commonly found in enterprises and organizations.

Workaround: IT administrators with admin privileges can still install printer drivers on the client through other means, such as copying packaged drivers from a known good package location. Additionally, clients can still be modified manually to adopt desired printer settings.

Resolution: This issue was resolved in  KB5006670.

Affected platforms:

  • Client: Windows 10, version 21H1; Windows 10, version 20H2; Windows 10, version 2004; Windows 10, version 1909; Windows 10, version 1809; Windows 10, version 1607; Windows 10 Enterprise 2015 LTSB; Windows 8.1; Windows 7 SP1; Windows 11, version 21H2
  • Server: Windows Server 2022; Windows Server, version 20H2; Windows Server, version 2004; Windows Server, version 1909; Windows Server, version 1809; Windows Server 2016; Windows Server 2012; Windows Server 2008 SP2

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Installation of printers via Internet Printing Protocol (IPP) might not succeed

StatusOriginating updateHistory
ConfirmedOS Build 19042.1237
KB5005565
2021-09-14
Last updated: 2021-10-13, 16:16 PT
Opened: 2021-10-13, 12:32 PT

After installing KB5005565, installation of printers using Internet Printing Protocol (IPP) might not complete successfully. Devices which had connected to and installed the printer prior to the installation of KB5005565 are unaffected and print operations to that printer will succeed as usual.

Note: IPP is not commonly used by devices designed for home use. The printing environments affected by this issue are more commonly found in enterprises and organizations.

Next steps: Microsoft is working on a resolution and targeting its release in a future update.

Affected platforms:

  • Client: Windows 10, version 21H1; Windows 10, version 20H2; Windows 10, version 2004; Windows 10, version 1809; Windows 11, version 21H2; Windows 10, version 1909
  • Server: Windows Server, version 20H2; Windows Server, version 2004; Windows Server, version 1809; Windows Server 2022; Windows Server, version 1909

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Installation of printers might fail when attempted over some network connections

StatusOriginating updateHistory
Resolved KB5005611OS Build 19042.1237
KB5005565
2021-09-14
Resolved: 2021-09-30, 14:00 PT
Opened: 2021-10-13, 12:26 PT

After installing KB5005565, devices which attempt to connect to a network printer for the first time might fail to download and install the necessary printer drivers. Devices which had connected to and installed the printer prior to the installation of KB5005565 are unaffected and operations to that printer will succeed as usual.

This issue has been observed in devices which access printers via a print server using HTTP connections. When a client connects to the server to install the printer, a directory mismatch occurs, which causes the installer files to generate incorrectly. As a result, the drivers may not download.

Note: The printer connection methods described in this issue are not commonly used by devices designed for home use. The printing environments affected by this issue are more commonly found in enterprises and organizations.

Workaround: IT administrators with admin privileges can still install printer drivers on the client through other means, such as copying packaged drivers from a known good package location. Only the automatic download and installation processes are impacted by this issue.

Resolution: This issue was resolved in  KB5005611.

Affected platforms:

  • Client: Windows 10, version 21H1; Windows 10, version 20H2; Windows 10, version 2004; Windows 10, version 1909; Windows 10, version 1809; Windows 10, version 1607; Windows 10 Enterprise 2015 LTSB; Windows 8.1; Windows 7 SP1; Windows 11, version 21H2
  • Server: Windows Server 2022; Windows Server, version 20H2; Windows Server, version 2004; Windows Server, version 1909; Windows Server, version 1809; Windows Server 2016; Windows Server 2012; Windows Server 2008 SP2

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September 2021

Apps might fail to open, close unexpectedly or become unresponsive

StatusOriginating updateHistory
ResolvedOS Build 19042.1202
KB5005101
2021-09-01
Resolved: 2021-10-01, 17:22 PT
Opened: 2021-09-24, 11:00 PT

After installing KB5005101 or a later update on devices using Microsoft Exploit Protection Export Address Filtering (EAF), you might have issues with some applications. You might be experiencing this issue if apps fail to open, fail to open files, or you might receive a white window when attempting to login.

Affected platforms:

  • Client: Windows 10, version 21H1; Windows 10, version 20H2; Windows 10, version 2004; Windows 10, version 1909; Windows 10, version 1809; Windows 10 Enterprise LTSC 2019
  • Server: Windows Server 2022; Windows Server, version 20H2; Windows Server, version 2004; Windows Server, version 1909; Windows Server, version 1809; Windows Server 2019

Resolution: This issue is resolved using Known Issue Rollback (KIR). Please note that it might take up to 24 hours for the resolution to propagate automatically to consumer devices and non-managed business devices. Restarting your Windows device might help the resolution apply to your device faster. For enterprise-managed devices that have installed an affected update and encountered this issue, it can be resolved by installing and configuring a special Group Policy (preferred) or setting a registry key according to the version of Windows you are using. Important Verify that you are using the correct Group Policy or registry key for your version of Windows.

Group Policy (preferred):

For help, please see How to use Group Policy to deploy a Known Issue Rollback. For general information on using Group Policies, see Group Policy Overview. Note Devices need to be restarted after configuring the special Group Policy or adding the registry key. 

Registry Key:

1, Open a Command Prompt window (cmd.exe) with elevated permissions.

2, Type the following command depending on which Windows version you are using and then press Enter.

Windows Sever 2022: reg add HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Policies\Microsoft\FeatureManagement\Overrides /v 2801335948 /t REG_DWORD /d 0 /f Windows 10, version 2004, Windows 10, version 20H2 and Windows 10, version 21H1: reg add HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Policies\Microsoft\FeatureManagement\Overrides /v 2767781516 /t REG_DWORD /d 0 /f Windows 10, version 1909: reg add HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Policies\Microsoft\FeatureManagement\Overrides /v 928713355 /t REG_DWORD /d 0 /f Windows 10, version 1809, Windows Server 2019: reg add HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Policies\Microsoft\FeatureManagement\Overrides /v 2371422858 /t REG_DWORD /d 0 /f

3, All version of Windows require a restart of the device for the registry key to take effect. Before restarting Windows 10, version 1909, Windows 10, version 1809 and Windows Server 2019, you will need to also run following command from elevated PowerShell prompt:

Get-ScheduledTask -TaskName "ReconcileFeatures" | Start-ScheduledTask

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Administrator credentials required every time apps attempt to print

StatusOriginating updateHistory
Resolved ExternalOS Build 19042.1165
KB5005033
2021-08-10
Last updated: 2021-09-16, 18:23 PT
Opened: 2021-09-16, 18:11 PT

After installing KB5005033 or a later update, certain printers in some environments using Point and Print might receive a prompt saying, "Do you trust this printer" and requiring administrator credentials to install every time an app attempts to print to a print server or a print client connects to a print server. This is caused by a print driver on the print client and the print server using the same filename, but the server has a newer version of the file. When the print client connects to the print server, it finds a newer driver file and is prompted to update the drivers on the print client, but the file in the package it is offered for installation does not include the later file version.

Workaround: Verify that you are using the latest drivers for all your printing devices and where possible, use the same version of the print driver on the print client and print server.

Affected platforms:

  • Client: Windows 10, version 21H1; Windows 10, version 20H2; Windows 10, version 2004; Windows 10, version 1909; Windows 10, version 1809; Windows 10 Enterprise LTSC 2019; Windows 10 Enterprise LTSC 2016; Windows 10, version 1607; Windows 10 Enterprise 2015 LTSB; Windows 8.1; Windows 7 SP1
  • Server: Windows Server 2022; Windows Server, version 20H2; Windows Server, version 2004; Windows Server, version 1909; Windows Server, version 1809; Windows Server 2019; Windows Server 2016; Windows Server 2012 R2; Windows Server 2012; Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1; Windows Server 2008 SP2

Resolution: This issue is resolved externally by adjusting the print drivers in your environment. If updating drivers in your environment does not resolve the issue, please contact support for your printer manufacturer (OEM). For more information, see the Q1/A1 in the "Frequently asked questions" section of KB5005652.

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Sours: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/release-health/status-windows-10-20h2
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Windows 10 20H2 (October 2020 Update) is now broadly available as an optional update. If your device is known to have a good installation experience, it will be available through the Windows Update settings page.

However, since you are now in control of upgrading new feature updates, the question remains whether you should install it now or wait some additional time. The reason is that it’s a known fact that during the early days, devices have higher chances of running into problems.

In this guide, we will try to determine whether you should install or skip Windows 10 20H2.

Is it safe to install version 20H2?

According to Microsoft, the best and short answer is “Yes,” the October 2020 Update is stable enough for installation. However, the company is currently limiting the availability, which indicates that the feature update still not fully compatible with many hardware configurations. Also, at the health dashboard website, the software giant has revealed some problems during the rollout. For example, as part of the known issues, there are some audio driver problems. An issue that causes the loss of system and user certificates when upgrading using the Media Creation Tool, Update Assistant, or ISO file. However, the problems are not as serious as we’ve seen with previous releases.

Also, the answer to whether you should install this version depends on the release already installed on your computer. If the device is already running version 2004, you can install version 20H2 with minimal to no risks. The reason is that both versions of the operating system share the same core file system. As a result, the new features have already been deployed in an inactive state. The system only needs a small “enablement package” to activate the new version with a quick reboot that doesn’t require reinstallation.

Using the enablement package approach significantly reduces the number of problems you may see using an in-place upgrade or clean installation. However, it does not resolve the problems with the feature update. Although the new operating system does not seem to have major issues thus far, you may still encounter isolated problems with the new changes.

On the other hand, if you’re running an older release, such as the November 2019 Update (version 1909), you may also be able to upgrade, but you should proceed with more caution.

Usually, upgrading from an older release available in a previous year requires full reinstallation, and this process can cause a lot of unexpected problems. In addition to possible unknown and known issues as a result of new changes in the new development, you can also come across software and compatibility problems if the device has out of date drivers, poorly designed apps, programs designed for an old version of the operating system, or security software.

Should I wait to install version 20H2?

When a new version of Windows 10 becomes available, it’s never a good idea to rush the upgrade since it’s known that during the initial rollout of a new release, unknown bugs, errors, and compatibility problems are expected. 

Once a new version of the operating system releases, you’ll receive a notification in the Windows Update settings letting you know if the update is ready on your device. If you don’t see the notification, you shouldn’t try to force it using the Media Creation Tool or Update Assistant because you’re likely to run into issues, such as “This PC can’t be upgraded to Windows 10,” “This PC can’t be upgraded to this version of Windows 10 because of a service or driver that’s not ready yet,” or similar errors.

When a new feature update becomes available, it’s always recommended to wait for at least three to four quality updates before planning the upgrade.

If the device uses an older version of the operating system and it’s not experiencing any issues, you should wait a little longer. However, you shouldn’t skip the update completely. Eventually, the version on the computer will be discontinued and no longer will receive security and improvement updates, which could lead to other problems and make the device vulnerable to attacks.

Update May 12, 2021: As Microsoft resolves the last standing known issues with version 20H2 and 2004, it should now be safe to upgrade to these versions from older version 1909 or older releases.

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Sours: https://pureinfotech.com/should-install-windows-10-20h2-now/

What's new in Windows 10, version 20H2 for IT Pros

Applies to

This article lists new and updated features and content that is of interest to IT Pros for Windows 10, version 20H2, also known as the Windows 10 October 2020 Update. This update also contains all features and fixes included in previous cumulative updates to Windows 10, version 2004.

Note

With this release and future releases, the Windows 10 release nomenclature is changing from a year and month pattern (YYMM) to a year and half-year pattern (YYH1, YYH2).

As with previous fall releases, Windows 10, version 20H2 is a scoped set of features for select performance improvements, enterprise features, and quality enhancements. As an H2-targeted release, 20H2 is serviced for 30 months from the release date for devices running Windows 10 Enterprise or Windows 10 Education editions.

To download and install Windows 10, version 20H2, use Windows Update (Settings > Update & Security > Windows Update). For more information, including a video, see How to get the Windows 10 October 2020 Update.

Microsoft Edge

This release automatically includes the new Chromium-based Microsoft Edge browser instead of the legacy version of Edge. For more information, see the Microsoft Edge documentation.

Servicing

Windows Update

There are several changes that help improve the security of devices that scan Windows Server Update Services (WSUS) for updates. For more information, see Changes to improve security for Windows devices scanning WSUS.

Starting with Windows 10, version 20H2, LCUs and SSUs have been combined into a single cumulative monthly update, available via Microsoft Catalog or Windows Server Update Services. For more information, see Simplifying on-premises deployment of servicing stack updates.

Deployment

New guidance is available to help prepare a servicing strategy and move your devices to the latest version of Windows 10 quickly and as seamlessly as possible.

Activities are grouped into the following phases: Plan > Prepare > Deploy:

Plan your deployment by evaluating and understanding essential activities:

Prepare your devices and environment for deployment by performing necessary actions:

Deploy and manage Windows 10 strategically in your organization:

Windows Autopilot

Enhancements to Windows Autopilot since the last release of Windows 10 include:

  • Windows Autopilot for HoloLens: Set up HoloLens 2 devices with Windows Autopilot for HoloLens 2 self-deploying mode.
  • Windows Autopilot with co-management: Co-management and Autopilot together can help you reduce cost and improve the end user experience.
  • Enhancements to Windows Autopilot deployment reporting are in preview. From the Microsoft Endpoint Manager admin center (endpoint.microsoft.com), select Devices > Monitor and scroll down to the Enrollment section. Click Autopilot deployment (preview).

Windows Assessment and Deployment Toolkit (ADK)

There is no new ADK for Windows 10, version 20H2. The ADK for Windows 10, version 2004 will also work with Windows 10, version 20H2. For more information, see Download and install the Windows ADK.

Device management

Modern Device Management (MDM) policy is extended with new Local Users and Groups settings that match the options available for devices managed through Group Policy.

For more information about what's new in MDM, see What's new in mobile device enrollment and management

Security

Microsoft Defender for Endpoint

This release includes improved support for non-ASCII file paths for Microsoft Defender Advanced Threat Protection (ATP) Auto Incident Response (IR).

The DisableAntiSpyware parameter is deprecated in this release.

Microsoft Defender Application Guard for Office

Microsoft Defender Application Guard now supports Office: With Microsoft Defender Application Guard for Office, you can launch untrusted Office documents (from outside the Enterprise) in an isolated container to prevent potentially malicious content from compromising your device.

Windows Hello

With specialized hardware and software components available on devices shipping with Windows 10, version 20H2 configured out of factory, Windows Hello now offers added support for virtualization-based security with supporting fingerprint and face sensors. This feature isolates and secures a user's biometric authentication data.

Virtualization

Windows Sandbox

New policies for Windows Sandbox are available in this release. For more information, see Policy CSP - WindowsSandbox.

Windows Virtual Desktop (WVD)

Note: WVD is not tied directly to a Windows 10 release, but it is included here as an evolving capability of Windows.

New capabilities in WVD were announced at Ignite 2020. For more information, see Announcing new management, security, and monitoring capabilities in Windows Virtual Desktop.

In addition, Windows Virtual Desktop is now generally available in the Azure Government cloud.

Windows Shell

Some enhancements to the Windows 10 user interface are implemented in this release:

  • With this release, the solid color behind tiles on the Start menu is replaced with a partially transparent background. Tiles are also theme-aware.
  • Icons on the Start menu no longer have a square outline around each icon.
  • Notifications are slightly updated in appearance.
  • You can now change the monitor refresh rate on advanced display settings.
  • Alt+Tab now shows Edge browser tabs by default. You can edit this setting under Settings > System > Multitasking: Alt+Tab.
  • The System control panel under System and Security has been updated to the Settings > About page. Links to Device Manager, Remote desktop, System protection, Advanced system settings, and Rename this PC are moved to the About page.

2-in-1 PCs

On a 2-in-1 device, Windows will now automatically switch to tablet mode when you detach the screen.

Surface

Windows 10 Pro and Enterprise are now available on Surface Hub 2. For more information, see What's new in Surface Hub 2S for IT admins.

Desktop Analytics

Desktop Analytics is a cloud-connected service, integrated with Configuration Manager that provides data-driven insights to the management of Windows endpoints in your organization. Desktop Analytics requires a Windows E3 or E5 license, or a Microsoft 365 E3 or E5 license.

For information about Desktop Analytics and this release of Windows 10, see What's new in Desktop Analytics.

See Also

What’s new for IT pros in Windows 10, version 20H2
Get started with the October 2020 update to Windows 10
Learn Windows 10 with the October 2020 Update
What's New in Windows Server: New and updated features in Windows Server.
Windows 10 Features: General information about Windows 10 features.
What's New in Windows 10: See what’s new in other versions of Windows 10.
Announcing more ways we’re making app development easier on Windows: Simplifying app development in Windows.
Features and functionality removed in Windows 10: Removed features.
Windows 10 features we’re no longer developing: Features that are not being developed.

Sours: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/whats-new/whats-new-windows-10-version-20h2

20h2 windows 10

Windows 10 20H2: Here's why you'll need to upgrade

istock-1176842853-2.jpg

October is here, and it's time for the second 2020 release of Windows 10. As pioneered in 2019, this is a smaller release than the 2004 update, adding stability features and prioritising a longer support model than the consumer- and early adopter-focused update. With 30 months of servicing, the H2 builds have a closer fit with common enterprise support lifecycles.

That shift in Windows development models worked well in 2019 and looks set to perform similarly in 2020. Microsoft was justly criticised for delaying the 20H1 release for many PCs, including its flagship Surface hardware, while it worked out some compatibility issues, but that won't be the case with 20H2, as it's built on top of the now fully available earlier release. In fact, if you're already running version 2004 you have most of the bits for 20H2 already installed as part of the monthly cumulative updates. All that's needed is for Microsoft to send an update that throws the right registry switches to turn on the new features.

SEE: Microsoft Build 2020 Highlights (TechRepublic Premium)

It's important to note that, if you are using PCs that are managed by companies that have opted-in to only accept updates from the annual H2 cycle, then you won't have the 20H2 bits pre-installed, and any update will require a full OS update rather than the quicker process for existing 2004 users. However, you will still get the benefit of telemetry from those users, as it will have allowed Microsoft to keep issues to a minimum -- especially hardware and driver problems that might otherwise prevent a successful install.

So what's in the 20H2 release? The obvious changes are a new Start menu and the switch to the new Chromium-based Edge as the default browser.

windows-10-20h2-start.jpg

Refreshing icons and Start

Windows 10's Start Menu has changed a lot since the initial release, and 20H2's change is perhaps the biggest yet, as it's intended to show off Microsoft's new Fluent Design icons as well as improving support for Windows 10's Dark and Light modes. Most of Microsoft's own applications now have icons that support the new modes, and the resulting combination of translucent tiles and new icon designs works surprisingly well. The new Fluent icons are used in the taskbar and Start menu app list, for a more consistent look-and-feel.

There's still an option to use your own colour scheme, but you'll have to switch to dark mode first before working through the customisation features in the Settings app. In practice, it's a lot easier to switch to one of the two default modes, as they're where Microsoft will be concentrating its user experience work in future.

Microsoft has tweaked Notifications, removing the annoying notification that popped up when you switched into focus mode. The layout of the notification bar and notification pop-ups is improved, with icons to help you identify what application generated which notification. Similarly, the new desktop-focused tablet mode becomes the default, removing one of the last vestiges of Windows 8's UI. You won't find tablet mode on desktops or laptops without touch support, so you can't get into it by accident on systems that don't work with it.

windows-10-20h2-notifications.jpg

New Edge by default

The new Edge has evolved a lot since its first public release in 2019. It's a solid browser, and as it's based on the same Chromium open-source code base as Google's Chrome you should find fewer compatibility issues with web applications. Microsoft has added many of its own features to Edge, including Collections, a way to save groups of tabs and share them with colleagues. There's support for older sites on your network with an embedded Internet Explorer 11 mode that launches IE in an Edge tab. IE Mode is only for intranet sites, and you need to set up and manage a list of addresses. It's intended as an interim only, while you update sites for the new browser.

If you prefer the older EdgeHTML-based version of Edge, you need to set the appropriate registry settings and group policies before any updates install, otherwise the new Edge will be installed with the old browser no longer accessible to users. There is a new first-use experience that handles account migration from older browsers, including non-Microsoft browsers, so users will need to be aware that this will happen and how to cancel account migrations if they prefer to stick with Chrome or Firefox as their default browsers.

The new Edge gets deeper integration into Windows 10 too, with support for viewing and navigating browser tabs in the Windows 10 Alt+Tab task switcher. You will see all current tabs by default or, if you prefer, you can tune the number of recent tabs shown in the Settings Multitasking section.

windows-10-20h2-alt-tab.jpg

The Settings migration continues

Windows 10's Settings app is intended to replace the old Windows Control Panel over time. It's been a slow process, with one or two settings moving over with each update. This time most of the changes are in the core System section of the app. Now you can drill into advanced settings for displays, changing refresh rates where possible. At the same time, there's now the option of copying system details from the About section, making it easier for users to submit information as part of service requests. That means that the old System section of the Control Panel is now gone, as all its features are in Settings.

SEE: Top Windows 10 run commands (free PDF) (TechRepublic)

New installs get an improved set of default applications in the taskbar. If you're logging in with a Microsoft account, Windows 10 uses your choice of services and devices to pin icons -- if you're using an Android phone and have linked it to your Windows account, it will automatically pin Your Phone, for example. If you're updating an existing install, your taskbar icons won't change.

Ready to test

Microsoft recently made the current preview builds of 20H2 available for use in commercial pre-release validation. It's a clear sign that Microsoft has finalised the features in its release build, with another being that recent Insider builds in both beta and release preview channels have only contained bug fixes. It can be downloaded from Windows Update, hosted in WSUS, or installed from ISO.

If you're planning a roll out, it's worth installing the previews now as part of your test and certification programme. Any tests should investigate 20H2's new IT pro tooling, which adds more classic Group Policy settings to Windows 10's MDM support, making it easier to manage devices with a lighter touch via Intune.

Building on several months of general availability of 2004, this is a stable and effective build, and should work well as an upgrade over 1909 or any 2004 systems you may have running. The new features make sense, and the user experience update with new icons and Start menu tiles give Windows 10 a much-anticipated refresh.

It's been 5 years and 10 updates since the debut of Windows 10, and this latest release looks to give enterprises a mix of new features and stability across all Windows platforms. With a major upgrade to WSL 2 in the current Dev channel, it looks like there's a lot more to come in 2021, so starting a roll out of 20H2 as soon as possible makes a lot of sense.

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Sours: https://www.techrepublic.com/article/windows-10-20h2-heres-why-youll-need-to-upgrade/
Besser nicht installieren 😕 Windows10 Update 20H2

Windows 10 version history

Version history of the Windows 10 operating system

Windows 10 is a series of operating systems developed by Microsoft. Microsoft described Windows 10 as an "operating system as a service" that would receive ongoing updates to its features and functionality, augmented with the ability for enterprise environments to receive non-critical updates at a slower pace or use long-term support milestones that will only receive critical updates, such as security patches, over their five-year lifespan of mainstream support. It was first released in July 2015.

Channels

Main article: Windows Insider § Channels

Windows 10 Insider Preview builds are delivered to Insiders in three different channels (previously "rings").[1] Insiders in the Dev Channel (previously Fast Ring) receive updates prior to those in the Beta Channel (previously Slow Ring), but might experience more bugs and other issues.[2][3] Insiders in the Release Preview Channel (previously Release Preview Ring) do not receive updates until the version is almost available to the public, but are comparatively more stable.[4]

PC version history

Mainstream builds of Windows 10 are labeled "YYMM", with YY representing the two-digit year and MM representing the month of planned release (for example, version 1507 refers to builds which initially released in July 2015). Starting with version 20H2, Windows 10 release nomenclature changed from the year and month pattern to a year and half-year pattern (YYH1, YYH2).[5]

Legend:   Old version, not maintained  Older version, still maintained  Current stable version  Latest preview version

Version 1507

Main article: Windows 10 version history (version 1507)

Version 1511 (November Update)

Main article: Windows 10 version 1511

The second stable build of Windows 10 is version 1511 (build number 10586), known as the November Update. It was codenamed "Threshold 2" (TH2) during development. This version was distributed via Windows Update on November 12, 2015. It contains various improvements to the operating system, its user interface, bundled services, as well as the introduction of Skype-based universal messaging apps, and the Windows Store for Business and Windows Update for Business features.[6][7][8][9]

On November 21, 2015, the November Update was temporarily pulled from public distribution.[10][11] The upgrade was re-instated on November 24, 2015, with Microsoft stating that the removal was due to a bug that caused privacy and data collection settings to be reset to defaults when installing the upgrade.[12]

Version 1607 (Anniversary Update)

Main article: Windows 10 version 1607

The third stable build of Windows 10 is called version 1607, known as the Anniversary Update. It was codenamed "Redstone 1" (RS1) during development. This version was released on August 2, 2016, a little over one year after the first stable release of Windows 10.[13][14][15][16] The Anniversary Update was originally thought to have been set aside for two feature updates. While both were originally to be released in 2016, the second was moved into 2017 so that it would be released in concert with that year's wave of Microsoft first-party devices.[17][18][14]

The Anniversary Update introduces new features such as the Windows Ink platform, which eases the ability to add stylus input support to Universal Windows Platform apps and provides a new "Ink Workspace" area with links to pen-oriented apps and features,[19][14] enhancements to Cortana's proactive functionality,[20] a dark user interface theme mode, a new version of Skype designed to work with the Universal Windows Platform, improvements to Universal Windows Platform intended for video games,[13] and offline scanning using Windows Defender.[21] The Anniversary Update also supports Windows Subsystem for Linux, a new component that provides an environment for running Linux-compatible binary software in an Ubuntu-based user mode environment.[22]

On new installations of Windows 10 on systems with Secure Boot enabled, all kernel-mode drivers issued after July 29, 2015 must be digitally signed with an Extended Validation Certificate issued by Microsoft.[23]

This version is the basis for "LTSB 2016", the first upgrade to the LTSB since Windows 10's release. The first LTSB release, based on RTM (version 1507), has been retroactively named "LTSB 2015".

Version 1703 (Creators Update)

Main article: Windows 10 version 1703

The fourth stable build of Windows 10 is called version 1703, known as the Creators Update. It was codenamed "Redstone 2" (RS2) during development. This version was announced on October 26, 2016,[24][25] and was released for general availability on April 11, 2017,[26][27] and for manual installation via Windows 10 Upgrade Assistant and Media Creation Tool tools on April 5, 2017.[28] This update primarily focuses on content creation, productivity, and gaming features—with a particular focus on virtual and augmented reality (including HoloLens and virtual reality headsets) and on aiding the generation of three-dimensional content.

It supports a new virtual reality workspace designed for use with headsets; Microsoft announced that several OEMs planned to release VR headsets designed for use with the Creators Update.[27][26][29]

Controls for the Game Bar and Game DVR feature have moved to the Settings app, while a new "Game Mode" option allows resources to be prioritized towards games.[30] Integration with Microsoft acquisition Mixer (formerly Beam)[31] was added for live streaming.[30] The themes manager moved to Settings app, and custom accent colors are now possible.[30] The new app Paint 3D allows users to produce artwork using 3D models; the app is designed to make 3D creation more accessible to mainstream users.[32]

Windows 10's privacy settings have more detailed explanations of data that the operating system may collect. Additionally, the "enhanced" level of telemetry collection was removed.[30] Windows Update notifications may now be "snoozed" for a period of time, the "active hours" during which Windows will not try to install updates may now extend up to 18 hours in length, and updates may be paused for up to seven days.[30] Windows Defender has been replaced by the universal app Windows Defender Security Center.[30] Devices may optionally be configured to prevent use of software from outside of Microsoft Store, or warn before installation of apps from outside of Microsoft Store.[33] "Dynamic Lock" allows a device to automatically lock if it is outside of the proximity of a designated Bluetooth device, such as a smartphone.[34] A "Night Light" feature was added, which allows the user to change the color temperature of the display to the red part of the spectrum at specific times of day (similarly to the third-party software f.lux).[35]

Version 1709 (Fall Creators Update)

Main article: Windows 10 version 1709

The fifth stable build of Windows 10 is called version 1709, known as the Fall Creators Update. It was codenamed "Redstone 3" (RS3) during development. This version was released on October 17, 2017.[36][37][38] Version 1709 introduces a new feature known as "My People", where shortcuts to "important" contacts can be displayed on the taskbar. Notifications involving these contacts appear above their respective pictures, and users can communicate with the contact via either Skype, e-mail, or text messaging (integrating with Android and Windows 10 Mobile devices). Support for additional services, including Xbox, Skype for Business, and third-party integration, are to be added in the future. Files can also be dragged directly to the contact's picture to share them.[39] My People was originally announced for Creators Update, but was ultimately held over to the next release,[40][41] and made its first public appearance in Build 16184 in late April 2017.[37] A new "Files-on-Demand" feature for OneDrive serves as a partial replacement for the previous "placeholders" function.[42]

It also introduces a new security feature known as "controlled folder access", which can restrict the applications allowed to access specific folders. This feature is designed mainly to defend against file-encrypting ransomware.[43]

Version 1803 (April 2018 Update)

Main article: Windows 10 version 1803

The sixth stable build of Windows 10 is called version 1803, known as the April 2018 Update. It was codenamed "Redstone 4" (RS4) during development. This version was released as a manual download on April 30, 2018, with a broad rollout on May 8, 2018.[44][45] This update was originally meant to be released on April 10, but was delayed because of a bug which could increase chances of a "Blue Screen of Death" (Stop error).[46]

The most significant feature of this build is Timeline, which is displayed within Task View. It allows users to view a list of recently-used documents and websites from supported applications ("activities"). When users consent to Microsoft data collection via Microsoft Graph, activities can also be synchronized from supported Android and iOS devices.[47][48][49][42]

Version 1809 (October 2018 Update)

Main article: Windows 10 version 1809

The seventh stable build of Windows 10 is called version 1809, known as the October 2018 Update. It was codenamed "Redstone 5" (RS5) during development. This version was released on October 2, 2018.[50] Highlighted features on this build include updates to the clipboard function (including support for clipboard history and syncing with other devices), SwiftKeyvirtual keyboard, Snip & Sketch, and File Explorer supporting the dark color scheme mode.[51]

On October 6, 2018, the build was pulled by Microsoft following isolated reports of the update process deleting files from user directories.[52] It was re-released to Windows Insider channel on October 9, with Microsoft citing a bug in OneDrive's Known Folder Redirection function as the culprit.[53][54]

On November 13, 2018, Microsoft resumed the rollout of 1809 for a small percentage of users.[55][56]

The long term servicing release, Windows 10 Enterprise 2019 LTSC, is based on this version and is equivalent in terms of features.[57]

Version 1903 (May 2019 Update)

Main article: Windows 10 version 1903

The eighth stable build of Windows 10, version 1903, codenamed "19H1", was released for general availability on May 21, 2019 after being on the Insider Release Preview branch since April 8, 2019.[58] Because of new practices introduced after the problems affecting the 1809 update, Microsoft used an intentionally slower Windows Update rollout process.[59][60][61]

New features in the update include a redesigned search tool—separated from Cortana and oriented towards textual queries, a new "Light" theme (set as default on Windows 10 Home) using a white-colored taskbar with dark icons, the addition of symbols and kaomoji to the emoji input menu, the ability to "pause" system updates, automated "Recommended troubleshooting", integration with Google Chrome on Timeline via an extension, support for SMS-based authentication on accounts linked to Microsoft accounts, and the ability to run Windows desktop applications within the Windows Mixed Reality environment (previously restricted to universal apps and SteamVR only). A new feature on Pro, Education, and Enterprise known as Windows Sandbox allows users to run applications within a secured Hyper-V environment.[62][63]

A revamped version of Game Bar was released alongside 1903, which redesigns it into a larger overlay with a performance display, Xbox friends list and social functionality, and audio and streaming settings.[64]

Version 1909 (November 2019 Update)

Main article: Windows 10 version 1909

The ninth stable build of Windows 10, version 1909, codenamed "19H2", was released to the public on November 12, 2019 after being on the Insider Release Preview branch since August 26, 2019.[65] Unlike previous updates, this one was released as a minor service update without major new features.[66]

Version 2004 (May 2020 Update)

Main article: Windows 10 version 2004

The tenth stable build of Windows 10, version 2004, codenamed "20H1", was released to the public on May 27, 2020 after being on the Insider Release Preview branch since April 16, 2020.[67] New features included faster and easier access to Bluetooth settings and pairing, improved Kaomojis, renamable virtual desktops, DirectX12 Ultimate, a chat-based UI for Cortana, greater integration with Android phones on the Your Phone app, Windows Subsystem for Linux 2 (WSL 2), and WSL 2 version includes a custom Linux kernel, unlike older WSL, the ability to use Windows Hello without the need for a password, improved Windows Search with integration with File Explorer, a cloud download option to reset Windows, accessibility improvements, and the ability to view disk drive type and discrete graphics card temperatures in Task Manager.[68][69]

Version 20H2 (October 2020 Update)

Main article: Windows 10 version 20H2

The eleventh stable build of Windows 10, version 20H2, was released to the public on October 20, 2020 after being on the Beta Channel since June 16, 2020.[70] New features include new theme-aware tiles in the Start Menu, new features and improvements to Microsoft Edge (such as a price comparison tool, + integration for tab switching, and easy access to pinned tabs), a new out-of-box experience with more personalization for the taskbar, notifications improvements, improvements to tablet mode, improvements to Modern Device Management, and the move of the System tab in Control Panel to the About page in Settings. This is the first version of Windows 10 to include the new Chromium-based Edge browser by default.[71][72][73]

Version 21H1 (May 2021 Update)

The Windows 10 May 2021 Update[74] (codenamed "21H1"[75]) is the eleventh and current major update to Windows 10 as the cumulative update to the October 2020 Update, and carries the build number 10.0.19043. The first preview was released to Insiders who opted in to Beta Channel on February 17, 2021.[76] The update began rolling out on May 18, 2021.[77] Notable changes in the May 2021 Update include:[78]

Preview builds of Windows 10 version 21H1
Version Knowledge base Release date(s) Highlights
10.0.19043.844
[76]
KB4601382 Beta Channel:
February 17, 2021
10.0.19043.867
[79]
KB5000802 Beta Channel:
March 9, 2021
10.0.19043.899
[80]
KB5000842 Beta Channel:
March 15, 2021
  • Replaced EdgeHTML-based Microsoft Edge Legacy with Chromium-based Microsoft Edge
10.0.19043.906
[81]
Beta Channel:
March 25, 2021
10.0.19043.928
[82]
KB5001330 Beta Channel and Release Preview Channel:
April 13, 2021
10.0.19043.962
[83]
KB5001391 Beta Channel and Release Preview Channel:
April 19, 2021
  • New "News and Interests" feature on the taskbar
10.0.19043.964
[84]
Beta Channel and Release Preview Channel:
April 28, 2021
Version Knowledge base Release date(s) Highlights
Public patches of Windows 10 version 21H1
Version Knowledge base Release date(s) Highlights
10.0.19043.985
Version 21H1
[85][86]
KB5003173 Beta Channel and Release Preview Channel:
May 11, 2021

Public release:
May 18, 2021

10.0.19043.1023
[87][88]
KB5003214 Beta Channel and Release Preview Channel:
May 21, 2021

Public release:
May 25, 2021

10.0.19043.1052
[89][90]
KB5003637 Beta Channel, Release Preview Channel and public release:
June 8, 2021
10.0.19043.1055
[91]
KB5004476 Beta Channel, Release Preview Channel and public release:
June 11, 2021
10.0.19043.1081
[92][93]
KB5003690 Beta Channel and Release Preview Channel:
June 17, 2021

Public release:
June 21, 2021

10.0.19043.1082
[94]
KB5004760 Beta Channel, Release Preview Channel and public release:
June 29, 2021
10.0.19043.1083
[95]
KB5004945 Beta Channel, Release Preview Channel and public release:
July 6, 2021
10.0.19043.1110
[96]
KB5004237 Beta Channel, Release Preview Channel and public release:
July 13, 2021
10.0.19043.1147
[97]
KB5004296 Release Preview Channel:
July 15, 2021
10.0.19043.1149
[98]
Release Preview Channel:
July 20, 2021
10.0.19043.1151
[99]
Release Preview Channel and public release:
July 29, 2021
10.0.19043.1165
[100]
KB5005033 Release Preview Channel and public release:
August 10, 2021
10.0.19043.1200
[101]
KB5005101 Release Preview Channel:
August 18, 2021
10.0.19043.1202
[102][103]
Release Preview Channel:
August 31, 2021

Public release:
September 1, 2021

10.0.19043.1237
[104]
KB5005565 Release Preview Channel and public release:
September 14, 2021
10.0.19043.1263
[105]
KB5005611 Release Preview Channel:
September 23, 2021
10.0.19043.1266
[106]
Release Preview Channel and public release:
September 30, 2021
10.0.19043.1288
[107]
KB5006670 Release Preview Channel and public release:
October 12, 2021
Version Knowledge base Release date(s) Highlights

Version 21H2

The twelfth major update to Windows 10 (codenamed "21H2"[108]) is the cumulative update to the May 2021 Update, and carries the build number 10.0.19044. The first preview was released on July 15, 2021 to Insiders who opted in to Release Preview Channel that failed to meet minimum system requirements for Windows 11.[109]

Preview builds of Windows 10 version 21H2
Version Knowledge base Release date(s) Highlights
10.0.19044.1147
[109]
KB5004296 Release Preview Channel:
July 15, 2021
10.0.19044.1149
[110]
Release Preview Channel:
July 20, 2021
10.0.19044.1151
[99]
Release Preview Channel:
July 29, 2021
10.0.19044.1165
[100]
KB5005033 Release Preview Channel:
August 10, 2021
10.0.19044.1200
[111]
KB5005101 Release Preview Channel:
August 18, 2021
  • Added support for WPA3 Hash-to-Element (H2E) standards
  • New simplified passwordless deployment models for Windows Hello for Business
  • Added GPU compute support in the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) and Azure IoT Edge for Linux on Windows (EFLOW) deployments
10.0.19044.1202
[112]
Release Preview Channel:
August 31, 2021
10.0.19044.1237
[104]
KB5005565 Release Preview Channel:
September 14, 2021
10.0.19044.1263
[113]
KB5005611 Release Preview Channel:
September 23, 2021
10.0.19044.1266
[106]
Release Preview Channel:
September 30, 2021
10.0.19044.1288
[107]
KB5006670 Release Preview Channel:
October 12, 2021

Fast Ring / Dev Channel

Legend:   Expired preview version  Old preview version, still maintained

Fast Ring

On December 16, 2019, Microsoft announced that Windows Insiders in the Fast Ring will receive builds directly from the RS_PRERELEASE branch, which are not matched to a specific Windows 10 release. The first build released under the new strategy, build 19536, was made available to Insiders on the same day.[114]

The MN_RELEASE branch was available from May 13, 2020 to June 17, 2020.[115][116] The branch was mandatory for all Windows Insiders.[116]

Preview builds of Windows 10 in the Fast Ring
Version Release date(s) Expiration date Highlights
10.0.19536.1000
[114]
Fast ring:
December 16, 2019
Expiration date:
July 31, 2020
  • Added optional drivers support in Windows Update
  • Re-introduced new Korean IME
  • New family group setup
10.0.19541.1000
[117]
Fast ring:
January 8, 2020
  • New location in-use icon in notification area
  • Added ability to view computer architecture in Details tab in Task Manager
10.0.19546.1000
[118]
Fast ring:
January 16, 2020
10.0.19551.1005
[119]
Fast ring:
January 23, 2020
10.0.19555.1001
[120]
Fast ring:
January 30, 2020
10.0.19559.1000
[122]
Fast ring:
February 5, 2020
10.0.19564.1000
[123]
Fast ring:
February 12, 2020
  • Updated graphics settings page in Settings app
10.0.19564.1005
[123]
10.0.19569.1000
[124]
Fast ring:
February 20, 2020
10.0.19577.1000
[125]
Fast ring:
March 5, 2020
  • New policy for diagnostic data in Settings app
  • Redesigned icon for Windows Security
  • Improvements to Cortana, advanced startup in Settings app and Start
10.0.19582.1000
[126]
Fast ring:
March 12, 2020
  • Updated Eye Control settings in Settings app
10.0.19587.1000
[127]
Fast ring:
March 18, 2020
10.0.19592.1000
[128]
Fast ring:
March 25, 2020
10.0.19603.1000
[129]
Fast ring:
April 8, 2020
  • Integrated File Explorer in Windows Subsystem for Linux
  • New cleanup recommendations feature in Storage Settings
10.0.19608.1000
[130]
Fast ring:
April 15, 2020
  • New default apps experience in Settings app
10.0.19608.1006
[130]
Fast ring:
April 17, 2020
10.0.19613.1000
[131]
Fast ring:
April 22, 2020
10.0.19613.1005
[131]
Fast ring:
April 27, 2020
10.0.19619.1000
[132]
Fast ring:
April 29, 2020
10.0.19624.1000
[133]
Fast ring:
May 6, 2020
  • Disabled new default apps search box in Settings app for maintenance
  • Updated VPN connection and Optional Updates experiences
10.0.19628.1
[134]
Fast ring:
May 13, 2020
  • Added initial support for DNS over HTTPS
  • Reverted new Korean IME for maintenance
10.0.19631.1
[135]
Fast ring:
May 21, 2020
10.0.19635.1
[136]
Fast ring:
May 28, 2020
10.0.19640.1
[137]
Fast ring:
June 3, 2020
10.0.19645.1
[138]
Fast ring:
June 10, 2020
Version Release date(s) Expiration date Highlights

Dev Channel

As of June 15, 2020, Microsoft has introduced the "channels" model to its Windows Insider Program, succeeding its "ring" model.[139] All future builds starting from build 10.0.20150, therefore, would be released to Windows Insiders in the Dev Channel.[115]

The FE_RELEASE branch was available from October 29, 2020 to January 6, 2021.[140][141] The branch was mandatory for all Windows Insiders until December 10. Afterward, Windows Insiders could choose to move back to the RS_PRERELEASE branch.[142]

The CO_RELEASE branch was available from April 5 to June 14, 2021.[143] The branch was mandatory for all Windows Insiders.

As of June 28, 2021, the Dev Channel has transitioned to Windows 11.[144]

Preview builds of Windows 10 in the Dev Channel
Version Release date(s) Expiration date(s) Highlights
10.0.20150.1000
[115]
Dev Channel:
June 17, 2020
Expiration date:
July 31, 2020
  • Improvements to Windows Subsystem for Linux[121]
    • Added GPU compute support
    • New and commands
  • Re-introduced new Korean IME
10.0.20152.1000
[145]
Dev Channel:
June 24, 2020
10.0.20161.1000
[146]
Dev Channel:
July 1, 2020
  • New theme-aware tiles in Start Menu
  • Improvements to Microsoft Edge (Switch between multiple tabs and Windows apps by pressing +)
  • New personalized and out-of-box experience for taskbar
  • Improvements to notification experience as well as tablet experience for 2-in-1 devices
  • Migrated information in Control Panel's System page into the Settings About page in Settings app
10.0.20170.1000
[147]
Dev Channel:
July 15, 2020
Expiration date:
January 31, 2021
  • Updates to the Setting app
    • Updated sound settings
    • New Settings app icon
  • New experimental implementation of TLS 1.3 (enabled by default)
10.0.20175.1000
[148]
Dev Channel:
July 22, 2020
  • Improvements to Microsoft Edge (Quick access to active tabs for pinned sites in the taskbar)
  • New command in PowerShell
  • New Eye Contact feature for Surface Pro X
  • Improvements to Windows Subsystem for Linux[121]
10.0.20180.1000
[149]
Dev Channel:
July 29, 2020
10.0.20185.1000
[150]
Dev Channel:
August 5, 2020
  • Updates to the Settings app
    • DNS settings is now a top-level option
    • New encrypted DNS configuration settings
  • New ADMX-based policies for MDM
10.0.20190.1000
[151]
Dev Channel:
August 12, 2020
  • New post-update experience
  • Updates to Graphics Settings in the Settings app
  • Improvements to Japanese IME (Switch between Hiragana and Katakana by using + and + respectively)
  • Improvements to Windows Subsystem for Linux[121]
10.0.20197.1000
[152]
Dev Channel:
August 21, 2020
  • New Disk Management page in the Settings app
  • Removal of new post-update experience for maintenance
10.0.20201.1000
[153]
Dev Channel:
August 26, 2020
10.0.20206.1000
[154]
Dev Channel:
September 2, 2020
  • Improvements to emoji panel
    • Revamped UI with acrylic element
    • New inline emoji search box
    • Added support for animated GIF
    • Integrated clipboard history into input experiences
  • New Windows voice typing feature (Improved version of dictation in WSR)
  • Redesigned touch keyboard
  • Added cursor movement support via gestures on the touch keyboard
10.0.20211.1000
[155]
Dev Channel:
September 10, 2020
  • Added search box to the Default Apps pages in Settings app
  • Improvements to Windows Subsystem for Linux[121]
    • New command for accessing Linux file systems mounted from physical or virtual disks in WSL 2[156]
10.0.20211.1005
[155]
Dev Channel:
September 11, 2020
The rollout of this build has been pulled due to issues related to the installing process.
10.0.20215.1000
[157]
Dev Channel:
September 16, 2020
  • Introduced dark theme for Windows 10 search experience on the taskbar
10.0.20221.1000
[158]
Dev Channel:
September 23, 2020
  • New Meet Now feature in Skype
10.0.20226.1000
[159]
Dev Channel:
September 30, 2020
  • New storage health monitoring feature
  • Improvements to Windows Subsystem for Linux[121]
10.0.20231.1000
[160]
Dev Channel:
October 7, 2020
  • New "Customize your device" page in Windows OOBE setup
  • Added ability to modify file associations on a per-user or per-device basis for enterprise users
10.0.20231.1005
[160]
Dev Channel:
October 13, 2020
10.0.20236.1000
[161]
Dev Channel:
October 14, 2020
  • New refresh rate setting in the Settings app
10.0.20236.1005
[161]
Dev Channel:
October 16, 2020
10.0.20241.1000
[162]
Dev Channel:
October 21, 2020
  • New theme-aware splash screens for UWP apps
  • Improvements to Optimize Drives page in the Settings app
10.0.20241.1005
[162]
Dev Channel:
October 23, 2020
10.0.20246.1
[140]
Dev Channel:
October 29, 2020
  • Removal of updated emoji picker, redesigned touch keyboard, voice typing, theme-aware splash screens, and other features for maintenance
10.0.20251.1
[163]
Dev Channel:
November 4, 2020
10.0.20257.1
[164]
Dev Channel:
November 11, 2020
10.0.20262.1
[165]
Dev Channel:
November 18, 2020
10.0.20262.1010
[165]
Dev Channel:
November 20, 2020
10.0.20270.1
[166]
Dev Channel:
December 3, 2020
Expiration date:
October 31, 2021
10.0.20277.1
[142]
Dev Channel:
December 10, 2020
10.0.21277.1000
[167]
  • Re-introduced updated emoji picker, redesigned touch keyboard, voice typing, theme-aware splash screens, and other features
  • New x64 emulation for Windows 10 on ARM
  • Added support for Emoji 12.1 and 13.0
10.0.20279.1
[168]
Dev Channel:
December 14, 2020
10.0.21286.1000
[141]
Dev Channel:
January 6, 2021
  • New "News and Interests" feature on the taskbar
  • New "Manage Storage Spaces" setting in the Settings app
  • New command-line tool
  • Improvements to Windows Subsystem for Linux[121]
  • Improvements to experience when transitioning between timezones
10.0.21292.1000
[169]
Dev Channel:
January 13, 2021
  • Improvements to News and Interests
10.0.21292.1010
[169]
Dev Channel:
January 15, 2021
10.0.21296.1000
[170]
Dev Channel:
January 21, 2021
10.0.21296.1010
[170]
Dev Channel:
January 25, 2021
10.0.21301.1000
[171]
Dev Channel:
January 27, 2021
  • Improvements to the touch keyboard design
10.0.21301.1010
[171]
Dev Channel:
February 1, 2021
10.0.21313.1000
[172]
Dev Channel:
February 12, 2021
  • Expanded News and Interests feature on the taskbar to more languages
  • Replaced EdgeHTML-based Microsoft Edge Legacy with Chromium-based Microsoft Edge
  • New IME candidate window design
10.0.21318.1000
[173]
Dev Channel:
February 19, 2021
  • New "paste as plain text" option in clipboard history
10.0.21322.1000
[174]
Dev Channel:
February 24, 2021
  • Partial removal of improved touch keyboard design for maintenance
10.0.21327.1000
[175]
Dev Channel:
March 3, 2021
  • New design for News and Interests
10.0.21327.1010
[175]
Dev Channel:
March 8, 2021
10.0.21332.1000
[176]
Dev Channel:
March 10, 2021
  • Updates to News and Interests
  • Re-introduced theme-aware splash screens
  • Removal of 3D Viewer and Paint 3D as pre-installed applications on clean installs
  • Removal of Math Input Panel due to low usage
10.0.21332.1010
[176]
Dev Channel:
March 15, 2021
10.0.21337.1000
[177]
Dev Channel:
March 17, 2021
  • New reorder and background settings for Virtual Desktop in Task View
  • New Auto HDR feature
  • Updates to File Explorer
    • Updated the default layout with additional padding between elements
    • New compact mode setting for restoring the classic layout
  • Updates to captions settings in the Settings app
  • Updates to inbox apps
  • Expanded new IME candidate window design to more languages
10.0.21337.1010
[177]
Dev Channel:
March 19, 2021
10.0.21343.1000
[178]
Dev Channel:
March 24, 2021
10.0.21354.1
[143]
Dev Channel:
April 7, 2021
  • New personalization options for News and Interests
  • Improvements to display settings in the Settings app
    • Added option for disabling Content Adaptive Brightness Control (CABC)
    • Added HDR certification
  • New camera settings page in the Settings app
  • Updates to inbox apps
    • Microsoft Paint and Snipping Tool now updated via the Microsoft Store
    • Integrated Windows Accessories, Windows Administrative Tools, Windows PowerShell and Windows System folders into Windows Tools
  • Improvements to Windows Subsystem for Linux[121]
10.0.21359.1
[179]
Dev Channel:
April 14, 2021
  • Reverted new Korean IME for maintenance
10.0.21364.1
[180]
Dev Channel:
April 21, 2021
  • Improvements to Windows Subsystem for Linux[121]
    • Added initial GUI app support
  • Updates to Task Manager
    • Added process classification support for Microsoft Edge
    • New Eco mode
  • New Japanese gojūon touch keyboard
10.0.21364.1000
[180]
Dev Channel:
April 24, 2021
10.0.21364.1011
[180]
Dev Channel:
April 28, 2021
10.0.21370.1
[181]
Dev Channel:
April 29, 2021
  • Improvements to the Bluetooth audio experience
    • Unified audio endpoint in audio input selection menu
    • Added support for AAC codec
10.0.21376.1
[182]
Dev Channel:
May 6, 2021
10.0.21382.1
[183]
Dev Channel:
May 14, 2021
  • Added HDR support for applications that use ICC profiles
  • Added ability to view drivers alongside of devices in Device Manager
10.0.21382.1000
[183]
Dev Channel:
May 18, 2021
10.0.21387.1
[184]
Dev Channel:
May 21, 2021
  • Removal of Eco mode in Task Manager for maintenance
10.0.21390.1
[185]
Dev Channel:
May 26, 2021
  • New icons for Task Manager and MSI installers
10.0.21390.1000
[185]
Dev Channel:
June 7, 2021
10.0.21390.1010
[185]
Dev Channel:
June 10, 2021
10.0.21390.2025
[185]
Dev Channel:
June 14, 2021
Transitioned to Windows 11; see Windows 11 version history
Version Release date(s) Expiration date(s) Highlights

Mobile version history

Main article: Windows 10 Mobile version history

See also

References

  1. ^Aul, Gabe (October 21, 2014). "We're rolling out our first new build to the Windows Insider Program". Windows Blogs.
  2. ^Hassan, Mehedi (February 19, 2015). "[WP10] Microsoft releases Slow ring for Windows 10 for Phones Technical Preview". Windows Mobile PowerUser.
  3. ^Hassan, Mehedi (February 19, 2015). "Video Recorder on Windows 10 for Phones Preview introduces couple of new features". Windows Mobile PowerUser.
  4. ^Rubino, Daniel (May 6, 2016). "Which Windows Insider Ring is best? All you need to know about Slow, Fast, and Release Preview rings". Windows Central.
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  12. ^"Windows 10 November update was pulled for forgetting privacy settings; it's now back". Ars Technica. Conde Nast. Retrieved November 25, 2015.
  13. ^ abBright, Peter (June 29, 2016). "Windows 10 Anniversary Update coming August 2 for 350 million Windows 10 users". Ars Technica. Conde Nast Digital. Retrieved June 30, 2016.
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  17. ^Cooper, Daniel (April 8, 2015). "Next year's big Windows 10 update is codenamed 'Redstone'". Engadget. AOL. Retrieved April 8, 2015.
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  33. ^Tung, Liam. "Windows 10 to permit block on apps installing if they're not from Microsoft Store". ZDNet. Retrieved March 8, 2018.
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  36. ^"Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 16288 Readies For Fall Creators Update". Tom's Hardware. September 13, 2017. Retrieved September 14, 2017.
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  39. ^"Windows 10 gets more social with "My People," a taskbar feature focused on sharing, communication". TechCrunch. AOL. Retrieved October 26, 2016.
  40. ^"Announcing Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 15007 for PC and Mobile". Windows blog. Microsoft. January 12, 2017. Retrieved March 17, 2017.
  41. ^"Windows 10's next big update, Redstone 3, hits the radar". InfoWorld. February 23, 2017. Retrieved March 17, 2017.
  42. ^ ab"Microsoft announces Windows 10 Fall Creators Update". The Verge. Vox Media. May 11, 2017. Retrieved May 11, 2017.
  43. ^Warren, Tom (June 29, 2017). "Windows 10 will hide your important files from ransomware soon". The Verge. Retrieved June 29, 2017.
  44. ^"Make the most of your time with the new Windows 10 update - Windows Experience BlogWindows Experience Blog". blogs.windows.com. April 27, 2018. Retrieved May 6, 2018.
  45. ^"How to get the Windows 10 April 2018 Update - Windows Experience BlogWindows Experience Blog". blogs.windows.com. April 30, 2018. Retrieved May 6, 2018.
  46. ^"Microsoft reveals why the Spring Creators Update has been delayed". TechRadar. Retrieved May 6, 2018.
  47. ^"Windows 10 Timeline: How to use Microsoft's new organizational tool". PCWorld. Retrieved October 6, 2018.
  48. ^"Microsoft's next mobile strategy is to make iOS and Android better". The Verge. May 11, 2017. Retrieved May 12, 2017.
  49. ^"Microsoft Graph bridges the gap between Windows and your phone". Engadget. Retrieved May 12, 2017.
  50. ^"Windows 10 October 2018 Update is available today". The Verge. Retrieved October 2, 2018.
  51. ^"Windows 10 October 2018 Update: The 7 best new features". CNET. October 3, 2018. Retrieved October 6, 2018.
  52. ^Cimpanu, Catalin. "Microsoft pulls Windows 10 October Update (version 1809)". ZDNet. Retrieved October 6, 2018.
  53. ^"Microsoft begins re-releasing Windows 10 October update after fixing file deletion bug". The Verge. Retrieved October 9, 2018.
  54. ^"Windows 10 October 2018 Update rereleased to Insiders, data loss blamed on misdirected folders". PCWorld. Retrieved November 14, 2018.
  55. ^"Microsoft re-releases Windows 10 October 2018 Update today after pulling it offline". The Verge. Retrieved November 14, 2018.
  56. ^Bott, Ed. "Microsoft resumes rollout of Windows 10 version 1809, promises quality changes". ZDNet. Retrieved November 13, 2018.
  57. ^"What's new in Windows 10 Enterprise 2019 LTSC". Microsoft. Retrieved February 19, 2020.
  58. ^"Windows 10, version 1903 and Windows Server, version 1903". Microsoft Docs. May 21, 2019. Retrieved July 16, 2019.
  59. ^Warren, Tom (May 21, 2019). "Microsoft's next major Windows 10 update is now available". The Verge. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  60. ^Warren, Tom (April 8, 2019). "Microsoft releases final Windows 10 May 2019 Update to testers". The Verge. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  61. ^Bright, Peter (May 21, 2019). "Windows 10 May 2019 Update now rolling out to everyone... slowly". Ars Technica. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  62. ^"Windows 10 May 2019 Update review: Sandbox and a better Windows Update improve your PC". PCWorld. May 21, 2019. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  63. ^Warren, Tom (May 22, 2019). "Windows 10 May 2019 Update: the 10 best new features". The Verge. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  64. ^Warren, Tom (May 22, 2019). "Microsoft's new Xbox Game Bar launches for Windows 10 as a useful overlay with widgets". The Verge. Retrieved November 6, 2019.
  65. ^"Windows 10, version 1909 and Windows Server, version 1909". Microsoft Docs. November 12, 2019. Retrieved January 14, 2020.
  66. ^"Getting the November 2019 Update Ready for Release". Windows Experience Blog. October 11, 2019. Retrieved February 5, 2020.
  67. ^"Windows 10, version 2004 and Windows Server, version 2004". Microsoft Docs. May 2020. Retrieved June 15, 2020.
  68. ^"What's New in the Windows 10 May 2020 Update". Windows Blog. May 27, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  69. ^"Windows 10 May 2020 Update release date, news and features". May 27, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  70. ^"Windows 10, version 20H2 and Windows Server, version 20H2". Microsoft Docs. October 2020. Retrieved December 31, 2020.
  71. ^Woodman, Aaron (October 20, 2020). "What's new in the Windows 10 October 2020 Update". Windows Experience Blog. Retrieved October 21, 2020.
  72. ^Warren, Tom (October 20, 2020). "Windows 10 October 2020 Update is now available with an updated Start menu and more". The Verge. Retrieved October 21, 2020.
  73. ^"Microsoft Edge Will Now Offer Inbuilt Price Comparison, Screenshot and Video Calling Tools". MSN. September 10, 2020. Retrieved October 21, 2020.
  74. ^"Preparing the Windows 10 May 2021 Update for Release". Windows Experience Blog. April 28, 2021. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  75. ^Cable, John (February 17, 2021). "Introducing the next feature update to Windows 10, version 21H1". Windows Insider Blog.
  76. ^ ab"Announcing Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 19043.844 (21H1)". Windows Insider Blog. February 17, 2021.
  77. ^"How to get the Windows 10 May 2021 Update". Windows Experience Blog. May 18, 2021. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  78. ^"What's new in Windows 10, version 21H1 for IT Pros". Microsoft. May 18, 2020. Retrieved May 19, 2020.
  79. ^"Releasing Windows 10 Build 19043.867 (21H1) to Beta Channel". Windows Insider Blog. March 10, 2021.
  80. ^"Releasing Windows 10 Build 19043.899 (21H1) to Beta Channel". Windows Insider Blog. March 16, 2021.
  81. ^"Releasing Windows 10 Build 19043.906 (21H1) to Beta Channel". Windows Insider Blog. March 25, 2021.
  82. ^"Releasing Windows 10 Build 19043.928 (21H1) to Beta & Release Preview Channels". Windows Insider Blog. April 14, 2021.
  83. ^"Releasing Windows 10 Build 19043.962 (21H1) to Beta Channel & Release Preview Channels". Windows Insider Blog. Microsoft. April 19, 2021. Retrieved April 20, 2021.
  84. ^"Releasing Windows 10 Build 19043.964 (21H1) to Beta & Release Preview Channels". Windows Insider Blog. Microsoft. April 28, 2021. Retrieved April 29, 2021.
  85. ^"Releasing Windows 10 Build 19043.985 (21H1) to Beta & Release Preview Channels". Windows Insider Blog. Microsoft
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_10_version_history

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Windows 10, version 21H1 update history

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Windows 10, version 2004 and Windows Server, version 2004 update history

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  • November 19, 2020—KB4594440 (OS Builds 19041.631 and 19042.631) Out-of-band
  • November 10, 2020—KB4586781 (OS Builds 19041.630 and 19042.630)
  • October 29, 2020—KB4580364 (OS Builds 19041.610 and 19042.610) Preview
  • October 13, 2020—KB4579311 (OS Build 19041.572)
  • October 1, 2020—KB4577063 (OS Build 19041.546) Preview
  • September 8, 2020—KB4571756 (OS Build 19041.508)
  • September 3, 2020—KB4571744 (OS Build 19041.488) Preview
  • August 11, 2020—KB4566782 (OS Build 19041.450)
  • July 31, 2020—KB4568831 (OS Build 19041.423)
  • July 14, 2020—KB4565503 (OS Build 19041.388)
  • June 18, 2020—KB4567523 (OS Build 19041.331)
  • June 9, 2020—KB4557957 (OS Build 19041.329)

Windows 10, version 1909 and Windows Server, version 1909 update history

  • Windows 10, version 1909 and Windows Server, version 1909 update history
  • October 12, 2021—KB5006667 (OS Build 18363.1854)
  • September 21, 2021—KB5005624 (OS Build 18363.1830) Preview
  • September 14, 2021—KB5005566 (OS Build 18363.1801)
  • August 26, 2021—KB5005103 (OS Build 18363.1766) Preview
  • August 10, 2021—KB5005031 (OS Build 18363.1734)
  • July 29, 2021—KB5004293 (OS Build 18363.1714) Preview
  • July 13, 2021—KB5004245 (OS Build 18363.1679)
  • July 6, 2021—KB5004946 (OS Build 18363.1646) Out-of-band
  • June 15, 2021—KB5003698 (OS Build 18363.1645) Preview
  • June 8, 2021—KB5003635 (OS Build 18363.1621)
  • May 20, 2021—KB5003212 (OS Build 18363.1593) Preview
  • May 11, 2021—KB5003169 (OS Build 18363.1556)
  • April 22, 2021—KB5001396 (OS Build 18363.1533) Preview
  • April 13, 2021—KB5001337 (OS Build 18363.1500)
  • March 25, 2021—KB5000850 (OS Build 18363.1474) Preview
  • March 18, 2021—KB5001648 (OS Build 18363.1443) Out-of-band
  • March 15, 2021—KB5001566 (OS Build 18363.1441) Out-of-band
  • March 9, 2021—KB5000808 (OS Build 18363.1440)
  • February 16, 2021—KB4601380 (OS Build 18363.1411) Preview
  • February 11, 2021—KB5001028 (OS Build 18363.1379) Out-of-band
  • February 9, 2021—KB4601315 (OS Build 18363.1377)
  • January 21, 2021—KB4598298 (OS Build 18363.1350) Preview
  • January 12, 2021—KB4598229 (OS Build 18363.1316)
  • December 8, 2020—KB4592449 (OS Builds 18362.1256 and 18363.1256)
  • November 19, 2020—KB4594443 (OS Builds 18362.1199 and 18363.1199) Out-of-band
  • November 19, 2020—KB4586819 (OS Builds 18362.1237 and 18363.1237) Preview
  • November 10, 2020—KB4586786 (OS Builds 18362.1198 and 18363.1198)
  • October 20, 2020—KB4580386 (OS Builds 18362.1171 and 18363.1171) Preview
  • October 13, 2020—KB4577671 (OS Builds 18362.1139 and 18363.1139)
  • September 16, 2020—KB4577062 (OS Builds 18362.1110 and 18363.1110) Preview
  • September 8, 2020—KB4574727 (OS Builds 18362.1082 and 18363.1082)
  • August 20, 2020—KB4566116 (OS Builds 18362.1049 and 18363.1049) Preview
  • August 11, 2020—KB4565351 (OS Builds 18362.1016 and 18363.1016)
  • July 21, 2020—KB4559004 (OS Builds 18362.997 and 18363.997)
  • July 14, 2020—KB4565483 (OS Builds 18362.959 and 18363.959)
  • June 16, 2020—KB4567512 (OS Builds 18362.904 and 18363.904)
  • June 9, 2020—KB4560960 (OS Builds 18362.900 and 18363.900)
  • May 12, 2020—KB4556799 (OS Builds 18362.836 and 18363.836)
  • April 21, 2020—KB4550945 (OS Builds 18362.815 and 18363.815)
  • April 14, 2020—KB4549951 (OS Builds 18362.778 and 18363.778)
  • March 30, 2020—KB4554364 (OS Builds 18362.753 and 18363.753)
  • March 24, 2020—KB4541335 (OS Builds 18362.752 and 18363.752)
  • March 12, 2020—KB4551762 (OS Builds 18362.720 and 18363.720)
  • March 10, 2020—KB4540673 (OS Builds 18362.719 and 18363.719)
  • February 27, 2020—KB4535996 (OS Builds 18362.693 and 18363.693)
  • February 11, 2020—KB4532693 (OS Builds 18362.657 and 18363.657)
  • January 28, 2020—KB4532695 (OS Builds 18362.628 and 18363.628)
  • January 14, 2020—KB4528760 (OS Builds 18362.592 and 18363.592)
  • December 10, 2019—KB4530684 (OS Builds 18362.535 and 18363.535)
  • November 12, 2019—KB4524570 (OS Builds 18362.476 and 18363.476)

Windows 10, version 1903 and Windows Server, version 1903 update history

  • Windows 10, version 1903 and Windows Server, version 1903 update history
  • End of service statement
  • December 8, 2020—KB4592449 (OS Builds 18362.1256 and 18363.1256)
  • November 19, 2020—KB4594443 (OS Builds 18362.1199 and 18363.1199) Out-of-band
  • November 19, 2020—KB4586819 (OS Builds 18362.1237 and 18363.1237) Preview
  • November 10, 2020—KB4586786 (OS Builds 18362.1198 and 18363.1198)
  • October 20, 2020—KB4580386 (OS Builds 18362.1171 and 18363.1171) Preview
  • October 13, 2020—KB4577671 (OS Builds 18362.1139 and 18363.1139)
  • September 16, 2020—KB4577062 (OS Builds 18362.1110 and 18363.1110) Preview
  • September 8, 2020—KB4574727 (OS Builds 18362.1082 and 18363.1082)
  • August 20, 2020—KB4566116 (OS Builds 18362.1049 and 18363.1049) Preview
  • August 11, 2020—KB4565351 (OS Builds 18362.1016 and 18363.1016)
  • July 21, 2020—KB4559004 (OS Builds 18362.997 and 18363.997)
  • July 14, 2020—KB4565483 (OS Builds 18362.959 and 18363.959)
  • June 16, 2020—KB4567512 (OS Builds 18362.904 and 18363.904)
  • June 9, 2020—KB4560960 (OS Builds 18362.900 and 18363.900)
  • May 12, 2020—KB4556799 (OS Builds 18362.836 and 18363.836)
  • April 21, 2020—KB4550945 (OS Builds 18362.815 and 18363.815)
  • April 14, 2020—KB4549951 (OS Builds 18362.778 and 18363.778)
  • March 30, 2020—KB4554364 (OS Builds 18362.753 and 18363.753)
  • March 24, 2020—KB4541335 (OS Builds 18362.752 and 18363.752)
  • March 12, 2020—KB4551762 (OS Builds 18362.720 and 18363.720)
  • March 10, 2020—KB4540673 (OS Builds 18362.719 and 18363.719)
  • February 27, 2020—KB4535996 (OS Builds 18362.693 and 18363.693)
  • February 11, 2020—KB4532693 (OS Builds 18362.657 and 18363.657)
  • January 28, 2020—KB4532695 (OS Builds 18362.628 and 18363.628)
  • January 14, 2020—KB4528760 (OS Builds 18362.592 and 18363.592)
  • December 10, 2019—KB4530684 (OS Builds 18362.535 and 18363.535)
  • November 12, 2019—KB4524570 (OS Builds 18362.476 and 18363.476)
  • October 24, 2019—KB4522355 (OS Build 18362.449)
  • October 8, 2019—KB4517389 (OS Build 18362.418)
  • October 3, 2019—KB4524147 (OS Build 18362.388)
  • September 26, 2019—KB4517211 (OS Build 18362.387)
  • September 23, 2019—KB4522016 (OS Build 18362.357)
  • September 10, 2019—KB4515384 (OS Build 18362.356)
  • August 30, 2019—KB4512941 (OS Build 18362.329)
  • August 13, 2019—KB4512508 (OS Build 18362.295)
  • July 26, 2019—KB4505903 (OS Build 18362.267)
  • July 9, 2019—KB4507453 (OS Build 18362.239)
  • June 27, 2019—KB4501375 (OS Build 18362.207)
  • June 11, 2019—KB4503293 (OS Build 18362.175)
  • May 29, 2019—KB4497935 (OS Build 18362.145)

Windows 10, version 1809, Windows Server, version 1809, and Windows Server 2019 update history

  • Windows 10, version 1809, Windows Server, version 1809, and Windows Server 2019 update history
  • October 12, 2021—KB5006672 (OS Build 17763.2237)
  • September 21, 2021—KB5005625 (OS Build 17763.2210) Preview
  • September 14, 2021—KB5005568 (OS Build 17763.2183)
  • August 26, 2021—KB5005102 (OS Build 17763.2145) Preview
  • August 10, 2021—KB5005030 (OS Build 17763.2114)
  • July 27, 2021—KB5005394 (OS Build 17763.2091) Out-of-band
  • July 20, 2021—KB5004308 (OS Build 17763.2090) Preview
  • July 13, 2021—KB5004244 (OS Build 17763.2061)
  • July 6, 2021—KB5004947 (OS Build 17763.2029) Out-of-band
  • June 15, 2021—KB5003703 (OS Build 17763.2028) Preview
  • June 8, 2021—KB5003646 (OS Build 17763.1999)
  • May 20, 2021—KB5003217 (OS Build 17763.1971) Preview
  • May 11, 2021—KB5003171 (OS Build 17763.1935)
  • April 22, 2021—KB5001384 (OS Build 17763.1911) Preview
  • April 13, 2021—KB5001342 (OS Build 17763.1879)
  • March 25, 2021—KB5000854 (OS Build 17763.1852) Preview
  • March 18, 2021—KB5001638 (OS Build 17763.1823) Out-of-band
  • March 15, 2021—KB5001568 (OS Build 17763.1821) Out-of-band
  • March 9, 2021—KB5000822 (OS Build 17763.1817)
  • February 16, 2021—KB4601383 (OS Build 17763.1790) Preview
  • February 9, 2021—KB4601345 (OS Build 17763.1757)
  • January 21, 2021—KB4598296 (OS Build 17763.1728) Preview
  • January 12, 2021—KB4598230 (OS Build 17763.1697)
  • December 8, 2020—KB4592440 (OS Build 17763.1637)
  • November 19, 2020—KB4586839 (OS Build 17763.1613) Preview
  • November 17, 2020—KB4594442 (OS Build 17763.1579) Out-of-band
  • November 10, 2020—KB4586793 (OS Build 17763.1577)
  • October 20, 2020—KB4580390 (OS Build 17763.1554) Preview
  • October 13, 2020—KB4577668 (OS Build 17763.1518)
  • September 16, 2020—KB4577069 (OS Build 17763.1490) Preview
  • September 8, 2020—KB4570333 (OS Build 17763.1457)
  • August 20, 2020—KB4571748 (OS Build 17763.1432) Preview
  • August 11, 2020—KB4565349 (OS Build 17763.1397)
  • July 21, 2020—KB4559003 (OS Build 17763.1369)
  • July 14, 2020—KB4558998 (OS Build 17763.1339)
  • June 16, 2020—KB4567513 (OS Build 17763.1294)
  • June 9, 2020—KB4561608 (OS Build 17763.1282)
  • May 12, 2020—KB4551853 (OS Build 17763.1217)
  • April 21, 2020—KB4550969 (OS Build 17763.1192)
  • April 14, 2020—KB4549949 (OS Build 17763.1158)
  • March 30, 2020—KB4554354 (OS Build 17763.1132)
  • March 17, 2020—KB4541331 (OS Build 17763.1131)
  • March 10, 2020—KB4538461 (OS Build 17763.1098)
  • February 25, 2020—KB4537818 (OS Build 17763.1075)
  • February 11, 2020—KB4532691 (OS Build 17763.1039)
  • January 23, 2020—KB4534321 (OS Build 17763.1012)
  • January 14, 2020—KB4534273 (OS Build 17763.973)
  • December 10, 2019—KB4530715 (OS Build 17763.914)
  • November 12, 2019—KB4523205 (OS Build 17763.864)
  • October 15, 2019—KB4520062 (OS Build 17763.832)
  • October 8, 2019—KB4519338 (OS Build 17763.805)
  • October 3, 2019—KB4524148 (OS Build 17763.775)
  • September 24, 2019—KB4516077 (OS Build 17763.774)
  • September 23, 2019—KB4522015 (OS Build 17763.740)
  • September 10, 2019—KB4512578 (OS Build 17763.737)
  • August 17, 2019—KB4512534 (OS Build 17763.720)
  • August 13, 2019—KB4511553 (OS Build 17763.678)
  • July 22, 2019—KB4505658 (OS Build 17763.652)
  • July 9, 2019—KB4507469 (OS Build 17763.615)
  • June 26, 2019—KB4509479 (OS Build 17763.593)
  • June 18, 2019—KB4501371 (OS Build 17763.592)
  • June 11, 2019—KB4503327 (OS Build 17763.557)
  • May 21, 2019—KB4497934 (OS Build OS 17763.529)
  • May 19, 2019—KB4505056 (OS Build 17763.504)
  • May 14, 2019—KB4494441 (OS Build 17763.503)
  • May 3, 2019—KB4495667 (OS Build 17763.475)
  • May 1, 2019—KB4501835 (OS Build 17763.439)
  • April 9, 2019—KB4493509 (OS Build 17763.437)
  • March 26, 2019—KB4490481 (OS Build 17763.402)
  • March 12, 2019—KB4489899 (OS Build 17763.379)
  • March 1, 2019—KB4482887 (OS Build 17763.348)
  • February 12, 2019—KB4487044 (OS Build 17763.316)
  • January 22, 2019—KB4476976 (OS Build 17763.292)
  • January 8, 2019—KB4480116 (OS Build 17763.253)
  • December 19, 2018—KB4483235 (OS Build 17763.195)
  • December 11, 2018—KB4471332 (OS Build 17763.194)
  • December 5, 2018—KB4469342 (OS Build 17763.168)
  • November 13, 2018—KB4464455 (OS Build 17763.107)
  • November 13, 2018—KB4467708 (OS Build 17763.134)
  • October 9, 2018—KB4464330 (OS Build 17763.55)

Windows 10, version 1803 update history

  • Windows 10, version 1803 update history
  • End of service statement
  • May 11, 2021—KB5003174 (OS Build 17134.2208)
  • April 13, 2021—KB5001339 (OS Build 17134.2145)
  • March 18, 2021—KB5001634 (OS Build 17134.2090) Out-of-band
  • March 15, 2021—KB5001565 (OS Build 17134.2088) Out-of-band
  • March 9, 2021—KB5000809 (OS Build 17134.2087)
  • February 9, 2021—KB4601354 (OS Build 17134.2026)
  • January 12, 2021—KB4598245 (OS Build 17134.1967)
  • December 8, 2020—KB4592446 (OS Build 17134.1902)
  • November 10, 2020—KB4586785 (OS Build 17134.1845)
  • October 13, 2020—KB4580330 (OS Build 17134.1792)
  • September 8, 2020—KB4577032 (OS Build 17134.1726)
  • August 11, 2020—KB4571709 (OS Build 17134.1667)
  • July 14, 2020—KB4565489 (OS Build 17134.1610)
  • June 16, 2020—KB4567514 (OS Build 17134.1553)
  • June 9, 2020—KB4561621 (OS Build 17134.1550)
  • May 12, 2020—KB4556807 (OS Build 17134.1488)
  • April 21, 2020—KB4550944 (OS Build 17134.1456)
  • April 14, 2020—KB4550922 (OS Build 17134.1425)
  • March 30, 2020—KB4554349 (OS Build 17134.1401)
  • March 17, 2020—KB4541333 (OS Build 17134.1399)
  • March 10, 2020—KB4540689 (OS Build 17134.1365)
  • February 25, 2020—KB4537795 (OS Build 17134.1345)
  • February 11, 2020—KB4537762 (OS Build 17134.1304)
  • January 23, 2020—KB4534308 (OS Build 17134.1276)
  • January 14, 2020—KB4534293 (OS Build 17134.1246)
  • December 10, 2019—KB4530717 (OS Build 17134.1184)
  • November 12, 2019—KB4525237 (OS Build 17134.1130)
  • October 15, 2019—KB4519978 (OS Build 17134.1099)
  • October 8, 2019—KB4520008 (OS Build 17134.1069)
  • October 3, 2019—KB4524149 (OS Build 17134.1040)
  • September 24, 2019—KB4516045 (OS Build 17134.1039)
  • September 23, 2019—KB4522014 (OS Build 17134.1009)
  • September 10, 2019—KB4516058 (OS Build 17134.1006)
  • August 19, 2019—KB4512509 (OS Build 17134.984)
  • August 13, 2019—KB4512501 (OS Build 17134.950)
  • July 16, 2019—KB4507466 (OS Build 17134.915)
  • July 9, 2019—KB4507435 (OS Build 17134.885)
  • June 26, 2019—KB4509478 (OS Build 17134.860)
  • June 18, 2019—KB4503288 (OS Build 17134.858)
  • June 11, 2019—KB4503286 (OS Build 17134.829)
  • May 21, 2019—KB4499183 (OS Build 17134.799)
  • May 19, 2019—KB4505064 (OS Build 17134.766)
  • May 14, 2019—KB4499167 (OS Build 17134.765)
  • April 25, 2019—KB4493437 (OS Build 17134.753)
  • April 9, 2019—KB4493464 (OS Build 17134.706)
  • March 19, 2019—KB4489894 (OS Build 17134.677)
  • March 12, 2019—KB4489868 (OS Build 17134.648)
  • February 19, 2019—KB4487029 (OS Build 17134.619)
  • February 12, 2019—KB4487017 (OS Build 17134.590)
  • January 15, 2019—KB4480976 (OS Build 17134.556)
  • January 8, 2019—KB4480966 (OS Build 17134.523)
  • December 19, 2018—KB4483234 (OS Build 17134.472)
  • December 11, 2018—KB4471324 (OS Build 17134.471)
  • November 27, 2018—KB4467682 (OS Build 17134.441)
  • November 13, 2018—KB4467702 (OS Build 17134.407)
  • October 24, 2018—KB4462933 (OS Build 17134.376)
  • October 9, 2018—KB4462919 (OS Build 17134.345)
  • September 26, 2018—KB4458469 (OS Build 17134.320)
  • September 17, 2018—KB4464218 (OS Build 17134.286)
  • September 11, 2018—KB4457128 (OS Build 17134.285)
  • August 30, 2018—KB4346783 (OS Build 17134.254)
  • August 14, 2018—KB4343909 (OS Build 17134.228)
  • July 24, 2018—KB4340917 (OS Build 17134.191)
  • July 16, 2018—KB4345421 (OS Build 17134.167)
  • July 10, 2018—KB4338819 (OS Build 17134.165)
  • June 26, 2018—KB4284848 (OS Build 17134.137)
  • June 12, 2018—KB4284835 (OS Build 17134.112)
  • June 5, 2018—KB4338548 (OS Build 17134.83)
  • May 23, 2018—KB4100403 (OS Build 17134.81)
  • May 8, 2018—KB4103721 (OS Build 17134.48)

Windows 10, version 1709 update history

  • Windows 10, version 1709 update history
  • End of service statement
  • October 13, 2020—KB4580328 (OS Build 16299.2166)
  • September 8, 2020—KB4577041 (OS Build 16299.2107)
  • August 11, 2020—KB4571741 (OS Build 16299.2045)
  • July 14, 2020—KB4565508 (OS Build 16299.1992)
  • June 18, 2020—KB4567515 (OS Build 16299.1937)
  • June 9, 2020—KB4561602 (OS Build 16299.1932)
  • May 12, 2020—KB4556812 (OS Build 16299.1868)
  • April 14, 2020—KB4550927 (OS Build 16299.1806)
  • March 30, 2020—KB4554342 (OS Build 16299.1776)
  • March 17, 2020—KB4541330 (OS Build 16299.1775)
  • March 10, 2020—KB4540681 (OS Build 16299.1747)
  • February 25, 2020—KB4537816 (OS Build 16299.1717)
  • February 11, 2020—KB4537789 (OS Build 16299.1686)
  • January 23, 2020—KB4534318 (OS Build 16299.1654)
  • January 14, 2020—KB4534276 (OS Build 16299.1625)
  • January 14, 2020—KB4535289 Update for Windows 10 Mobile (OS Build 15254.603)
  • December 10, 2019—KB4530714 (OS Build 16299.1565)
  • December 10, 2019—KB4522812 Update for Windows 10 Mobile (OS Build 15254.600)
  • November 12, 2019—KB4522811 Update for Windows 10 Mobile (OS Build 15254.597)
  • November 12, 2019—KB4525241 (OS Build 16299.1508)
  • October 15, 2019—KB4520006 (OS Build 16299.1481)
  • October 8, 2019—KB4522809 Update for Windows 10 Mobile (OS Build 15254.590)
  • October 8, 2019—KB4520004 (OS Build 16299.1451)
  • October 3, 2019—KB4524150 (OS Build 16299.1421)
  • September 24, 2019—KB4516071 (OS Build 16299.1420)
  • September 23, 2019—KB4522012 (OS Build 16299.1392)
  • September 10, 2019—KB4516066 (OS Build 16299.1387)
  • September 10, 2019—KB4518514 Update for Windows 10 Mobile (OS Build 15254.587)
  • August 16, 2019—KB4512494 (OS Build 16299.1365)
  • August 13, 2019—KB4512516 (OS Build 16299.1331)
  • August 13, 2019—KB4513172 Update for Windows 10 Mobile (OS Build 15254.582)
  • July 16, 2019—KB4507465 (OS Build 16299.1296 )
  • July 9, 2019—KB4507455 (OS Build 16299.1268)
  • July 9, 2019—KB4509104 Update for Windows 10 Mobile (OS Build 15254.575)
  • June 26, 2019—KB4509477 (OS Build 16299.1239)
  • June 18, 2019—KB4503281 (OS Build 16299.1237)
  • June 11, 2019—KB4503284 (OS Build 16299.1217)
  • June 11, 2019—KB4505390 Update for Windows 10 Mobile (OS Build 15254.572)
  • May 28, 2019—KB4499147 (OS Build 16299.1182)
  • May 19, 2019—KB4505062 (OS Build 16299.1150)
  • May 14, 2019—KB4500154 Update for Windows 10 Mobile (OS Build 15254.566)
  • May 14, 2019—KB4499179 (OS Build 16299.1146)
  • April 25, 2019—KB4493440 (OS Build 16299.1127)
  • April 9, 2019—KB4495357 Update for Windows 10 Mobile (OS Build 15254.562)
  • April 9, 2019—KB4493441 (OS Build 16299.1087)
  • March 19, 2019—KB4489890 (OS Build 16299.1059)
  • March 12, 2019—KB4489886 (OS Build 16299.1029)
  • March 12, 2019—KB4491736 Update for Windows 10 Mobile (OS Build 15254.556)
  • February 19, 2019—KB4487021 (OS Build 16299.1004)
  • February 12, 2019—KB4487695 Update for Windows 10 Mobile (OS Build 15254.552)
  • February 12, 2019—KB4486996 (OS Build 16299.967)
  • January 15, 2019—KB4480967 (OS Build 16299.936)
  • January 8, 2019—KB4480978 (OS Build 16299.904)
  • January 8, 2019—KB4483203 Update for Windows 10 Mobile (OS Build 15254.547)
  • December 19, 2018—KB4483232 (OS Build 16299.847)
  • December 11, 2018—KB4478936 Update for Windows 10 Mobile (OS Build 15254.544)
  • December 11, 2018—KB4471329 (OS Build 16299.846)
  • November 27, 2018—KB4467681 (OS Build 16299.820)
  • November 13, 2018—KB4469220 Update for Windows 10 Mobile (OS Build 15254.541)
  • November 13, 2018—KB4467686 (OS Build 16299.785)
  • October 18, 2018—KB4462932 (OS Build 16299.755)
  • October 9, 2018—KB4464853 Update for Windows 10 Mobile (OS Build 15254.538)
  • October 9, 2018—KB4462918 (OS Build 16299.726)
  • September 26, 2018—KB4457136 (OS Build 16299.699)
  • September 17, 2018—KB4464217 (OS Build 16299.666)
  • September 11, 2018—KB4457142 (OS Build 16299.665)
  • September 11, 2018—KB4459082 Update for Windows 10 Mobile (OS Build 15254.530)
  • August 30, 2018—KB4343893 (OS Build 16299.637)
  • August 14, 2018—KB4346644 Update for Windows 10 Mobile (OS Build 15254.527)
  • August 14, 2018—KB4343897 (OS Build 16299.611)
  • July 24, 2018—KB4338817 (OS Build 16299.579)
  • July 16, 2018—KB4345420 (OS Build 16299.551)
  • July 10, 2018—KB4338825 (OS Build 16299.547)
  • June 21, 2018—KB4284822 (OS Build 16299.522)
  • June 12, 2018—KB4316692 Update for Windows 10 Mobile (OS Build 15254.489)
  • June 12, 2018—KB4284819 (OS Build 16299.492)
  • May 21, 2018—KB4103714 (OS Build 16299.461)
  • May 8, 2018—KB4134196 Update for Windows 10 Mobile (OS Build 15254.401)
  • May 8, 2018—KB4103727 (OS Build 16299.431)
  • April 23, 2018—KB4093105 (OS Build 16299.402)
  • April 10, 2018—KB4099572 Update for Windows 10 Mobile (OS Build 15254.369)
  • April 10, 2018—KB4093112 (OS Build 16299.371)
  • March 22, 2018—KB4089848 (OS Build 16299.334)
  • March 15, 2018—KB4090912 Update for Windows 10 Mobile (OS Build 15254.313)
  • March 13, 2018—KB4088776 (OS Build 16299.309)
  • March 5, 2018—KB4090913 (OS Build 16299.251)
  • February 14, 2018—KB4077675 (OS Build 15254.248)
  • February 13, 2018—KB4074588 (OS Build 16299.248)
  • January 31, 2018—KB4058258 (OS Build 16299.214)
  • January 18, 2018—KB4073291 (OS Build 16299.201)
  • January 5, 2018—KB4073117 (OS Build 15254.158)
  • January 3, 2018—KB4056892 (OS Build 16299.192)
  • December 12, 2017—KB4054517 (OS Build 16299.125)
  • December 12, 2017—KB4056342 Update for Windows 10 Mobile (OS Build 15254.124)
  • November 30, 2017—KB4051963 (OS Build 16299.98)
  • November 14, 2017—KB4048955 (OS Build 16299.64)
  • November 14, 2017—KB4052314 (OS Build 15254.12)
  • October 17, 2017—KB4043961 (OS Build 16299.19)

Windows 10, version 1703 update history

  • Windows 10, version 1703 update history
  • End of service statement
  • March 9, 2021—KB5000812 (OS Build 15063.2679)
  • February 9, 2021—KB4601330 (OS Build 15063.2642)
  • January 12, 2021—KB4599208 (OS Build 15063.2614)
  • December 8, 2020—KB4592473 (OS Build 15063.2584)
  • November 10, 2020—KB4586782 (OS Build 15063.2554)
  • October 13, 2020—KB4580370 (OS Build 15063.2525)
  • September 8, 2020—KB4577021 (OS Build 15063.2500)
  • August 11, 2020—KB4571689 (OS Build 15063.2467)
  • July 14, 2020—KB4565499 (OS Build 15063.2439)
  • June 18, 2020—KB4567516 (OS Build 15063.2411)
  • June 9, 2020—KB4561605 (OS Build 15063.2409)
  • May 12, 2020—KB4556804 (OS Build 15063.2375)
  • April 14, 2020—KB4550939 (OS Build 15063.2346)
  • March 10, 2020—KB4540705 (OS Build 15063.2313)
  • February 11, 2020—KB4537765 (OS Build 15063.2284)
  • January 14, 2020—KB4534296 (OS Build 15063.2254)
  • December 10, 2019—KB4530711 (OS Build 15063.2224)
  • November 12, 2019—KB4525245 (OS Build 15063.2172)
  • October 8, 2019—KB4520010 (OS Build 15063.2108)
  • October 3, 2019—KB4524151 (OS Build 15063.2079)
  • September 24, 2019—KB4516059 (OS Build 15063.2078)
  • September 23, 2019—KB4522011 (OS Build 15063.2046)
  • September 10, 2019—KB4516068 (OS Build 15063.2045)
  • August 17, 2019—KB4512474 (OS Build 15063.2021)
  • August 13, 2019—KB4512507 (OS Build 15063.1988)
  • July 16, 2019—KB4507467 (OS Build 15063.1955)
  • July 9, 2019—KB4507450 (OS Build 15063.1928)
  • June 26, 2019—KB4509476 (OS Build 15063.1898)
  • June 18, 2019—KB4503289 (OS Build 15063.1897)
  • June 11, 2019—KB4503279 (OS Build 15063.1868)
  • May 28, 2019—KB4499162 (OS Build 15063.1839)
  • May 19, 2019—KB4505055 (OS Build 15063.1808)
  • May 14, 2019—KB4499181 (OS Build 15063.1805)
  • May 2, 2019—KB4502112 (OS Build 15063.1785)
  • April 25, 2019—KB4493436 (OS Build 15063.1784)
  • April 9, 2019—KB4493474 (OS Build 15063.1746)
  • March 19, 2019—KB4489888 (OS Build 15063.1716)
  • March 12, 2019—KB4489871 (OS Build 15063.1689)
  • February 19, 2019—KB4487011 (OS Build 15063.1659)
  • February 12, 2019—KB4487020 (OS Build 15063.1631)
  • January 15, 2019—KB4480959 (OS Build 15063.1596)
  • January 8, 2019—KB4480973 (OS Build 15063.1563)
  • December 19, 2018—KB4483230 (OS Build 15063.1508)
  • December 11, 2018—KB4471327 (OS Build 15063.1506)
  • November 27, 2018—KB4467699 (OS Build 15063.1478)
  • November 13, 2018—KB4467696 (OS Build 15063.1446)
  • October 18, 2018—KB4462939 (OS Build 15063.1418)
  • October 9, 2018—KB4462937 (OS Build 15063.1387)
  • September 20, 2018—KB4457141 (OS Build 15063.1358)
  • September 11, 2018—KB4457138 (OS Build 15063.1324)
  • August 30, 2018—KB4343889 (OS Build 15063.1292)
  • August 14, 2018—KB4343885 (OS Build 15063.1266)
  • July 24, 2018—KB4338827 (OS Build 15063.1235)
  • July 16, 2018—KB4345419 (OS Build 15063.1209)
  • July 10, 2018—KB4338826 (OS Build 15063.1206)
  • June 21, 2018—KB4284830 (OS Build 15063.1182)
  • June 12, 2018—KB4284874 (OS Build 15063.1155)
  • May 17, 2018—KB4103722 (OS Build 15063.1112)
  • May 8, 2018—KB4103731 (OS Build 15063.1088)
  • April 17, 2018—KB4093117 (OS Build 15063.1058)
  • April 10, 2018—KB4093107 (OS Build 15063.1029)
  • March 22, 2018—KB4088891 (OS Build 15063.994)
  • March 13, 2018—KB4088782 (OS Build 15063.966 and 15063.968)
  • March 8, 2018—KB4092077 (OS Build 15063.936)
  • February 22, 2018—KB4077528 (OS Build 15063.936)
  • February 13, 2018—KB4074592 (OS Build 15063.909)
  • January 17, 2018—KB4057144 (OS Build 15063.877)
  • January 3, 2018—KB4056891 (OS Build 15063.850)
  • December 12, 2017—KB4053580 (OS Build 15063.786)
  • November 22, 2017—KB4055254 (OS Build 15063.729)
  • November 14, 2017—KB4048954 (OS Build 15063.726 and 15063.728)
  • November 2, 2017—KB4049370 (OS Build 15063.675)
  • October 10, 2017—KB4041676 (OS Build 15063.674)
  • September 25, 2017—KB4040724 (OS Build 15063.632)
  • September 12, 2017—KB4038788 (OS Build 15063.608)
  • August 8, 2017—KB4034674 (OS Build 15063.540)
  • July 31, 2017—KB4032188 (OS Build 15063.502)
  • July 11, 2017—KB4025342 (OS Build 15063.483)
  • June 27, 2017—KB4022716 (OS Build 15063.447)
  • June 13, 2017—KB4022725 (OS Build 15063.413 and 15063.414)
  • May 25, 2017—KB4020102 (OS Build 15063.332)
  • May 9, 2017—KB4016871 (OS Build 15063.296 and 15063.297)
  • April 25, 2017—KB4016240 (OS Build 15063.250)
  • April 11, 2017—KB4015583 (OS Build 15063.138)
  • April 5, 2017—KB4016251 (OS Build 15063.13)

Windows 10, version 1607 and Windows Server 2016 update history

  • Windows 10, version 1607 and Windows Server 2016 update history
  • October 12, 2021—KB5006669 (OS Build 14393.4704)
  • September 14, 2021—KB5005573 (OS Build 14393.4651)
  • August 10, 2021—KB5005043 (OS Build 14393.4583)
  • July 29, 2021—KB5005393 (OS Build 14393.4532) Out-of-band
  • July 13, 2021—KB5004238 (OS Build 14393.4530)
  • July 7, 2021—KB5004948 (OS Build 14393.4470) Out-of-band
  • June 8, 2021—KB5003638 (OS Build 14393.4467)
  • May 11, 2021—KB5003197 (OS Build 14393.4402)
  • April 13, 2021—KB5001347 (OS Build 14393.4350)
  • March 18, 2021—KB5001633 (OS Build 14393.4288) Out-of-band
  • March 9, 2021—KB5000803 (OS Build 14393.4283)
  • February 9, 2021—KB4601318 (OS Build 14393.4225)
  • January 12, 2021—KB4598243 (OS Build 14393.4169)
  • December 8, 2020—KB4593226 (OS Build 14393.4104)
  • November 19, 2020—KB4594441 (OS Build 14393.4048) Out-of-band
  • November 10, 2020—KB4586830 (OS Build 14393.4046)
  • October 13, 2020—KB4580346 (OS Build 14393.3986)
  • September 8, 2020—KB4577015 (OS Build 14393.3930)
  • August 11, 2020—KB4571694 (OS Build 14393.3866)
  • July 14, 2020—KB4565511 (OS Build 14393.3808)
  • June 18, 2020—KB4567517 (OS Build 14393.3755)
  • June 9, 2020—KB4561616 (OS Build 14393.3750)
  • May 12, 2020—KB4556813 (OS Build 14393.3686)
  • April 21, 2020—KB4550947 (OS Build 14393.3659)
  • April 14, 2020—KB4550929 (OS Build 14393.3630)
  • March 17, 2020—KB4541329 (OS Build 14393.3595)
  • March 10, 2020—KB4540670 (OS Build 14393.3564)
  • February 25, 2020—KB4537806 (OS Build 14393.3542)
  • February 11, 2020—KB4537764 (OS Build 14393.3504)
  • January 23, 2020—KB4534307 (OS Build 14393.3474)
  • January 14, 2020—KB4534271 (OS Build 14393.3443)
  • December 10, 2019—KB4530689 (OS Build 14393.3384)
  • November 12, 2019—KB4525236 (OS Build 14393.3326)
  • October 15, 2019—KB4519979 (OS Build 14393.3300)
  • October 8, 2019—KB4519998 (OS Build 14393.3274)
  • October 3, 2019—KB4524152 (OS Build 14393.3243)
  • September 24, 2019—KB4516061 (OS Build 14393.3242)
  • September 23, 2019—KB4522010 (OS Build 14393.3206)
  • September 10, 2019—KB4516044 (OS Build 14393.3204)
  • August 17, 2019—KB4512495 (OS Build 14393.3181)
  • August 13, 2019—KB4512517 (OS Build 14393.3144)
  • July 16, 2019—KB4507459 (OS Build 14393.3115)
  • July 9, 2019—KB4507460 (OS Build 14393.3085)
  • June 27, 2019—KB4509475 (OS Build 14393.3056)
  • June 18, 2019—KB4503294 (OS Build 14393.3053)
  • June 11, 2019—KB4503267 (OS Build 14393.3025)
  • May 23, 2019—KB4499177 (OS Build 14393.2999)
  • May 19, 2019—KB4505052 (OS Build 14393.2972)
  • May 14, 2019—KB4494440 (OS Build 14393.2969)
  • April 25, 2019—KB4493473 (OS Build 14393.2941)
  • April 9, 2019—KB4493470 (OS Build 14393.2906)
  • March 19, 2019—KB4489889 (OS Build 14393.2879)
  • March 12, 2019—KB4489882 (OS Build 14393.2848)
  • February 19, 2019—KB4487006 (OS Build 14393.2828)
  • February 12, 2019—KB4487026 (OS Build 14393.2791)
  • January 17, 2019—KB4480977 (OS Build 14393.2759)
  • January 8, 2019—KB4480961 (OS Build 14393.2724)
  • December 19, 2018—KB4483229 (OS Build 14393.2670)
  • December 11, 2018—KB4471321 (OS Build 14393.2665)
  • December 3, 2018—KB4478877 (OS Build 14393.2641)
  • November 27, 2018—KB4467684 (OS Build 14393.2639)
  • November 13, 2018—KB4467691 (OS Build 14393.2608)
  • October 18, 2018—KB4462928 (OS Build 14393.2580)
  • October 9, 2018—KB4462917 (OS Build 14393.2551)
  • September 20, 2018—KB4457127 (OS Build 14393.2515)
  • September 11, 2018—KB4457131 (OS Build 14393.2485)
  • August 30, 2018—KB4343884 (OS Build 14393.2457)
  • August 14, 2018—KB4343887 (OS Build 14393.2430)
  • July 30, 2018 - KB4346877 (OS Build 14393.2396)
  • July 24, 2018—KB4338822 (OS Build 14393.2395)
  • July 16, 2018—KB4345418 (OS Build 14393.2368)
  • July 10, 2018—KB4338814 (OS Build 14393.2363)
  • June 21, 2018—KB4284833 (OS Build 14393.2339)
  • June 12, 2018—KB4284880 (OS Build 14393.2312)
  • May 17, 2018—KB4103720 (OS Build 14393.2273)
  • May 8, 2018—KB4103723 (OS Build 14393.2248)
  • April 17, 2018—KB4093120 (OS Build 14393.2214)
  • April 10, 2018—KB4093119 (OS Build 14393.2189)
  • March 29, 2018—KB4096309 (OS Build 14393.2156)
  • March 22, 2018—KB4088889 (OS Build 14393.2155)
  • March 13, 2018—KB4088787 (OS Build 14393.2125 and 14393.2126)
  • February 22, 2018—KB4077525 (OS Build 14393.2097)
  • February 13, 2018—KB4074590 (OS Build 14393.2068)
  • January 17, 2018—KB4057142 (OS Build 14393.2034)
  • January 3, 2018—KB4056890 (OS Build 14393.2007)
  • December 12, 2017—KB4053579 (OS Build 14393.1944)
  • November 27, 2017—KB4051033 (OS Build 14393.1914)
  • November 14, 2017—KB4048953 (OS Build 14393.1884)
  • November 2, 2017—KB4052231 (OS Build 14393.1797)
  • October 17, 2017—KB4041688 (OS Build 14393.1794)
  • October 10, 2017—KB4041691 (OS Build 14393.1770)
  • September 28, 2017—KB4038801 (OS Build 14393.1737)
  • September 12, 2017—KB4038782 (OS Build 14393.1715)
  • August 28, 2017—KB4039396 (OS Build 14393.1670)
  • August 16, 2017—KB4034661 (OS Build 14393.1613)
  • August 8, 2017—KB4034658 (OS Build 14393.1593)
  • August 7, 2017—KB4038220 (OS Build 14393.1537)
  • July 18, 2017—KB4025334 (OS Build 14393.1532)
  • July 11, 2017—KB4025339 (OS Build 14393.1480)
  • June 27, 2017—KB4022723 (OS Build 14393.1378)
  • June 13, 2017—KB4022715 (OS Build 14393.1358)
  • May 26, 2017—KB4023680 (OS Build 14393.1230)
  • May 9, 2017—KB4019472 (OS Build 14393.1198)
  • April 11, 2017—KB4015217 (OS Build 14393.1066 and 14393.1083)
  • March 22, 2017—KB4016635 (OS Build 14393.970)
  • March 20, 2017—KB4015438 (OS Build 14393.969)
  • March 14, 2017—KB4013429 (OS Build 14393.953)
  • January 30, 2017—KB4010672 (OS Build 14393.729)
  • January 26, 2017—KB 3216755 (OS Build 14393.726)
  • January 10, 2017—KB3213986 (OS Build 14393.693)
  • December 13, 2016 — KB3206632 (OS Build 14393.571)
  • December 9, 2016 — KB3201845 (OS Build 14393.479)
  • November 9, 2016 — KB3200970 (OS Build 14393.448)
  • November 8, 2016 — KB3200970 (OS Build 14393.447)
  • October 27, 2016 — KB3197954 (OS Build 14393.351)
  • October 11, 2016 — KB3194798 (OS Build 14393.321)
  • September 29, 2016 — KB3194496 (OS Builds 14393.222)
  • September 20, 2016 — KB3193494 (OS Builds 14393.187 and 14393.189)
  • September 13, 2016 — KB3189866 (OS Builds 14393.187 and 14393.189)
  • August 31, 2016 — KB3176938 (OS Build 14393.105)
  • August 23, 2016 — KB3176934 (OS Build 14393.82)
  • August 9, 2016 — KB3176495 (OS Build 14393.51)
  • August 2, 2016 — KB3176929 (OS Build 14393.10)

Windows 10, version 1511 update history

  • Windows 10, version 1511 update history
  • End of service statement
  • April 10, 2018—KB4093109 (OS Build 10586.1540)
  • March 13, 2018—KB4088779 (OS Build 10586.1478)
  • February 13, 2018—KB4074591 (OS Build 10586.1417)
  • January 18, 2018—KB4075200 (OS Build 10586.1358)
  • January 3, 2018—KB4056888 (OS Build 10586.1356)
  • December 12, 2017—KB4053578 (OS Build 10586.1295)
  • November 14, 2017—KB4048952 (OS Build 10586.1232)
  • November 2, 2017—KB4052232 (OS Build 10586.1177)
  • October 10, 2017—KB4041689 (OS Build 10586.1176)
  • September 12, 2017—KB4038783 (OS Build 10586.1106)
  • August 8, 2017—KB4034660 (OS Build 10586.1045)
  • July 11, 2017—KB4025344 (OS Build 10586.1007)
  • June 27, 2017—KB4032693 (OS Build 10586.965)
  • June 13, 2017—KB4022714 (OS Build 10586.962)
  • May 9, 2017—KB4019473 (OS Build 10586.916)
  • April 11, 2017—KB4015219 (OS Build 10586.873)
  • March 22, 2017—KB4016636 (OS Build 10586.842)
  • March 14, 2017—KB4013198 (OS Build 10586.839)
  • January 10, 2017—KB3210721 (OS Build 10586.753)
  • December 13, 2016 — KB3205386 (OS Build 10586.713)
  • November 14, 2016 — KB3198586 (OS Build 10586.682)
  • November 8, 2016 — KB3198586 (OS Build 10586.679)
  • October 11, 2016 — KB3192441 (OS Build 10586.633)
  • September 13, 2016 — KB3185614 (OS Build 10586.589)
  • August 9, 2016 — KB3176493 (OS Build 10586.545)
  • July 12, 2016 — KB3172985 (OS Build 10586.494)
  • June 14, 2016 — KB3163018 (OS Build 10586.420)
  • May 10, 2016 — KB3156421 (OS Build 10586.318)
  • April 12, 2016 — KB3147458 (OS Build 10586.218)
  • March 8, 2016 — KB3140768 (OS Build 10586.164)
  • March 1, 2016 — KB3140743 (OS Build 10586.122)
  • February 9, 2016 — KB3135173 (OS Build 10586.104)

Windows 10 (initial version released July 2015) update history

  • Windows 10 (initial version released July 2015) update history
  • October 12, 2021-KB5006675 (OS Build 10240.19086)
  • September 14, 2021-KB5005569 (OS Build 10240.19060)
  • August 10, 2021-KB5005040 (OS Build 10240.19022)
  • July 13, 2021-KB5004249 (OS Build 10240.19003)
  • July 6, 2021—KB5004950 (OS Build 10240.18969) Out-of-band
  • June 8, 2021-KB5003687 (OS Build 10240.18967)
  • May 11, 2021-KB5003172 (OS Build 10240.18932)
  • April 13, 2021-KB5001340 (OS Build 10240.18906)
  • March 18, 2021-KB5001631 (OS Build 10240.18875) Out-of-band
  • March 9, 2021-KB5000807 (OS Build 10240.18874)
  • February 9, 2021-KB4601331 (OS Build 10240.18842)
  • January 12, 2021-KB4598231 (OS Build 10240.18818)
  • December 8, 2020-KB4592464 (OS Build 10240.18782)
  • November 10, 2020-KB4586787 (OS Build 10240.18756)
  • October 13, 2020-KB4580327 (OS Build 10240.18725)
  • September 8, 2020-KB4577049 (OS Build 10240.18696)
  • August 11, 2020-KB4571692 (OS Build 10240.18666)
  • July 14, 2020-KB4565513 (OS Build 10240.18638)
  • June 18, 2020-KB4567518 (OS Build 10240.18609)
  • June 9, 2020-KB4561649 (OS Build 10240.18608)
  • May 12, 2020-KB4556826 (OS Build 10240.18575)
  • April 14, 2020-KB4550930 (OS Build 10240.18545)
  • March 10, 2020-KB4540693 (OS Build 10240.18519)
  • February 11, 2020-KB4537776 (OS Build 10240.18486)
  • January 14, 2020-KB4534306 (OS Build 10240.18453)
  • December 10, 2019-KB4530681 (OS Build 10240.18427)
  • November 12, 2019-KB4525232 (OS Build 10240.18395)
  • October 8, 2019-KB4520011 (OS Build 10240.18368)
  • October 3, 2019-KB4524153 (OS Build 10240.18335)
  • September 23, 2019-KB4522009 (OS Build 10240.18334)
  • September 10, 2019-KB4516070 (OS Build 10240.18333)
  • August 17, 2019-KB4517276 (OS Build 10240.18308)
  • August 13, 2019-KB4512497 (OS Build 10240.18305)
  • July 9, 2019-KB4507458 (OS Build 10240.18275)
  • June 11, 2019-KB4503291 (OS Build 10240.18244)
  • May 19, 2019-KB4505051 (OS Build 10240.18218)
  • May 14, 2019-KB4499154 (OS Build 10240.18215)
  • April 25, 2019-KB4498375 (OS Build 10240.18187)
  • April 9, 2019-KB4493475 (OS Build 10240.18186)
  • March 12, 2019-KB4489872 (OS Build 10240.18158)
  • February 21, 2019-KB4491101 (OS Build 10240.18135)
  • February 12, 2019-KB4487018 (OS Build 10240.18132)
  • January 8, 2019-KB4480962 (OS Build 10240.18094)
  • December 19, 2018-KB4483228 (OS Build 10240.18064)
  • December 11, 2018-KB4471323 (OS Build 10240.18063)
  • November 13, 2018-KB4467680 (OS Build 10240.18036)
  • October 9, 2018-KB4462922 (OS Build 10240.18005)
  • September 11, 2018-KB4457132 (OS Build 10240.17976)
  • August 14, 2018—KB4343892 (OS Build 10240.17946)
  • July 16, 2018—KB4345455 (OS Build 10240.17918)
  • July 10, 2018—KB4338829 (OS Build 10240.17914)
  • June 12, 2018—KB4284860 (OS Build 10240.17889)
  • May 8, 2018—KB4103716 (OS Build 10240.17861)
  • April 10, 2018—KB4093111 (OS Build 10240.17831)
  • March 13, 2018—KB4088786 (OS Build 10240.17797)
  • February 13, 2018—KB4074596 (OS Build 10240.17770)
  • January 31, 2018—KB4077735 (OS Build 10240.17741)
  • January 18, 2018—KB4075199 (OS Build 10240.17741)
  • January 3, 2018—KB4056893 (OS Build 10240.17738)
  • December 12, 2017—KB4053581 (OS Build 10240.17709)
  • November 14, 2017—KB4048956 (OS Build 10240.17673)
  • October 10, 2017—KB4042895 (OS Build 10240.17643)
  • September 12, 2017—KB4038781 (OS Build 10240.17609)
  • August 8, 2017—KB4034668 (OS Build 10240.17533)
  • July 11, 2017—KB4025338 (OS Build 10240.17488)
  • June 27, 2017—KB4032695 (OS Build 10240.17446)
  • June 13, 2017—KB4022727 (OS Build 10240.17443)
  • May 9, 2017—KB4019474 (OS Build 10240.17394)
  • April 11, 2017—KB4015221 (OS Build 10240.17354)
  • March 22, 2017—KB4016637 (OS Build 10240.17320)
  • March 14, 2017—KB4012606 (OS Build 10240.17319)
  • January 10, 2017—KB3210720 (OS Build 10240.17236)
  • December 13, 2016 — KB3205383 (OS Build 10240.17202)
  • November 8, 2016 — KB3198585 (OS Build 10240.17190)
  • October 11, 2016 — KB3192440 (OS Build 10240.17146)
  • September 20, 2016 — KB3193821 (OS Build 10240.17113)
  • September 13, 2016 — KB3185611 (OS Build 10240.17113)
  • August 9, 2016 — KB3176492 (OS Build 10240.17071)
  • July 12, 2016 — KB3163912 (OS Build 10240.17024)
  • June 14, 2016 — KB3163017 (OS Build 10240.16942)
  • May 10, 2016 — KB3156387 (OS Build 10240.16854)
  • April 12, 2016 — KB3147461 (OS Build 10240.16769)
  • March 8, 2016 — KB3140745 (OS Build 10240.16725)
  • February 9, 2016 — KB3135174 (OS Build 10240.16683)

Windows 10, version 21H1 update history

  • Windows 10, version 21H1 update history
  • October 12, 2021—KB5006670 (OS Builds 19041.1288, 19042.1288, and 19043.1288)
  • September 30, 2021—KB5005611 (OS Builds 19041.1266, 19042.1266, and 19043.1266) Preview
  • September 14, 2021—KB5005565 (OS Builds 19041.1237, 19042.1237, and 19043.1237)
  • September 1, 2021—KB5005101 (OS Builds 19041.1202, 19042.1202, and 19043.1202) Preview
  • August 10, 2021—KB5005033 (OS Builds 19041.1165, 19042.1165, and 19043.1165)
  • July 29, 2021—KB5004296 (OS Builds 19041.1151, 19042.1151, and 19043.1151) Preview
  • July 13, 2021—KB5004237 (OS Builds 19041.1110, 19042.1110, and 19043.1110)
  • July 6, 2021—KB5004945 (OS Builds 19041.1083, 19042.1083, and 19043.1083) Out-of-band
  • June 29, 2021—KB5004760 (OS Builds 19041.1082, 19042.1082, and 19043.1082) Out-of-band
  • June 21, 2021—KB5003690 (OS Builds 19041.1081, 19042.1081, and 19043.1081) Preview
  • June 11, 2021—KB5004476 (OS Builds 19041.1055, 19042.1055, and 19043.1055) Out-of-band
  • June 8, 2021—KB5003637 (OS Builds 19041.1052, 19042.1052, and 19043.1052)
  • May 25, 2021—KB5003214 (OS Builds 19041.1023, 19042.1023, and 19043.1023) Preview
  • May 11, 2021—KB5003173 (OS Builds 19041.985, 19042.985, and 19043.985)
Sours: https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/topic/windows-10-update-history-7dd3071a-3906-fa2c-c342-f7f86728a6e3


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