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PlayStation 2 accessories

Overview of the accessories made for the PlayStation 2

Various accessories for the PlayStation 2 video game console have been produced by Sony, as well as third parties. These include controllers, audio and video input devices like microphones and video cameras, and cables for better sound and picture quality.

Game controllers[edit]

DualShock 2[edit]

Main article: DualShock - DualShock 2

Standard black DualShock 2 controller

The DualShock 2 Analog Controller (SCPH-10010) is the standard controller for the PlayStation 2 and is almost identical to the original DualShock controller for the original PlayStation console with only minor changes. All the buttons other than L3, R3 and "Analog" feature analog pressure sensitivity; the connecting cable is slightly longer than the original DualShock and is black rather than grey; the connector is squarer; DualShock 2 is printed on the top of the controller and it features two more levels of vibration feedback.

Logitech Cordless Action controller[edit]

ManufacturerLogitech
TypeVideo game controller
GenerationSixth generation era
Input

Inputs

    • 2× Analog sticks (8-bit precision)
    • 10× Pressure sensitive buttons
      (Triangle, Circle, Cross, Square, L1, R1, L2, R2, Start, Select)
    • Pressure sensitive D-Pad
    • 3× Digital buttons
      ("Analog", L3, R3)
ConnectivityPlayStation (2) controller port, proprietary 2.4 GHz wireless.
Dimensions
  • 155 × 102 × 60 mm
  • 6.1 × 4 × 2.36 in
SuccessorLogitech Cordless Precision Controller

The Logitech Cordless Action controller is an officially licensed wireless controller for the PlayStation 2 made by Logitech. It features all of the inputs found the standard DualShock 2 controller, i.e. ten analog (pressure-sensitive) buttons (Triangle, Circle, Cross, Square, L1, R1, L2, R2, Start and Select), three digital buttons (L3, R3 and the analog mode button) and two analog sticks. As its buttons are pressure-sensitive, the controller is compatible with games which require a DualShock 2. The controller also features two vibration motors for haptic feedback, which are compatible with DualShock/DualShock 2 enabled games. As a power saving measure, the vibration may be turned on or off by the user by way of a button on the controller's face. It is powered by two AA batteries. It communicates with the console using a proprietary 2.4 GHz RF protocol wireless by way of a dongle which connects to the PS2's controller port in a similar manner to Nintendo's WaveBird wireless controller.

Logitech Cordless Controller[edit]

ManufacturerLogitech
TypeVideo game controller
GenerationSixth generation era
Input

Inputs

    • 2× Analog sticks (8-bit precision)
    • 10× Pressure sensitive buttons
      (Triangle, Circle, Cross, Square, L1, R1, L2, R2, Start, Select)
    • Pressure sensitive D-Pad
    • 3× Digital buttons
      ("Analog", L3, R3)
ConnectivityPlayStation (2) controller port, proprietary 2.4 GHz wireless.

Like the Logitech Cordless Action controller, the Logitech Cordless Controller is an officially licensed wireless PlayStation 2 controller made by Logitech.[1] It features all of the buttons (including analog functionality) of the standard DualShock 2 controller and is compatible with games requiring a DualShock 2.[1] It is powered by two AA batteries, and as a power-saving measure, the vibration function can be turned off. It communicates with the console via a wireless dongle which connects to the PS2's controller port and uses a proprietary 2.4 GHz RF technology.[1]

Sega Saturn PS2 Controller[edit]

The Sega Saturn PS2 Controller is a controller for the PS2 based around the Sega Saturn type-2/Japanese style controller. The controller is officially licensed by both Sony and Sega, and the first version was released in black exclusively in Japan in 2005.[2] A second version was produced in the color purple as part of a joint venture between Sega and Capcom to coincide with the launch of Vampire: Darkstalkers Collection in Japan.[3] Other than the connector, it is almost identical to the original Saturn controller, with a few minor changes. In place of the original Saturn start button are indented PlayStation style start and select buttons. Additionally, the reset, stop, play/pause, rewind and fast-forward labels above the X, Y, Z, L and R buttons have been removed, and labels of the corresponding PlayStation buttons have been added as listed below.[3]

Logitech Driving Force GT[edit]

A Logitech Driving Force GT wheel and pedals

Main article: Logitech Driving Force GT

http://uk.playstation.com/ps2/peripherals/detail/item285752/Driving-Force%E2%84%A2-GT/

Arcade sticks[edit]

Rhythm Game Controllers[edit]

Main article: Rhythm game accessories

Microphones[edit]

Wired Singstar microphones

Various microphones are available for use on the PlayStation 2 with rhythm games such as Sony's own Singstar karaoke games and Harmonix's Rock Band series. Singstar microphones are available in both wired [4] and wireless[5] varieties; both connect to the console via USB.

Dance Mats/Pads[edit]

On certain PS2 Games that are dance pad compatible allows the player to follow alongside on the game actions as the player must perform, they are usually found on games such as, Dance Revolution games.

Buzz! Buzzers[edit]

Wireless Buzzers and USB adapter

Buzz! Buzzers are special controllers designed specifically for the Buzz! quiz game series. The controllers feature large red buzzer buttons and four smaller coloured buttons for answer selection. Both wired[6] and wireless[7] versions are available and come bundled with Buzz! games. A four-buzzer set acts as a single USB device and connects a USB port on the PlayStation 2. Wireless versions connect via a USB dongle, with each dongle able to support up to 4 wireless buzzers at a time. A second dongle is required for additional buzzers (for 8 player games). Both the wired and wireless versions of the buzzers are compatible with both PlayStation 2 and PlayStation 3. The "big button controllers" available for the Xbox 360 heavily resemble buzzers in many respects, and fulfil the same function.

DVD Remote Control[edit]

The DVD remote control is an infra-red remote control for the PlayStation 2 designed to allow easier control of DVD movies. The first remote SCPH-10150 came bundled (as SCPH-10170) with an infra-red receiver dongle SCPH-10160 which attached to one of the PlayStation 2's controller ports; this dongle is not needed on later PS2 models (beginning from SCPH-500xx) and slimline PS2 models (SCPH-700xx to SCPH-900xx) as they feature an integrated IR port.

There are two different models of the DVD remote control released, which only had minor differences. The first released is the SCPH-10150. The second, SCPH-10420, is functionally and visually identical apart from the addition of eject and reset/power buttons. However the eject button will only work on PS2 models SCPH-100xx to -500xx, as the slimline PlayStation 2 models had no motorized disc tray to eject.

Both versions of the remote feature all the standard PS2 buttons in addition to DVD playback controls.

A/V Cables[edit]

PlayStation AV (composite video/stereo audio) cable

Various A/V cables have been made available for the PlayStation 2, which offer varying levels of picture quality. Additionally, the PS2 features a TOSLINK port, which facilitates the output of digital S/PDIF audio - 2-channel LPCM, 5.1-channel Dolby Digital and 5.1-channel DTS (the latter two are only available during DVD playback when it is encoded on the disk). The PS2 is compatible with all PlayStation and PlayStation 3 cables which use the AV-multi port.

RFU adapter[edit]

The RFU Adapter (SCPH-1122) is an RF Modulator and cable that carries mono audio and video at 576i/50 Hz (PAL) or 480i/60 Hz (NTSC) via an RF signal and connects using a TV aerial plug.[8] It is similar to the RFU adapter cable available for the PlayStation.

AV (Composite) cable[edit]

The AV cable (SCPH-10500) is included with the PS2 and carries dual-channel (stereo) audio and composite video at 576i/50 Hz (PAL) or 480i/60 Hz (NTSC). It is identical to the composite cables available for the PlayStation and PlayStation 3. Consoles in PAL territories also come bundled with a composite/stereo SCART adapter block to facilitate connection to SCART enabled TVs. This is merely an adapter and provides no quality improvement over a direct composite connection.

S-Video Cable[edit]

The S-Video cable (SCPH-10060U/97030) carries dual-channel (stereo) audio and s-video at 576i/50 Hz (PAL) or 480i/60 Hz (NTSC), which provides a clearer picture than the standard AV cable.

AV Adaptor[edit]

The AV Adaptor with S Video Out Connector (SCPH-10130) is a break-out box which provides an additional AV-Multi out port, as well as composite, s-video and stereo audio connectors to allow connection to an AV receiver or similar device.[9]

EURO AV (RGB SCART) cable[edit]

The EURO AV Cable (SCPH-10142) is a SCART cable capable of carrying 576i/50 Hz or 480i/60 Hz using the RGB standard, as well as standard stereo audio and composite video. It provides a clearer picture than either s-video or composite signals. The Euro AV Cable can also carry 480p and 1080i signals, but to do so it switches off RGBs (RGB Sync) signals and switches to RGsB (RGB sync on green). This can lead to compatibility issues with certain monitors and even SCART to HDMI upscalers. To use the EURO AV cable, the PS2 must be set to RGB mode in the options.[10]

Component AV cable[edit]

The Component AV Cable (SCPH-10490) is a cable capable of carrying 576i/50 Hz or 480i/60 Hz using the YPBPR and RGB standards, as well as standard stereo audio, via RCA connectors. It provides a clearer picture than either s-video or composite signals. It is also required for games which support other video modes such as "progressive scan" (480p) or 1080i. Most PS1 games output at 240p through the cable, which may cause compatibility issues with some newer TV's. To use the Component AV cable, the PS2 must be set to YPBPR mode in the options.[11][12]

D-Terminal cable[edit]

The D-Terminal cable is identical to the component cable other than its connector. It was sold only in Japan and uses the Japanese D-Terminal standard.

VGA Cable[edit]

The PlayStation 2 VGA cable carries RGBHV video via a VGA connector. It is only compatible with progressive scan games and PS2 Linux. Since the PS2 does not output separate sync, sync on green must be used instead, which may be incompatible with some monitors.

Other accessories[edit]

Memory Card[edit]

The Memory Card (8 MB) (SCPH-10020) Magic Gate is used to store settings, EyeToy video messages and savegames.[13] Official Sony memory cards are only available at a size of 8 MB. Memory cards came in black, satin silver, pink, crimson red, ocean blue and emerald in PAL and NTSC territories, with more exclusive variants in Japan.

Later, Sony partnered with a third-party accessories company Katana to make Memory Cards that came in 16 MB and 32 MB. These Memory Cards were officially licensed products and have the PlayStation 2 logo, and say Magic Gate on them.

Third party memory cards are available up to 128 MB.

The Memory Card (8 MB) is the earliest known commercial product to use ferroelectric RAM (FeRAM). The Memory Card's microcontroller (MCU) contains 32 kb (4 kB) embedded FeRAM manufactured by Toshiba. It was fabricated using a 500 nmcomplementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process.[14]

Multitap[edit]

See also: Multitap

The Multitap for PlayStation 2 allows up to four controllers and four memory cards to be attached to a single controller port and memory card slot.[15] Up to 8 controllers and memory cards may be attached to the console at any one time by using two multitaps simultaneously. Certain Multitaps will not work with specific PS2 models due to slight differences in slot placement. SCPH-10090 was designed to fit the original consoles, while SCPH-70120 was instead designed for the slim consoles.[15]

EyeToy[edit]

Main article: EyeToy

The EyeToy is a digital camera device, similar to a webcam, for the PlayStation 2. Originally, EyeToys were manufactured by Logitech (known as "Logicool" in Japan), while later models were manufactured by Namtai. The EyeToy is mainly used for playing specifically-designed EyeToy games, but can also be used to capture images and videos. It is also compatible with the PlayStation 3.

Headset[edit]

The PS2 headset connects via USB 1.1 on the front of the console. The headset is most commonly used in online multiplayer games; however, it can also be used in some karaoke style games, for voice control, and to enhance the immersive experience of some single player games.[16]

Headphone Splitter[edit]

3.5mm Audio Stereo Y Splitter can transfer audio from PlayStation to 2 output devices including headphones, headset, speakers and more

HDD[edit]

Main article: PlayStation 2 Expansion Bay § Hard disk drive

Network Adapter[edit]

Main article: PlayStation 2 Expansion Bay § Network Adaptor

See also: List of PlayStation 2 network games

The PlayStation 2 network adapter is an optional accessory for some internet multiplayer compatible games. Although the PS2 Slim had one built in, the PS2 fat network adapter needed to be purchased.

Keyboard and Mouse[edit]

An official Sony PlayStation 2 USB keyboard and mouse came bundled as part of Linux for PlayStation 2 which turns any non slim PS2 into a Linux computer. Any standard USB keyboard and mouse will work. In addition to the Linux kit, there were a handful of games that used a keyboard and mouse or just a mouse or trackball.

Vertical Stand[edit]

The Vertical Stand is attached to the PlayStation 2 console to allow it to stand vertically.[17] Three different versions are available: SCPH-10040 for original (large) consoles, SCPH-70110 for slimline SCPH-700xx consoles and SCPH-90110 for slimline SCPH-900xx consoles.

Horizontal Stand[edit]

The horizontal stand is attached to the base of original "fat" PlayStation 2 consoles to add height, and style.[18]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ abc"Logitech Cordless Controller | PlayStation®2 System - PlayStation.com". Us.playstation.com. 2011-11-18. Retrieved 2012-03-27.
  2. ^"Play Sonic in style: Sega bringing the Saturn controller to PS2". Joystiq. 26 February 2005. Retrieved 15 September 2010.
  3. ^ ab"SEGA Saturn Controller Coming to PS2". IGN. 5 May 2005. Archived from the original on March 10, 2012. Retrieved 15 September 2010.
  4. ^"SingStar Microphone Pack - PlayStation 2, PS2 official peripheral". Uk.playstation.com. 2009-07-21. Retrieved 2012-03-27.
  5. ^"Wireless SingStar Microphones - PlayStation 2, PS2 official peripheral". Uk.playstation.com. 2009-07-21. Retrieved 2012-03-27.
  6. ^"Buzz! Buzzers - PlayStation 2, PS2 official peripheral". Uk.playstation.com. 2009-07-21. Retrieved 2012-03-27.
  7. ^"Wireless Buzz! Buzzers - PlayStation 2, PS2 official peripheral". Uk.playstation.com. 2009-07-21. Retrieved 2012-03-27.
  8. ^"RFU Adapter". SCEE. Retrieved 22 November 2010.
  9. ^"AV Adaptor with S Video Out Connector | Accessories | PlayStation®2 Systems - PlayStation.com". Sony. Retrieved 16 September 2010.
  10. ^"Peripherals - Euro-AV Cable". Sony. Retrieved 16 September 2010.
  11. ^"Peripherals - Component AV Cable". Sony. Retrieved 16 September 2010.
  12. ^"Peripherals - Component AV Cable (for PlayStation 2)". Sony. Retrieved 16 September 2010.
  13. ^"Memory Card (8MB) (for PlayStation 2) - PlayStation 2, PS2 official peripheral". Uk.playstation.com. Archived from the original on 2016-03-05. Retrieved 2012-03-27.
  14. ^Scott, J.F. (2003). "Nano-Ferroelectrics". In Tsakalakos, Thomas; Ovid'ko, Ilya A.; Vasudevan, Asuri K. (eds.). Nanostructures: Synthesis, Functional Properties and Application. Springer Science & Business Media. pp. 583-600 (584-5, 597). ISBN .
  15. ^ ab"Multitap (for PlayStation 2)". SCEE. Retrieved 22 November 2010.
  16. ^"Sony PlayStation 2 USB Headset Specs". CNET. Retrieved 16 March 2021.
  17. ^"Vertical Stand (for PlayStation® 2)". SCEE. Retrieved 22 November 2010.
  18. ^"Horizontal Stand (for PlayStation®2)". SCEA. Archived from the original on 2019-12-12. Retrieved 22 November 2010.
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PlayStation_2_accessories

How to Use PlayStation 2 Devices on Your Computer

What do PlayStation 2 controllers, Rock Band guitars, the EyeToy, and the PS2 DVD remote all have in common? They've all been in your closet for gathering dust. However, you can still put these devices to use by connecting them to your computer.

It's understandable that you don't get much use out of your PlayStation 2 anymore. It's now a retro gaming console, with several generations of hardware succeeding it. However, while the console itself may not be of much use, its peripherals can still come in handy.

Use Your PlayStation Controllers With Your PC

Yes, you can use your PlayStation controllers on your PC. No, it's not free.

You're going to need to purchase a PlayStation to USB dongle. Don't panic, though; these are affordable. Google Shopping lists many such devices for under $10, much cheaper than buying a USB joystick for your computer.

If you're wondering how to use your PS2 controller on your PC, all it takes is plugging it in with the adapter. Once you have the device you've got one of the best PC joysticks money can buy.

PlayStation 2 controllers still hold up quite well, and you'll feel right at home using them in a wide variety of games. They work perfectly for playing old-school console games on your computer, or with any game that supports the joystick natively.

Of course, these controllers aren't as well-supported as a PlayStation 4, Xbox 360, or Xbox One controller is on a modern PC. In the case of the Xbox controllers, you'll find them natively supported in most recent PC games, while some support the PS4 controller as well. That said, if you just love the feel of the DualShock 2, it's nice to be able to use it.

Despite PlayStation 2 controllers working well on PC with a dongle, this doesn't work for anything that plugs into a PS2 controller port. For example, you can find multiple reports across the internet of PS2 owners trying to get their arcade sticks working with no success. You might luck out, but don't expect your arcade stick or driving wheel to work without problems.

This may be true for third-party PS2 controllers on PC as well. Some will work while others may not. This is hard to test due to the sheer number of third-party PS2 controllers.

Retrieve Your PS2 Saves From Old Memory Cards

Even if you don't use your old PlayStation 2, you may want access to your save data. Since these saves aren't doing you any good sitting on an old memory card in your closet, you might as well move them from your PS2 to your PC. Whether you're playing your old games on your PC or you simply want to back them up, it can be nice to have them around.

As with using PS2 controllers on PC, this requires a piece of hardware. Unfortunately, this hardware isn't especially cheap. There are a number of different devices you can use but one popular option is the PlayStation 2 Action Replay. At the time of writing this article, this sells for $279, so you would need to be pretty serious about your saved PS2 games to purchase one.

That said, this isn't the only thing this device can do. You can also download completed save files for games, or even manipulated saves that give you a maxed-out character or all the weapons in the game, for example. If you're looking for a way to breathe some life into old PS2 games, this is one way to do it.

Use the PlayStation 2 EyeToy on Your PC

The EyeToy was an early, clunky version of Microsoft's Kinect, and like that device, the EyeToy never really took off. Few games made use of the peripheral, and those that did were clunky and difficult to use. The EyeToy developed a bad reputation straight out of the gate and was quickly forgotten.

Fortunately, you can use the EyeToy as a webcam on your Windows, macOS, or Linux PC. It uses a standard USB port, so you won't need to buy any new hardware in order to get it to work.

If you're using a Linux distribution like Ubuntu, the EyeToy should be supported out of the box. Simply plug it into a free USB port and it should be ready to use. This may differ from distribution to distribution, but with a little searching, you should be able to get it working.

For macOS users, you don't get EyeToy support built into macOS, but getting the EyeToy working is simple. Support comes courtesy of the macam project, which lists the EyeToy as fully supported on its camera support page.

For Windows, things are slightly more up in the air. You can find Windows drivers for the EyeToy from the EyeToy on Computer project. The problem is that this project appears to be gone. While you can still find the drivers to download, there are no instructions on using them.

Even if you do get it working, the EyeToy is pretty dated by modern camera standards. If you're just trying to get it working to say you did or because you don't want to shell out money for a webcam, feel free to try. For a much nicer experience, try taking a look at our guide to the best budget webcams.

Use the PS2 DVD Remote With Your Computer

Part of the reason the PlayStation 2 sold so well is that it doubled as a DVD player. Sony capitalized on this functionality, selling a PS2 DVD remote that let you just the console to watch movies without needing to pick up the controller. If you still have the controller and the dongle that plugged into the PS2, you can easily use them with your PC.

You'll need the same PlayStation 2 to USB dongle that you need to plug in a controller. Simply plug the dongle into the adapter, plug that into your PC, and you'll be able to use the remote with your PC. If your PS2 DVD remote is otherwise going to waste, this is a nice way to make use of it.

We haven't tested this, but the DVD remote might even function as a remote for using Kodi from your couch.

Use Your Old Guitar Hero/Rock Band Guitars

Even if you don't have some plastic instruments lurking somewhere in your closet, the chances are you know someone who does. While the glory days of the Guitar Hero and Rock Band franchises is long gone, that doesn't mean those plastic guitars are useless. For proof, look no further than Frets on Fire.

An open source clone of the Guitar Hero and Rock Band games, Frets on Fire is available for Windows, macOS, and Linux. It supports a wide range of plastic instruments, including your old PS2 plastic guitars. Even better, it can rip songs from Guitar Hero and Guitar Hero 2. All you need to do is insert the game DVDs and let Frets on Fire do the rest.

Using your old PlayStation 2 guitars works just the same as how you use your PS2 controller on PC. Just plug them into the PlayStation 2 to USB adapter and plug that into the computer. Once you've done this, you're ready to rock.

And if you're the hacking type, know that there are many mods out there capable of making Frets on Fire even better. Check them out!

Don't Forget About Your Old PlayStation 2 Games

Yes, the hardware might be dated but there are plenty of great games for the PlayStation 2.

If you have a PlayStation 2 or PlayStation 3, you could pay for them again to play them on your new console, but that's not your only option. You could buy an expensive upscaler like a Framemeister to plug your PS2 into your TV, or you could play those games on your PC.

While the link with video game piracy makes people think that playing games via emulators is illegal, that isn't the case. As long as you actually own the games, you're free to use emulators and ROMs.

If you feel like firing up your old games again with a shiny higher resolution, we have a guide explaining how to play PS2 games on your computer. Now would be a great time to revisit some of the classics, such as the best PlayStation 2 RPGs of all time.

Image Credit: kolidzeitattoo/Depositphotos

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Kris Wouk is a musician, writer, and whatever it's called when someone makes videos for the web. A tech enthusiast for as long as he can remember, he definitely has favorite operating systems and devices, but uses as many others as he can anyway, just to stay caught up.

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Can we play PS2 games on PC without controller?

Can we play PS2 games on PC without controller?

Now that PCSX2 is ready, you can play your PS2 games. Downloading ROMs or ISOs for video games that you do not own is piracy. You can make ISOs from your old PS2 games the same way you might rip a DVD to your computer, but the output file must be an ISO, otherwise it won’t load in PCSX2.

Can I use PC joystick on PS2?

If you still have the controller and the dongle that plugged into the PS2, you can easily use them with your PC. You’ll need the same PlayStation 2 to USB dongle that you need to plug in a controller. Simply plug the dongle into the adapter, plug that into your PC, and you’ll be able to use the remote with your PC.

Can I run my PS2 through my PC?

A PS2 can connect to a laptop/desktop ONLY if your video card allows for s-video/rca/a-v cable/DV IN. (Consult your users manual for the laptop or video card if you have more then 1 s-video port.

Can you connect a PS2 joystick to a PC?

And here you are!, PS2ToJoystick !. The hardware diagram to connect the PS2 connector to the arduino micro. The software to map the PS2 Dualshock 2 gaming pad buttons and axis, to PC Joystick buttons. The STL to 3D print a simple box to enclosure all.

Can you use a PS2 controller on a PC?

Boot PS2 ISO file on PCSX2 and Play any PS2 game using PC Game Controller. You can also set PC Game Controller on PCSX2 each and every button by selecting one by one. Final Step – Apply This Settings and Click on OK button.

Are there any games for Windows with joystick support?

Explore games for Windows with Joystick support on itch.io · Upload your games for Windows with Joystick support to itch.io to have them show up here. New itch.io is now on YouTube! Survive but pay attention to your choices. Their lives are in your hands.

Can you play need for Speed with a joystick?

I’m still incensed that I purchased NFS 2015 only to find out that in 2015 I can’t use a HoTaS or even just Microsoft3D Joystick with throttle without basically breaking every single other game that uses a joystick properly, because of needing to load a third party driver bodge. So basically, I can’t play a DRIVING GAME with a joystick in 2017.

How to configure USB joystick in PS2 emulator?

How To Configure USB Joystick In PS2 Emulator or Redefine Controller In PC Emulators – YouTube This Video Will Guide You That How Can You Set Up Any USB Controller With PS2/PS3 or Any Other Emulator To Play Game With It.

Can you play PS2 games on a PC?

Step 1 – Click on Quick Setup button and then press all buttons on your PC Game Controller (Gamepad). Step 2 – Apply this settings and click on OK button. Final Step – Now you don’t need to do anything. Boot PS2 ISO file on PCSX2 and Play any PS2 game using PC Game Controller.

Do you have to install software on a joystick?

Most of todays peripheral devices are plug and play, which means they will find the drivers automatically when they are attached to a USB port. However, some joysticks or gamepads require you to install the software for them manually. Furthermore, additional software may be needed to configure the button options.

How do you set up a PS2 controller on a PC?

Step 1 – Open PCSX2 (PS2 Emulator). Step 2 – Go to Controllers (PAD), then click on Plugin Settings… Step 3 – Apply this General settings and click on OK button. Step 4 – Click on Pad 1 option. There are only 2 methods to setup PC Game Controller (Gamepad) on PCSX2 (PS2 Emulator).

A PS2 can connect to a laptop/desktop ONLY if your video card allows for s-video/rca/a-v cable/DV IN.

Sours: https://boardgamestips.com/destiny-2/can-we-play-ps2-games-on-pc-without-controller/

How to reset a PS2 controller

Without a controller, your PlayStation 2 console is pretty much useless. The controller is your only means of communication with the console, allowing you to tell the game everything you want it to do. If you notice problems with your PS2 controller, the problem doesn't always warrant a call to Sony support or a replacement. Try to reset the PS2 controller to bring it back to a functional state.

Power off your PlayStation 2 console by holding the front power button until the light turns from green to red.

  • Without a controller, your PlayStation 2 console is pretty much useless.
  • Power off your PlayStation 2 console by holding the front power button until the light turns from green to red.

Disconnect your PlayStation 2 controller from the console and plug it back into the first controller port. Make sure it's plugged in completely.

Lay the controller on the ground with the analogue sticks and buttons facing up. Make sure nothing is touching either analogue stick.

Press the power button on the PS2 to turn it back on.

Use your thumbs to rotate both analogue sticks in a complete circle simultaneously.

Press the analogue button in the centre of the colour to enable or disable the analogue function on the controller. Some games do not allow you to disable this feature, and the light does not turn off. Other games do not support the analogue feature. Refer to the game case or the user manual for information specific to the game in question.

  • Lay the controller on the ground with the analogue sticks and buttons facing up.
  • Press the analogue button in the centre of the colour to enable or disable the analogue function on the controller.

Adjust the controller settings in the game. Many games allow you to reconfigure the controller layout. How and whether this can be done varies from game to game. Refer to the user manual for details specific to the game you're playing.

Many third-party wireless controllers have a small reset button (depressed using a paper clip) or a synchronisation button that resets the controller in one easy step. How this is done varies from brand to brand, so refer to the controller's manual for information.

Try your controller on another PS2 or in the other controller port if it doesn't function even after resetting. If your controller still doesn't function, you may need to contact Sony customer support or buy a replacement.

Sours: https://www.ehow.co.uk/how_6245976_reset-ps2-controller.html

Controller ps2 without

Nikiforov rose to his full height and moved towards Rita, constantly saying. Give it back, it will be better. "The girl was dumbfounded from surprise and confusion, as well as from a strangely sweet feeling caused by a premonition that Vovka would now crawl into the top pocket of.

Her blouse, where for no reason the tubercle of the papilla of her small breast began to appear. Apparently Vovka noticed this too and either looked down or, on the contrary, was delighted.

Without Warning (PS2) - Part 1

Came to me. And we went to the cinema, and you didnt believe me in any way that I didnt remember anything, laughed and thought that. I was kidding you.

Similar news:

My cock will be the last for you this evening, beauty. " He unbuckled his belt, took off his pants and panties and pulled out a cock that looked more like an arm than. A cock. Now you understand why they call me Big John, "baby?" Jackie watched in fear as he attaches his shiny, black head to her wet.



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