Walt disney pictures 2016

Walt disney pictures 2016 DEFAULT

Walt Disney Pictures

Credits

Contents

  • 1Background
  • 21st Logo (October 7, December 25, )
  • 32nd Logo (June 21, December 12, , November 12, )
  • 43rd Logo (April 15, )
  • 54th Logo (Pixar Variant) (November 19, June 29, )
  • 65th Logo (May 19, April 14, )
  • 76th Logo (June 24, )
  • 8Copyright Stamps
  • 9External Links

Background

Walt Disney Pictures is an American film production studio owned by The Walt Disney Company. The studio is the flagship producer of live-action feature films and is based at the Walt Disney Studios in Burbank, California. Animated films produced by Walt Disney Animation Studios and Pixar Animation Studios are also released under the studio banner. Originally reorganized from Walt Disney Productions (now "The Walt Disney Company") as the live-action division of Disney, today it is one of Hollywood's major film studios.

When Walt Disney passed away in December , his brother Roy O. Disney took over Walt Disney Productions and oversaw the release of films such as The Jungle Book, The Happiest Millionaire and Bedknobs and Broomsticks. Roy died from a stroke in , shortly after the opening of Walt Disney World. Walt's son in law Ron Miller began running the studio with the help of Walt and Roy's associates Card Walker and Donn Tatum. This era of leadership at Disney is widely associated with a series of ambitious live action flops such as The Black Hole and Tron, though most of these films have since gained a cult following. Despite Disney's live action struggles, the animation unit continued to have success with films such as Robin Hood. During his tenure, Miller established Touchstone Pictures and rebranded the live-action film division as "Walt Disney Pictures", while Buena Vista was rebranded to "Buena Vista Pictures Distribution" with its opening card being dropped in favor of an in-credit text.

In , a corporate takeover, lead by Walt's nephew Roy E. Disney lead to Michael Eisner and Frank Wells taking over the company. After the failure of The Black Cauldron, Eisner and Wells revived the struggling animation division, now helmed by Roy E. Disney with their new project, The Little Mermaid, which lead to the "Disney Renaissance" through the s. In , Disney began distributing films made by Pixar, buying the company outright by Disney retired the Buena Vista brand on films in , with "Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures" taking its place. In , the film division's name was abbreviated, now referred to simply as "Disney".

1st Logo (October 7, December 25, )

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Nickname: "Walt Dullsney Pictures", "The Walt Disney Text of Boredom", "Boring Disney"

Logo: Just text reading "WALT DISNEY PICTURES", but applied differently depending on the movie.

Variants:

  • Typically, the text (in blue, orange, or white) is against a black background.
  • Return to Oz features the "WALT DiSNEY" script logo in green, on a space-like background.
  • Never Cry Wolf and pre-theatrical versions of Splash have the text in a blue rectangular box with a white outline around it.
  • On Squanto: A Warrior's Tale, the word "presents" fades in below the logo.

FX/SFX: None.

Music/Sounds: The beginning of the movie's theme. On A Far Off Place and The Three Musketeers, it's silent.

Availability: Rare. Seen on some Disney movies from the era. This logo was most often used on live-action films, often to denote more serious, older-skewing fare. Sometimes preceded or plastered by the logo. The logo, however, came back in on trailers. Also seen on The Rocketeer, A Far Off Place, The Three Musketeers, Squanto: A Warrior's Tale (only at the beginning of the film; the next logo appears at the end of the film), Rudyard Kipling's The Jungle Book, and Mighty Joe Young (although the next logo appears on the trailers and TV spots for the said film). Also seen on trailers for White Fang, Shipwrecked, Newsies, Hocus Pocus, Cool Runnings, Iron Will, Angels in the Outfield, Jungle 2 Jungle, Rocketman, and George of the Jungle (though the actual films use the next logo instead).

Editor's Note: This tends to be regarded as overly simple and plain for a Disney logo.

2nd Logo (June 21, December 12, , November 12, )

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Nickname: "The Disney Castle", "Magic Kingdom", "Sleeping Beauty/Cinderella Castle", "Classic Castle", "The Castle of Hollywood", "The Castle of Memories", "The Blue Castle", "Nostalgic Castle", "Walt Disney Castle", "Cel-animated Castle", "The Disney Renaissance Logo", "Disney Script II", "White Disney Script", "2D Castle"

Logo: A shower of light descends from the top of the screen, forming a stylized, segmented Cinderella/Sleeping Beauty castle. The segments seem to be spaced farther apart by the time the light reaches the bottom. Through the main gate of the castle, a white ball of light forms, then extends out to form the words "WALT DiSNEY" in the familiar corporate "Disney" logo font. The word "PICTURES", in a Lubalin Graph-Book font, fades in underneath. A ball of light then appears on the right side of the castle and draws a circular line over it. Three main variants of this are known:

  • The castle is a lavender/white gradient, and the background is indigo. However, some prints of The Black Cauldron show the castle in pure white. Some versions of the variant show the castle in a light blue/white gradient. In this variant, the semi-circular line is drawn all the way to the bottom left. Also, there is a pause after the initial glow before the shower of light descends, and the flash from the castle gate starts immediately after the castle has been formed.
  • The castle is sky blue, and the background is a shady blue gradient. In this variant, the semi-circular line ends just above the "W" from "WALT DiSNEY".
  • Similar to the variant, but the background is solid blue and a seventh flag is added to the right of the castle. This variant is mainly used on DisneyToon Studios' productions.

Trivia:

  • The Disney script font is basically based on Walt Disney's signature.
  • The castle seen in this logo was actually first used by Disneyland in to promote the theme park's 30th anniversary.
  • Although in and , Disney switched its newer animated movies from traditional cel animation to digital ink-and-paint via its CAPS (Computer Animation Production System) software, systems, servers, work servers and desks, this logo was still animated on hand-painted cels until at least the middle of , even though two digitally-animated versions of this logo debuted in and

Variants:

  • The size of the logo may vary.
  • From until , the logo is filmed and made with traditional ink-and-paint cel animation (which means that the logo was painted on several layers of production cels and animated frame by frame), while from until , the logo is videotaped and made with digital ink-and-paint.
  • There is a variation used from until in which the light forming the castle and the curved line's reflection are a little transparent, the flash forming the words "WALT DiSNEY" is a little brighter, and the word "PICTURES" fades in more quickly.
  • There is a variation of this logo where the animation is slow and choppy, and the "shower of light" is not as apparent (it looks more like somebody sliding a sheet of blue paper down to form the castle logo). A smoother version of this variant debuted in
  • When classic Disney shorts were re-released in the s, the text "A FULLY RESTORED ORIGINAL/ANIMATED CLASSIC", in the font used for "PICTURES", is shown before the logo. On The Old Mill, the text reads "A FULLY RESTORED ACADEMY AWARD-WINNING ANIMATED CLASSIC" with a drawing of an Oscar statue to the left and copyright for the A.M.P.A.S. on the bottom.
  • There is a variant in which the flash that forms the "Walt Disney" text is a little slower and is shaped like an oval. This can be found on Dalmatians ( film), the widescreen version of Lady and the Tramp ( WDMC release), and the release of Mary Poppins, plastering the Buena Vista logo.
  • There is a short version that can be seen on Return to Oz, the Roger Rabbit short Tummy Trouble, DuckTales the Movie: Treasure of the Lost Lamp, the Mickey Mouse short Runaway Brain, Treasure Planet, and the 's re-issue of Goofy short Goofy and Wilbur. It also appeared along with the Touchstone Home Video logo on very early Touchstone Home Video releases, mainly Splash, My Science Project, and Baby: Secret of the Lost Legend.
  • On Oliver & Company, the original film release had the version of the castle, while the video release uses the variant.
  • There is an even shorter variant that starts after the "WALT DiSNEY" text is formed. This can be seen in the mids releases of some classic films (such as Bambi and Cinderella, among others), plastering over the RKO and Buena Vista logos. This strangely (albeit, silently) appears on post prints of Lady and the Tramp and the print of The Jungle Book before the Buena Vista logo.
  • There is a variant in which the "WALT DiSNEY" text is in what appears to be "shadow" mode. It is unclear whether this is a result of film deterioration, distortion, or if this was indeed an actual variant.
  • There is a variant in which the logo is a still picture. This can be found at the end of The Hunchback of Notre Dame and on the s re-releases of some ss Disney cartoons (such as Pluto's Fledgling), plastering over the Buena Vista logo.
  • On a few animated films such as Piglet's Big Movie and Leroy & Stitch, "PICTURES" appears with "WALT DiSNEY" instead of fading in after.
  • Depending on the movie, there could be a variant which includes characters or a style from the movie (or an alternate variant of the original version). Click here for a list of these variants.
  • On current prints of the adaptation of Swiss Family Robinson, the version of this logo is in black and white.

Closing Variant: Either the full animation or it will start wherein "WALT DiSNEY" is formed by a flash of light.

FX/SFX: The "glowing castle", the "flash", and the drawing of the line. This was done by the animation department of Walt Disney Productions, which is now known as Walt Disney Animation Studios.

Music/Sounds: A rendition of "When You Wish Upon a Star"; it opens with a chorus singing with a quiet brass rendition of the song's first bar, alongside sparkles evoking pixie dust, followed by an uprising flute and what sounds like a reversed cymbal crash, and then a full orchestral finish of the song's first bar ending with a flute/recorder at the very end. This was arranged by John Debney. Sometimes, it is silent or the opening theme to the movie.

Music/Sounds Variants:

  • There is a slightly re-orchestrated variant on the VHS release of The Black Cauldron.
  • There is a slightly re-orchestrated theme with a choir mixed in for the short variant. Some late s theatrical trailers have a voice-over saying "From the name that means magic in entertainment".
  • On some s theatrical trailers, a different majestic fanfare, which is not a rendition of the logo's usual theme in any form, is heard.
  • The theme is re-orchestrated in a dramatically different key on 's White Fang 2: Myth of the White Wolf. This version was also arranged by John Debney.
  • Some films, such as Recess: School's Out, Jungle 2 Jungle, and The Princess Diaries, use a more dramatic re-orchestration.
  • In short Runaway Brain, the logo's theme is re-orchestrated and sounds more like the Walt Disney Television logo.
  • At the end of D3: The Mighty Ducks, it uses a flash sound and then a laser sound.
  • At the end of movies, this logo is usually silent or has the ending theme of the movie playing over it.
  • Some films, such as Flight of the Navigator, The Rescuers Down Under, as well as the VHS of The Little Mermaid, have the music off-sync with the logo's animation.
  • On re-releases of Disney animated shorts in the s, the logo is silent until the end, when the s Buena Vista music pops up before the cartoon starts.
  • In some films, the film's opening score incorporates the first few bars of "When You Wish Upon a Star" when the logo appears.
  • On one print of Old Yeller, due to a plastering mistake, we hear the film's custom Buena Vista fanfare playing over at the end of the logo.
  • In some films, such as The Emperor's New Groove, Mulan, Pocahontas, and The Hunchback of Notre Dame, the opening theme of the movie is heard.
  • On The Santa Clause 2, the rendition is heard without the flute/recorder.
  • On the DVD of The Rescuers, a thunderclap is heard at the end of the logo, (this is because the movie originally had the Buena Vista logo at the start, with the thunderclap playing over it), on the VHS of said film, however, the logo is silent.
  • The logo's music was heard in a scene of Dalmatians, which was taken from the VHS version of Lady & The Tramp.
  • On The Lion King, we hear ambient noises of the African savannah.
  • At the end of Hercules, we hear Hades (voiced by James Woods) talking over the logo ("What am I, an echo or something? Hello? Hello?! Am I talking to, what, hyperspace? Hello, it's me. Nobody listens."). This was removed in some foreign prints of the movie.
  • On the Brazilian VHS of "Sleeping Beauty", the first part of the logo is silent. The second half of the logo, along with the film's variation of the Buena Vista logo, had the Walt Disney music play.

Availability: Uncommon. Back in the day, it was a lot more common, as it was used for 21 years. Since the logo retired, it has become rarer as many recent prints (both TV and home media) have plastered this with the logo, though it is still intact on older home media, with multiple films on Disney+ having the logo also intact.

  • The first film to use this logo (albeit the short version) was Return to Oz, and this logo has been put in front of almost every subsequent Disney film until the logo's retirement on current releases in late The first animated film to use this logo (as well as the first film to use the full version of the logo) was The Black Cauldron.
  • The "filmed" version of this logo was first seen on a trailer for The Little Mermaid and made its final appearance on a trailer for Chicken Little.
  • Starting in the late 's, it was also used on newer prints of classic films, such as Cinderella (starting in ), Peter Pan (starting in ), Fantasia (starting in ), Dalmatians (starting in ), Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (starting in ), The Fox and the Hound, Pinocchio, Sleeping Beauty (all starting in , in Pinocchio's case, only outside the USA and Canada.), The Aristocats (starting in ), Bambi, Mary Poppins, Fun and Fancy Free, Old Yeller, The Jungle Book (all starting in ), Lady and the Tramp (starting in ), The Rescuers (starting in ), Alice in Wonderland (starting in ) and Bedknobs and Broomsticks (starting in ), among others.
  • The "videotaped" version first appeared (full version) on The Lion King, released on June 15, , and made its final theatrical appearance at the end of The Wild, released on April 14,
  • The short version of the "videotaped" version was first seen on the Mickey Mouse short Runaway Brain, released on August 11,
  • The version was first seen on Atlantis: The Lost Empire, released in June 15, (though using a variant at both the beginning and end of the movie).

The normal variant debuted at the end of the movie Peter Pan: Return of Neverland, released on February 26, (it was also the first Disney direct-to-video movie to use this logo), and made its final appearance on The Fox and the Hound 2 (which as a whole the last film use this logo), released on December 12,

  • The last theatrically-released films to use this logo was The Shaggy Dog (the remake starring Tim Allen), released on March 10, , and at the end of The Wild (the 9th logo is seen at the beginning), released on April 14,
  • The last direct-to-video releases to use this was Bambi II, Brother Bear 2, and The Fox and the Hound 2.
  • It was seen on trailers for Toy Story as well, but the film itself uses the 7th logo.
  • The current Blu-ray/DVD release of The Great Mouse Detective uses the variant of this logo, replacing the and logos.
  • It also appeared on pre prints of The Lion King, as the IMAX version uses the 8th logo (the original VHS of The Lion King preserves this logo, however).
  • Also, even though most recent prints of classic films use the 9th logo, it is strangely seen on the release of The Aristocats, the Diamond Edition DVD of Lady and the Tramp and the Bambi: The Story Behind the Story feature on the DE DVD of Bambi (with the RKO Pictures custom logo theme playing underneath). However, some airings (an example of it being the ones on HBO Asia) of some pre movies still use this logo up to now.
  • It's also preserved on TV airings, DVD/Blu-ray/digital releases, and theatrical reissues of Hocus Pocus. VHS and earlier DVD releases keep this logo intact.
  • This does not appear on movies from Studio Ghibli, as it only has the aforementioned company's logo and during this logo's usage Disney used the Buena Vista name on home video releases of Ghibli movies.
  • The logo also appears on some foreign Blu-Ray releases of Flight of the Navigator, including a German release from Splendid Entertainment and the and releases from Second Sight Films, which presumably use American prints as Disney doesn't hold the video rights overseas.
  • The restored version of this logo was seen on the re-issue of the Netflix print of Hercules, while the other prints uses the 9th logo.
  • When the Disney+ streaming service launched, the version made a surprise appearance preceding the RKO logo on current prints of the adaptation of Swiss Family Robinson, which Walt Disney acquired around the time he produced his own, more well-known adaptation.

Editor's Note: Easily one of the most beloved logos out there, due to its longevity and appearing at the front of a myriad of classic films. On a side note, The Little Mermaid 2 actually used the newer castle on prints. The original release saw the castle.

3rd Logo (April 15, )

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Nicknames: "Disney Script III", "Animated Script"

Logo: On a black/cadet blue gradient background, the regular "WALT DiSNEY" script, in a textured baby blue hue, writes itself onscreen (a la the Walt Disney Home Video logo). The word "P I C T U R E S" fades in below the script in a Times font, with each of the letters spaced-out. A dot of light appears below the script and extends to form a line between the script and text.

FX/SFX: Typical animation for the time period, although smooth.

Music/Sounds: None.

Availability: Ultra rare. Only known to appear at the end of Return to Snowy River, which was originally titled The Man from Snowy River II (the 2nd logo appears at the beginning). Also seen on a TV spot for said film.

Editor's Note: Quite an oddity in general, given its usage and obscurity.

4th Logo (Pixar Variant) (November 19, June 29, )

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Nicknames: "The Pixar Castle", "Pixar Kingdom", "Sleeping Beauty/Cinderella Castle III", "Sleeping Beauty Castle 3D", "CGI Disney Castle", "The Disney Castle II", "Walt Disney Castle II", "The Castle of Hollywood II", "Majestic Castle", "The Zooming Castle", "Pre-Ultra Majestic Castle", "Disney Script IV", "White Disney Script II", "CGI Disney Script", "The Bicolored Castle"

Logo: On a blue background, the camera flies out underneath a CGI castle (in silver and light blue), with flags flapping on the top. When the logo zooms out, the logo proceeds as normal, but the "WALT DiSNEY" text is more three-dimensional, and the ball of light drawing the line over the castle drops what seems to be pixie dust, which is much slower than the 5th logo.

Trivia: This is pretty much a CGI remake of the 5th logo, although the way the castle appears is much different.

Variants:

  • On Toy Story, the logo zooms out to reveal Andy's room once the ball of light finishes drawing the line over the castle.
  • On trailers and on Monsters, Inc., the logo is shortened to when the arc is formed over the castle. Don't expect to find this as a closing variant, though.

Closing Variant: The full animation as transcribed above.

FX/SFX: The camera zooming out and the animation from the 5th logo. Very nice CGI from Pixar themselves.

Music/Sounds: A bombastic/majestic fanfare composed by Randy Newman.

Music/Sounds Variants:

  • On the Toy Story variant, a more bombastic version of the fanfare is used, and once the line finishes being drawn over the castle by the ball of light, only the rest of the notes to the third to last note of the fanfare play, with the last two notes played on a trumpet.
  • The opening theme of the movie was used on Monsters, Inc. as well as films directed by Brad Bird (The Incredibles and Ratatouille).
  • On Cars, the fanfare was re-orchestrated to put a little more of the logo in at the same duration of the logo's closing re-appearance.
  • At the end of the movie, we hear flapping flags and the sound of pixie dust as the ball of light draws the line over the castle. Sometimes, the closing theme would be used instead.

Availability: Fairly common, but it was more common during its usage. It was used on all Pixar movies beginning with Toy Story (which was also the first ever feature-length CGI film) and made its final appearance on Ratatouille. Since the logo was retired, it has become rarer, mostly being plastered by the 9th logo on Blu-Ray and DVD prints, as well as most TV airings of the first two Toy Story films, Monsters, Inc., Finding Nemo, and Cars though it is still intact on current prints of A Bug's Life, The Incredibles, and the aforementioned Ratatouille, as well as pres VHS and DVD releases. The logo was last used in the teaser trailer for WALL-E, since the normal film itself uses the 9th logo. It can also be seen on various shorts based off Pixar films such as Mike's New Car, Jack Jack Attack, Mater and the Ghostlight, and Your Friend the Rat. This logo also made a surprise appearance on an Amazon Instant Video print of Monsters, Inc., likely because it was using the Blu-ray master.

Editor's Note: A nice CGI update of the 2nd logo, which is fondly regarded by fans of older Pixar films.

5th Logo (May 19, April 14, )

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Nicknames: "Hidden Disney Castle", "The Flare", "Sleeping Beauty/Cinderella Castle III", "The Castle of Hollywood III", "The Flashlight", "Golden Disney Castle", "Walt Disney Castle III", "2D Castle II" "Disney Script V", "Golden Disney Script", "Golden Castle"

Logo: On a black background, we see the orange text "WALT DiSNEY PICTURES" wiping in from left to right. Then we see an orange light/flare shining on the logo, illuminating it with a trail effect that rises from the top of the letters "E" and "Y" in "DiSNEY", making its way around to reveal the castle in metallic orange. The entire logo wipes away as soon as the light trail effect illuminates away.

Variant: On trailers, the logo appears to be in a bronze-like color.

Closing Variant: The closing variation of this logo is still. Also, the castle is in a gradient scheme, albeit different from the trailer version. On some movies such as Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl, Brother Bear, and the / releases of The Lion King (), the full animation is being used as a closing variant.

FX/SFX: The text wiping in, the light effect, and the logo wiping out. The effects used are rather unique for their time.

Music/Sounds: None or the opening theme of the movie. On Holes, we hear the sound of a fire being lit when the arc draws.

Availability: Fairly common. Seen on most live-action Disney films from the era, such as Dalmatians, Sky High, National Treasure, Holes, Glory Road, The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, Disney's The Kid, The Rookie, The Pacifier, Tuck Everlasting, and Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl. Also seen on some animated films from Disney, such as Dinosaur (which was the first film to use this logo), Brother Bear (the 6th logo is used at the end on current prints though), and the IMAX re-release and 2-Disc DVD release of The Lion King (). However, most recent prints plaster it with the next logo; as before, however, the logo is intact on VHS and DVD releases of these films. This logo made its final appearance on the animated film The Wild (only at the beginning, the ending of the film uses the 2nd logo).

Editor's Note: A stylish and well-done adaption of the original Disney castle logo for older-skewing films.

6th Logo (June 24, )

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Nicknames: "CGI Magic Kingdom", "The Disney Castle IV", "Sleeping Beauty/Cinderella Castle IV", "Majestic Castle II", "Ultra Majestic Castle", "The Happiest Place on Earth", "The Castle of Hollywood IV", "The Zooming Castle II", "The Castle and the Fireworks", "CGI Disney Castle II", "Sleeping Beauty Castle 3D II", "Walt Disney Castle IV", "Plastering Castle", "Disney Script VI", "Glossy Disney Script"

Logo: We fade into a view of a night sky, with a star somewhere on the screen and the clouds on the bottom. We then start flying down through the clouds with the camera. We then pan with the camera down to a very clear view of a river, with a train running down a railroad track and some buildings nearby. We then fly with the camera past a flag with the Disney coat of arms, and pan down as we see some fireworks going off, only to find the castle completely redone in CGI. The fireworks are almost finished when we almost reach a comfortable position in front of the castle. When the fireworks finish, a very small dot (you will have to look closely if you want to see it) appears way closer to the castle and then moves to the right side. The dot then draws a line over the castle as we are slightly panning, and it is almost finished when we are in a comfortable position in front of the castle. When the dot is finished drawing the line, "WALT DiSNEY", in its well-known script (although it is slightly different to the font), fades in front of the main gate of the castle. When it does, "P I C T U R E S" fades in below the script.

Later Variant: Only the word "DiSNEY" is shown. Even though this was actually first used for the Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment logo back in , it would later replace the previous variant with the full company name on the studio's films, starting with The Muppets. The change was also made to fit into mobile phones and other devices, like the iPod.

Trivia: This logo was produced using the Renderman and Nuke softwares and took nearly a year to fully complete. The main staff responsible for the rendering were Cyrese Parrish and Cameron Smith.

Variants:

  • On 3D releases, the "WALT DiSNEY" (or, in later years, "DiSNEY") text zooms in more to create a 3D illusion. This variant was also used on 2D films, despite them not being released in 3D. You can find this variant on the following films: Mars Needs Moms, Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides, Planes, Planes: Fire and Rescue, Cinderella (), Aladdin (), Maleficent: Mistress of Evil, and the Disney+ original film Noelle.
  • For Walt Disney Animation Studios films between to (including 3D re-release of The Lion King () and Beauty and the Beast ()), the logo is much brighter and tinted purple.
  • Another variant has the "WALT DiSNEY" (or in later years, "DiSNEY") text already formed while the curved line is drawn. This is mostly seen on trailers.
  • On Disney Blu-ray releases, the word "DiSNEY" is absent from the logo. This is only seen as a loading screen when the Blu-ray starts.
  • An open matte version exists. A variant was seen on the DVD of Dalmatians (current home media prints since the s and the Disney+ print omits it), and a full open matte version was seen on Weta Digital's video of the Enchanted opening titles and might be seen on HDTV prints thereof.
  • On current prints of Cars, ABC prints of Toy Story 3 and Freeform prints of Finding Dory, the logo starts with the flag being revealed.

Closing Variants:

  • Just the last few seconds of the logo, where the line draws over the castle and the text fades in. This was also used as the opening logo on current prints of Monsters, Inc. to plaster the logo.
  • On animated movies starting with Finding Dory (with the exceptions of Ralph Breaks the Internet and Onward), the entire logo is used as a closing logo, very possibly to make the international dubbing credits go along with the music playing in the logo. This is even more evident by the fact that the international prints of these movies have the short closing variant right after the dubbing credits, with the syncing of the music intact.
  • On current prints of Aladdin (), Hercules, and Brother Bear (despite the 2nd logo being used at the beginning), the tail end animation of the logo plays.

FX/SFX: The camera flying and panning down to reveal the castle. Beautiful, mind-blowing CGI animation done by Weta Digital (with a collaboration from yU+co).

Music/Sounds: A piano/string piece which builds into an orchestral and choir rendition of "When You Wish Upon a Star" composed by Mark Mancina, which is completely different from the 2nd logo. Firecracker sound effects are heard when the fireworks go off. An alternate version, used since post-November , is subtly different, having louder and clearer sound effects. In most cases (such as John Carter, Planes, Frozen, Moana, Raya and the Last Dragon, Inside Out, Onward, and Luca), the opening theme of the movie is used instead.

Music/Sounds Variants:

  • In some cases, the logo is silent.
  • On Jonas Brothers: The 3D Concert Experience, a vaguely rock-sounding remix of the theme is used, albeit only halfway through when the highest spire is revealed.
  • On Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides, as the opening theme plays, we only hear the sounds of the fireworks and water flowing.
  • The closing variant is mostly silent, but sometimes, the closing theme of the movie will be heard over the logo, or, very rarely, the same fanfare used to open up films. On some films (such as The Princess and the Frog, Frozen and some pre Pixar films), we hear the sound of fairy dust over the logo.
  • At the end of current prints of Aladdin () and Hercules, Genie gives an extra goodbye for the former, and Hades gives an extra talk about his achievement for the latter, both over the logos.
  • At the end of Up, it has the sound of a record popping.
  • On Prom, the fanfare abruptly changes into a rock version near the end when the castle transforms.
  • On Coco, the fanfare is played by a mariachi band, with guitar, trumpets, bongos, violins, voices, and a xylophone, and the firework sounds are removed.
  • On Incredibles 2, a completely different fanfare, composed by Michael Giacchino, plays over this and the following Pixar logo.
  • On The Nutcracker and the Four Realms, a more dramatic rearrangement fanfare plays over the logo.
  • On Lady and the Tramp (), a 50s style jazzy rendition of the fanfare plays over it.
  • On Safety, when the highest spire is revealed, snare drums and extra trumpet sounds are added to accompany it, depicting it was played by a marching band.
  • On Soul, the firework sounds are removed again, and the fanfare is played in a somewhat off-key jazz rendition by Joe's band class, with a drum into, noisy trumpets, squalling saxophones, and a tailgate trombone.

Availability: Ultra common.

  • Seen on all Disney films since Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest (the 5th logo is shown on the trailer instead though).
  • It's also seen on all Pixar films starting with WALL-E.
  • The version with the full company name was last used theatrically on Winnie the Pooh (), and on the DTV film Treasure Buddies (), but it later made a surprise appearance at the end of The Lone Ranger (; theatrical release only).
  • It also started to appear on current prints of classic Disney films, shorts and pre Pixar films in the late s, such as Sleeping Beauty () and Dalmatians (; both starting in ; the latter shows the logo at the start of the film, but both the current home media prints and the Disney+ print omits it), the first two Toy Story films, Pinocchio (), Dumbo (), and Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs () (all starting in ), Beauty and the Beast (; starting in ), Bambi (), Alice in Wonderland (), and The Lion King (; all starting in ; also on the first title, it plastered over the original RKO logo at the start until ), Finding Nemo () and Cinderella (; starting in , but some post prints of the latter, like the Disney+ print, use the 5th logo instead), Monsters, Inc., Aladdin (), Peter Pan (), and The Little Mermaid (; all starting in ), Hercules (; the Netflix print uses the 6th logo), The Jungle Book (; starting in ), and Cars (; starting in ), though others like Hocus Pocus, A Bug's Life, Tarzan, The Incredibles, and Ratatouille still use their old logos. It even plasters the Touchstone Pictures logo on post prints of The Nightmare Before Christmas (although Touchstone is still listed in the closing credits).
  • Seen also on some Indian films produced by this company like Khoobsurat.
  • It also appears preceding the Studio Ghibli logo on the DVD releases of their output, such as Ponyo, and is even surprisingly retained at the end of the UK DVD release of said film, even though Optimum Releasing distributed the film there.
  • It also appeared once on the /?? demo VHS release of Cinderella III: A Twist in Time.
  • The logo usually appeared in ABC shows and specials, such as Dancing with the Stars and American Idol during Disney Night, which occurred once each season, with a variant created for these shows, respectively. In Season 20 of Dancing with the Stars, the background was shown on the video walls in the stage and the logo precedes the BBC Worldwide Productions logo.
  • The logo made an appearance in Disney Infinity (), in which it was entirely recreated using the game's engine, although using a variant. the castle (Cinderella's Castle) and skybox (Disney Castle Twilight) are similar to the logo itself, when at night.

Editor's Note: This logo is easily one of the best ever made, with its lush music, dream-like animation, nice sound effects, and CGI that still looks fantastic over 15 years later. However, it has gained some infamy among some for its continual plastering of Disney's previous logos as well as its symbolism for the company's sheer size and force over the industry (for better or for worse). Nonetheless, this is still a favorite of many.

Copyright Stamps

Here is some information about the copyright stamps on the Disney films:

  • Copyright © by Walter E. Disney
  • Copyright © by Walt Disney Productions, Ltd.
  • September 17, Copyright © by Walt Disney Productions
  • July 2, March 8, Copyright © by The Walt Disney Company
  • April 12, present: Copyright © by Disney Enterprises, Inc.
  • November 25, present: Copyright © by Disney Enterprises, Inc./Pixar Animation Studios (on Pixar films).

External Links

Sours: https://closinglogosgroup.miraheze.org/wiki/Walt_Disney_Pictures

From Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs to our latest box-office smashes, here&#;s a complete list of Disney films. Click here find out more about all things Disney-from A to Z.

Snow White
1.  Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (G)
2.  Pinocchio (G)
3.  Fantasia (G)
4.  The Reluctant Dragon
5.  Dumbo (G)
6.  Bambi (G)
7.  Saludos Amigos
8.  Victory Through Air Power
9.  The Three Caballeros (G)
 Make Mine Music
 Song of the South (G)
 Fun and Fancy Free
 Melody Time
 So Dear to My Heart (G)
 The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad (G)
 Cinderella (G)
 Treasure Island (PG)
 Alice in Wonderland (G)
 The Story of Robin Hood and His Merrie Men (PG)
 Peter Pan (G)
 The Sword and the Rose (PG)
 The Living Desert
 Rob Roy, the Highland Rogue
 The Vanishing Prairie
 20, Leagues Under the Sea (G)
 Davy Crockett, King of the Wild Frontier (PG)
 Lady and the Tramp (G)
 The African Lion
 The Littlest Outlaw
 The Great Locomotive Chase
 Davy Crockett and the River Pirates
 Secrets of Life
 Westward Ho the Wagons!
 Johnny Tremain
 Perri (G)
 Old Yeller (G)
 The Light in the Forest
 White Wilderness
 Tonka
 Sleeping Beauty (G)
 The Shaggy Dog (G)
 Darby O’Gill and the Little People (G)
 Third Man on the Mountain (G)
 Toby Tyler, or Ten Weeks with a Circus (G)
 Kidnapped
 Pollyanna (G)
 The Sign of Zorro
 Jungle Cat
 Ten Who Dared

Swiss Family Robinson
 Swiss Family Robinson (G)
 One Hundred and One Dalmatians (G)
 The Absent-Minded Professor (G)
 The Parent Trap
 Nikki, Wild Dog of the North (G)
 Greyfriars Bobby
 Babes in Toyland
 Moon Pilot
 Bon Voyage
 Big Red
 Almost Angels
 The Legend of Lobo (G)
 In Search of the Castaways (G)
 Son of Flubber (G)
 Miracle of the White Stallions
 Savage Sam
 Summer Magic
 The Incredible Journey (G)
 The Sword in the Stone (G)
 The Three Lives of Thomasina (PG)
 The Misadventures of Merlin Jones (G)
 A Tiger Walks
 The Moon-Spinners (PG)
 Mary Poppins (G)
 Emil and the Detectives
 Those Calloways (PG)
 The Monkey’s Uncle
 That Darn Cat! (G)
 The Ugly Dachshund
 Lt. Robin Crusoe U.S.N.(G)
 The Fighting Prince of Donegal
 Follow Me, Boys! (G)
 Monkeys, Go Home!
 The Adventures of Bullwhip Griffin
 The Happiest Millionaire (G)
 The Gnome-Mobile (G)
 The Jungle Book (G)
 Charlie, The Lonesome Cougar
 Blackbeard’s Ghost (G)
 The One and Only, Genuine, Original Family Band
 Never a Dull Moment (G)
 The Horse in the Gray Flannel Suit
 The Love Bug (G)
 Smith!
 Rascal
 The Computer Wore Tennis Shoes
 King of the Grizzlies (G)
 The Boatniks (G)

The Aristocats
 The Aristocats (G)
 The Wild Country (G)
 The Barefoot Executive (G)
 Scandalous John (G)
 The $1,, Duck (G)
 Bedknobs and Broomsticks (G)
 The Biscuit Eater (G)
 Napoleon and Samantha (G)
 Now You See Him, Now You Don’t (G)
 Run, Cougar, Run (G)
 Snowball Express (G)
 The World’s Greatest Athlete (G)
 Charley and the Angel (G)
 One Little Indian (G)
 Robin Hood (G)
 Superdad (G)
 Herbie Rides Again (G)
 The Bears and I (G)
 The Castaway Cowboy (G)
 The Island at the Top of the World (G)
 The Strongest Man in the World (G)
 Escape to Witch Mountain (G)
 The Apple Dumpling Gang (G)
 One of Our Dinosaurs is Missing (G)
 The Best of Walt Disney’s True-Life Adventures (G)
 Ride a Wild Pony (G)
 No Deposit, No Return (G)
 Gus (G)
 Treasure of Matecumbe (G)
 The Shaggy D.A. (G)
Freaky Friday (G)
 The Littlest Horse Thieves (G)
 The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh (G)
 The Rescuers (G)
 Herbie Goes to Monte Carlo (G)
 Pete’s Dragon (G)
 Candleshoe (G)
 Return from Witch Mountain (G)
 The Cat from Outer Space (G)
 Hot Lead and Cold Feet (G)
 The North Avenue Irregulars (G)
 The Apple Dumpling Gang Rides Again (G)
 Unidentified Flying Oddball (G)
 The Black Hole (PG)
 Midnight Madness (PG)
 The Last Flight of Noah’s Ark (G)
 Herbie Goes Bananas (G)
 The Devil and Max Devlin (PG)
 Amy (G)
 The Fox and the Hound (G)
 Condorman (PG)
 The Watcher in the Woods (PG)
 Night Crossing (PG)

Tron
 Tron (PG)
 Tex (PG)
 Trenchcoat (PG)
 Something Wicked This Way Comes (PG)
 Never Cry Wolf (PG)
 Splash (Touchstone) (PG)
 Tiger Town (G)
 Country (Touchstone) (PG)
 Baby&#;Secret of the Lost Legend(Touchstone) (PG)
 Return to Oz (PG)
 The Black Cauldron (PG)
 My Science Project (Touchstone) (PG)
 The Journey of Natty Gann (PG)
 One Magic Christmas (G)
 Down and Out in Beverly Hills (Touchstone) (R)
 Off Beat (Touchstone) (R)
 Ruthless People (Touchstone) (R)
 The Great Mouse Detective (G)
 Flight of the Navigator (PG)
 Tough Guys (Touchstone) (PG)
 The Color of Money (Touchstone) (R)
 Outrageous Fortune (Touchstone) (R)
 Tin Men (Touchstone) (R)
 Ernest Goes to Camp (Touchstone) (PG)
 Benji the Hunted (G)
 Adventures in Babysitting (Touchstone) (PG)
 Stakeout (Touchstone) (R)
 Can’t Buy Me Love (Touchstone) (PG)
 Hello Again (Touchstone) (PG)
 Three Men and a Baby (Touchstone) (PG)
 Good Morning, Vietnam (Touchstone) (R)
 Shoot to Kill (Touchstone) (R)
 D.O.A. (Touchstone) (R)
 Return to Snowy River (PG)
 Big Business (Touchstone) (PG)
 Who Framed Roger Rabbit (Touchstone) (PG)
 Cocktail (Touchstone) (R)
 The Rescue (Touchstone) (PG)
 Heartbreak Hotel (Touchstone) (PG)
 The Good Mother (Touchstone) (R)
 Ernest Saves Christmas (Touchstone) (PG)
 Oliver & Company (G)
 Beaches (Touchstone) (PG)
 Three Fugitives (Touchstone) (PG)
 New York Stories (Touchstone) (PG)
 Disorganized Crime (Touchstone) (R)
 Dead Poets Society (Touchstone) (PG)
 Honey, I Shrunk the Kids (PG)
 Turner & Hooch (Touchstone) (PG)
 Cheetah (G)
 An Innocent Man (Touchstone) (R)
 Gross Anatomy (Touchstone) (PG)

The Little Mermaid
 The Little Mermaid (G)
 Blaze (Touchstone) (R)
 Stella (Touchstone) (PG)
 Where the Heart Is (Touchstone) (R)
 Pretty Woman (Touchstone) (R)
 Ernest Goes to Jail (Touchstone) (PG)
 Spaced Invaders (Touchstone) (PG)
 Fire Birds (Touchstone) (PG)
 Dick Tracy (Touchstone) (PG)
 Betsy’s Wedding (Touchstone) (R)
 Arachnophobia (Hollywood Pictures) (PG)
 Ducktales: the Movie, Treasure of the Lost Lamp (Disney Movietoons) (G)
 Taking Care of Business (Hollywood Pictures) (R)
 Mr. Destiny (Touchstone) (PG)
 The Rescuers Down Under (G)
 Three Men and a Little Lady (Touchstone) (PG)
 Green Card (Touchstone) (PG)
 White Fang (PG)
 Run (Hollywood Pictures) (R)
 Scenes from a Mall (Touchstone) (R)
 Shipwrecked (PG)
 The Marrying Man (Hollywood Pictures) (R)
 Oscar (Touchstone) (PG)
 One Good Cop (Hollywood Pictures) (R)
 What About Bob? (Touchstone) (PG)
 Wild Hearts Can’t Be Broken (G)
 The Rocketeer (PG)
 The Doctor (Touchstone) (PG)
 V. I. Warshawski (Hollywood Pictures) (R)
 True Identity (Touchstone) (R)
 Paradise (Touchstone) (PG)
 Deceived (Touchstone) (PG)
 Ernest Scared Stupid (Touchstone) (PG)
 Billy Bathgate (Touchstone) (R)
 Beauty and the Beast (G)
 Father of the Bride (Touchstone) (PG)
 The Hand That Rocks the Cradle (Hollywood Pictures) (R)
 Medicine Man (Hollywood Pictures) (PG)
 Blame It On The Bellboy (Hollywood Pictures) (PG)
 Noises Off (Touchstone) (PG)
 Straight Talk (Hollywood Pictures) (PG)
 Newsies (PG)
 Passed Away (Hollywood Pictures) (PG)
 Encino Man (Hollywood Pictures) (PG)
 Sister Act (Touchstone) (PG)
 Honey, I Blew Up the Kid (PG)
 A Stranger Among Us (Hollywood Pictures) (PG)
 3 Ninjas (Touchstone) (PG)
 The Gun in Betty Lou’s Handbag (Touchstone) (PG)
 Crossing the Bridge (Touchstone) (R)
 Sarafina! (Hollywood Pictures) (PG)
 Captain Ron (Touchstone) (PG)

The Mighty Ducks
 The Mighty Ducks (PG)
 Consenting Adults (Hollywood Pictures)(R)
 Aladdin (G)
 The Distinguished Gentleman (Hollywood Pictures)(R)
 The Muppet Christmas Carol (G)
 Alive (Touchstone) (R)
 Aspen Extreme (Hollywood Pictures) (PG)
 The Cemetery Club (Touchstone) (PG)
 Homeward Bound: The Incredible Journey (G)
 Swing Kids (Hollywood Pictures) (PG
 A Far Off Place (PG)
 Born Yesterday (Hollywood Pictures) (PG)
 Adventures of Huck Finn (PG)
 Indian Summer (Touchstone) (PG)
 Bound by Honor (Hollywood Pictures) (R)
 Super Mario Bros. (Hollywood Pictures) (PG)
 Guilty as Sin (Hollywood Pictures) (R)
 Life with Mikey (Touchstone) (PG)
 What’s Love Got to Do with It (Touchstone) (R)
 Son-In-Law (Hollywood Pictures) (PG)
 Hocus Pocus (PG)
 Another Stakeout (Touchstone) (PG)
 My Boyfriend’s Back (Touchstone) (PG)
 Father Hood (Hollywood Pictures) (PG)
 The Joy Luck Club (Hollywood Pictures) (R)
 Money for Nothing (Hollywood Pictures) (R)
 The Program (Touchstone) (R)
 Cool Runnings (PG)
 The Nightmare Before Christmas (Touchstone) (PG)
 The Three Musketeers (PG)
 Sister Act 2: Back in the Habit (Touchstone) (PG)
 Tombstone (Hollywood Pictures) (R)
 Cabin Boy (Touchstone) (PG)
 The Air Up There (Hollywood Pictures) (PG)
 Iron Will (PG)
 My Father the Hero (Touchstone) (PG)
 Blank Check (PG)
 Angie (Hollywood Pictures) (R)
 The Ref (Touchstone) (R)
 D2: The Mighty Ducks (PG)
 Holy Matrimony (Hollywood Pictures) (PG)
 White Fang 2: Myth of the White Wolf (PG)
 The Inkwell (Touchstone) (R)
 When a Man Loves a Woman (Touchstone) (R)
 Renaissance Man (Touchstone) (PG)

The Lion King
 The Lion King (G)
 I Love Trouble (Touchstone) (PG)
 Angels in the Outfield (PG)
 In the Army Now (Hollywood Pictures) (PG)
 Color of Night (Hollywood Pictures) (R)
 It&#;s Pat (Touchstone) (PG)
 Camp Nowhere (Hollywood Pictures) (PG)
 A Simple Twist of Fate (Touchstone) (PG)
 Quiz Show (Hollywood) (PG)
 Terminal Velocity (Hollywood Pictures) (PG)
 Ed Wood (Touchstone) (R)
 Robert A. Heinlein&#;s The Puppet Masters (Hollywood Pictures) (R)
 Squanto: A Warrior&#;s Tale (PG)
 The Santa Clause (PG)
 A Low Down Dirty Shame (Hollywood Pictures) (R)
 Rudyard Kipling&#;s The Jungle Book (PG)
 Houseguest (Hollywood Pictures) (PG)
 Bad Company (Touchstone) (R)
 Miami Rhapsody (Hollywood Pictures) (PG)
 The Jerky Boys (Touchstone) (R)
 Heavyweights (PG)
 Man of the House (PG)
 Roommates (Hollywood Pictures) (PG)
 Tall Tale (PG)
 Funny Bones (Hollywood Pictures) (R)
 Jefferson in Paris (Touchstone) (PG)
 A Goofy Movie (G)
 While You Were Sleeping (Hollywood Pictures) (PG)
 A Pyromaniac&#;s Love Story (Hollywood Pictures) (PG)
 Crimson Tide (Hollywood Pictures) (R)
 Mad Love (Touchstone) (PG)
 Pocahontas (G)
 Judge Dredd (Hollywood Pictures) (R)
 Operation Dumbo Drop (PG)
 Dangerous Minds (Hollywood Pictures) (R)
 A Kid in King Arthur&#;s Court (PG)
 The Tie that Binds (Hollywood Pictures) (R)
 Unstrung Heroes (Hollywood Pictures) (PG)
 The Big Green (PG)
 Dead Presidents (Hollywood Pictures) (R)
 Feast of July (Touchstone) (R)
 The Scarlet Letter (Hollywood Pictures) (R)
 Frank and Ollie (PG)
 Powder (Hollywood Pictures) (PG)

Toy Story
 Toy Story (G)
 Father of the Bride, Part II (Touchstone)(PG)
 Nixon (Hollywood Pictures)(R)
 Tom and Huck (PG)
 Mr. Holland&#;s Opus (Hollywood Pictures)(PG)
 White Squall (Hollywood Pictures)(PG)
 Mr. Wrong (Touchstone)(PG)
 Muppet Treasure Island (G)
 Before and After (Hollywood Pictures)(PG)
 Up Close and Personal (Touchstone)(PG)
 Homeward Bound II: Lost in San Francisco (G)
 Two Much (Touchstone)(PG)
 Little Indian, Big City (Touchstone)(PG)
 James and the Giant Peach (PG)
 Celtic Pride (Hollywood Pictures)(PG)
 Last Dance (Touchstone)(R)
 Boys (Touchstone)(PG)
 Spy Hard (Hollywood Pictures)(PG)
 Eddie (Hollywood Pictures)(PG)
 The Rock (Hollywood Pictures)(R)
 The Hunchback of Notre Dame (G)
 Phenomenon (Touchstone)(PG)
 Kazaam (Touchstone)(PG)
 Jack (Hollywood Pictures)(PG)
 First Kid (PG)
 The Rich Man&#;s Wife (Hollywood Pictures)(R)
 D3: The Mighty Ducks (PG)
 The Associate (Hollywood Pictures)(PG)
 Ransom (Touchstone)(R)
 The War at Home (Touchstone)(R)
  Dalmatians [live action](G)
 The Preacher&#;s Wife (Touchstone)(PG)
 Evita (Hollywood Pictures)(PG)
 Metro (Touchstone)(R)
 Prefontaine (Hollywood Pictures)(PG)
 Shadow Conspiracy (Hollywood Pictures)(R)
 That Darn Cat [remake](PG)
 Jungle 2 Jungle (PG)
 The Sixth Man (Touchstone)(PG)
 Grosse Pointe Blank (Hollywood Pictures)(R)
 Romy and Michele&#;s High School Reunion (Touchstone)(R)
 Gone Fishin&#; (Hollywood Pictures)(PG)
 Con Air (Touchstone)(R)
 Hercules (G)
 George of the Jungle (PG)
 Nothing to Lose (Touchstone)(R)
 Air Bud (PG)
 G.I. Jane (Hollywood Pictures)(R)
 A Thousand Acres (Touchstone)(R))
 Washington Square (Hollywood Pictures)(PG)
 RocketMan (PG)
 Playing God (Touchstone)(R)

Flubber
 Flubber (PG)
 An American Werewolf in Paris (Hollywood Pictures)(R)
 Mr. Magoo (PG)
 Kundun (Touchstone)(PG)
 Deep Rising (Hollywood Pictures)(R)
 Krippendorf’s Tribe (Touchstone)(PG)
 An Alan Smithee Film: Burn, Hollywood, Burn (Hollywood Pictures)(R)
 Meet the Deedles (PG)
 He Got Game (Touchstone)(R)
 The Horse Whisperer (Touchstone)(PG)
 Six Days, Seven Nights (Touchstone)(PG)
 Mulan (G)
 Armageddon (Touchstone)(PG)
 Jane Austen’s Mafia! (Touchstone)(PG)
 The Parent Trap (PG)
 Firelight (Hollywood Pictures)(R)
 Simon Birch (Hollywood Pictures)(PG)
 Holy Man (Touchstone)(PG)
 Beloved (Touchstone)(R)
 The Waterboy (Touchstone)(PG)
 I’ll Be Home for Christmas (PG)
 Enemy of the State (Touchstone)(R)
 A Bug’s Life (G)
 Mighty Joe Young (PG)
 A Civil Action (Touchstone)(PG)
 Rushmore (Touchstone)(R)
 My Favorite Martian (PG)
 The Other Sister (Touchstone)(PG)
 Doug’s 1st Movie (G)
 10 Things I Hate About You (Touchstone)(PG)
 Endurance (G)
 Instinct (Touchstone)(R)
Tarzan (G)
 Summer of Sam (Touchstone)(R)
 Inspector Gadget (PG)
 The Sixth Sense (Hollywood)(PG)
 The 13th Warrior (Touchstone)(R)
 Breakfast of Champions (Hollywood)(R)
 Mumford (Touchstone)(R)
 Mystery Alaska (Hollywood)(R)
 The Hand Behind the Mouse: The Ub Iwerks Story (G)
 The Straight Story (G)
 The Insider (Touchstone)(R)
 Toy Story 2 (G)
 Deuce Bigalow: Male Gigolo (Touchstone)(R)
 Cradle Will Rock (Touchstone)(R)
 Bicentennial Man (Touchstone)(PG)
 Fantasia/ (G)
 Play It to the Bone (Touchstone)(R)
 Gun Shy (Hollywood)(R)
 The Tigger Movie (G)
 Mission to Mars (Touchstone)(PG)
 Whispers (G)
 High Fidelity (Touchstone)(R)
 Keeping the Faith (Touchstone)(PG)

Dinosaur
 Dinosaur (PG)
 Shanghai Noon (Touchstone)(PG)
 Gone in 60 Seconds (Touchstone)(PG)
 Disney’s The Kid (PG)
 Coyote Ugly (Touchstone)(PG)
 The Crew (Touchstone)(PG)
 Duets (Hollywood)(R)
 Remember the Titans (PG)
 Playing Mona Lisa (no label)(R)
 Unbreakable (Touchstone)(PG)
  Dalmatians (G)
 The Emperor’s New Groove (G)
 O Brother, Where Art Thou? (Touchstone)(PG)
 Double Take (Touchstone)(PG)
 Recess: School’s Out (G)
 Just Visiting (Hollywood)(PG)
 Pearl Harbor (Touchstone)(PG)
 Atlantis: The Lost Empire (PG)
 crazy/beautiful (Touchstone)(PG)
 The Princess Diaries (G)
 Bubble Boy (Touchstone)(PG)
 New Port South (Touchstone)(PG)
 Max Keeble’s Big Move (PG)
 Corky Romano (Touchstone)(PG)
 High Heels and Low Lifes (Touchstone)(R)
 Monsters, Inc. (G)
 Out Cold (Touchstone)(PG)
 The Royal Tenenbaums (Touchstone)(R)
 Snow Dogs (PG)
 The Count of Monte Cristo (Touchstone)(PG)
 Return to Never Land (G)
 Sorority Boys (Touchstone)(R)
 The Rookie (G)
 Big Trouble (Touchstone)(PG)
 Frank McKlusky, C.I. (Touchstone)(PG)
 ESPN’s Ultimate X (Touchstone)(PG)
 Bad Company (Touchstone)(PG)
 Lilo & Stitch (PG)
 Reign of Fire (Touchstone)(PG)
 The Country Bears (G)
 Signs (Touchstone)(PG)
 Spirited Away (Walt Disney Studios)(PG)
 Moonlight Mile (Touchstone)(PG)
 Sweet Home Alabama (Touchstone)(PG)
 Tuck Everlasting (PG)
 Santa Clause 2 (G)
 Treasure Planet (PG)
 The Hot Chick (Touchstone)(PG)
 25th Hour (Touchstone)(R)
 The Recruit (Touchstone)(PG)

Shanghai Knights
 Shanghai Knights (Touchstone)(PG)
 The Jungle Book 2 (G)
 Bringing Down the House (Touchstone)(PG)
 Piglet’s Big Movie (G)
 Ghosts of the Abyss (G)
 Holes (PG)
 The Lizzie McGuire Movie (PG)
 Finding Nemo (G)
 Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl (PG)
 Freaky Friday (PG)
 Open Range (Touchstone)(R)
 Hope Springs (Touchstone)(PG)
 Cold Creek Manor (Touchstone)(R)
 Under the Tuscan Sun (Touchstone)(PG)
 Veronica Guerin (Touchstone)(R)
 Brother Bear (G)
 The Haunted Mansion (PG)
 Calendar Girls (Touchstone)(PG)
 The Young Black Stallion (G)
 Teacher’s Pet (PG)
 Miracle (PG)
 Confessions of a Teenage Drama Queen (PG)
 Hidalgo (Touchstone)(PG)
 The Ladykillers (Touchstone)(R)
 Home on the Range (PG)
 The Alamo (Touchstone)(PG)
 Sacred Planet (G)
 Raising Helen (Touchstone)(PG)
 Around the World in 80 Days (PG)
 America’s Heart & Soul (PG)
 King Arthur (Touchstone)(PG)
 The Village (Touchstone)(PG)
 The Princess Diaries 2: Royal Engagement (G)
 Mr. (Touchstone)(PG)
 The Last Shot (Touchstone)(R)
 Ladder 49 (Touchstone)(PG)
 The Incredibles (PG)
 National Treasure (PG)
 The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou (Touchstone)(R)
 Aliens of the Deep (G)
 Pooh’s Heffalump Movie (G)
 The Pacifier (PG)
 Ice Princess (G)
 A Lot Like Love (Touchstone)(PG)
The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy (Touchstone)(PG)
 Howl’s Moving Castle (PG)
 Herbie: Fully Loaded (G)
 Dark Water (Touchstone)(PG)

Sky High
 Sky High (PG)
 Valiant (G)
 Flightplan (Touchstone)
 The Greatest Game Ever Played (PG)
 Shopgirl (Touchstone)(R)
 Chicken Little (G)
 The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (PG)
 Casanova (Touchstone)
 Glory Road (PG)
 Annapolis (Touchstone)(PG)
 Roving Mars (G)
 Eight Below (PG)
 The Shaggy Dog (PG)
 Stay Alive (Hollywood Pictures)(PG)
 The Wild (G)
 Stick It (Touchstone)(PG)
 Goal! The Dream Begins (Touchstone)(PG)
 Cars (G)
 Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest (PG)
 Step Up (Touchstone)(PG)
 Invincible (PG)
 The Guardian (Touchstone)(PG)
 The Prestige (Touchstone)(PG)
 The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause (G)
 Déjà Vu (Touchstone)(PG)
 Apocalypto (Touchstone)(R)
 Primeval (Hollywood Pictures)(R)
 Bridge to Terabithia (PG)
 Wild Hogs (Touchstone)(PG)
 Meet the Robinsons (G)
 The Invisible (Hollywood Pictures)(PG)
 Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End (PG)
 Ratatouille (G)
 The Secret of the Magic Gourd (NR)
 Underdog (PG)
 The Game Plan (PG)
 Dan in Real Life (PG)
 Enchanted (PG)
 National Treasure: Book of Secrets (PG)
 Hannah Montana & Miley Cyrus: Best of Both Worlds Concert (G)
 Step Up 2 the Streets (Touchstone)(PG)
 College Road Trip (G)
 The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian (PG)
 WALL•E (G)
 Swing Vote (Touchstone)(PG)
 Tinker Bell (G)
 Miracle at St. Anna (Touchstone)(R)
 Beverly Hills Chihuahua (PG)
 Morning Light (PG)
 High School Musical 3: Senior Year (G)
 Roadside Romeo (NR)

Bolt
 Bolt (PG)
 Bedtime Stories (PG)
 Confessions of a Shopaholic (Touchstone)(PG)
 Jonas Brothers: The 3D Concert Experience (G)
 Race to Witch Mountain (PG)
 Hannah Montana the Movie (G)
 Earth (Disneynature)(G)
 Trail of the Panda (NR)
 The Boys: The Sherman Brothers’ Story (PG)
 Up (PG)
 The Proposal (Touchstone)(PG)
 G-Force (PG)
 Ponyo (G)
 X-Games 3D: The Movie (PG)
 Walt & El Grupo (PG)
 Surrogates (Touchstone)(PG)
 Tinker Bell and the Lost Treasure (G)
 Kniga Masterov (The Book of Masters) (NR)
 Disney’s A Christmas Carol (PG)
 Old Dogs (PG)
 The Princess and the Frog (G)
 When in Rome (PG)
 Alice in Wonderland (PG)
 Waking Sleeping Beauty (PG)
 The Last Song (Touchstone)(PG)
 Oceans (Disneynature)(G)
 Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time (PG)
 Toy Story 3 (G)
 The Sorcerer’s Apprentice (PG)
 Step Up 3D (Touchstone)(PG)
 Tales from Earthsea (PG)
 The Switch (Miramax)(PG)
 Tinker Bell and the Great Fairy Rescue (G)
 You Again (Touchstone)(PG)
 Secretariat (PG)
 Tangled (PG)
 The Tempest (Touchstone/Miramax)(PG)
 Tron: Legacy (PG)
 Once Upon a Warrior (NR)
 Gnomeo & Juliet (Touchstone)(G)
 I Am Number Four (Touchstone/DreamWorks)(PG)
 Mars Needs Moms (PG)
 African Cats: Kingdom of Courage (Disneynature)(G)
 Zokkomon (NR)
 Prom (PG)
 Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides (PG)
 Cars 2 (G)
 Winnie the Pooh (G)
 The Help (Touchstone/DreamWorks)(PG)
 Fright Night (Touchstone/DreamWorks)(R)
 Real Steel (Touchstone/DreamWorks)(PG)

The Muppets
 The Muppets (PG)
 War Horse (Touchstone/DreamWorks)(PG)
 The Secret World of Arrietty (G)
 John Carter (PG)
 Arjun: The Warrior Prince (NR)
 Chimpanzee (Disneynature)(G)
 Marvel’s The Avengers (Marvel)(PG)
 Brave (PG)
 Mad Buddies (NR)
 People Like Us (Touchstone/DreamWorks)(PG)
 The Odd Life of Timothy Green (PG)
 Secret of the Wings (G)
 Barfi! (NR)
 Frankenweenie (PG)
 Wreck-It Ralph
 Lincoln (Touchstone/DreamWorks)
 Oz the Great and Powerful (PG)
 Wings of Life (Disneynature)(G)
 Iron Man 3 (Marvel) (PG)
 Monsters University (G)
 The Lone Ranger (PG)
 Planes (PG)
 The Fifth Estate (Touchstone/DreamWorks)(R)
 The Wind Rises (Touchstone)(PG)
 Thor: The Dark World (Marvel)(PG)
 Delivery Man (Touchstone/DreamWorks)(PG)
 Frozen(PG)
 Saving Mr. Banks (PG)
 The Pirate Fairy (G)
 Need for Speed (Touchstone/DreamWorks)(PG)
 Muppets Most Wanted (PG)
 Captain America: The Winter Soldier (Marvel)(PG)
 Bears (Disneynature)(G)
 Million Dollar Arm (PG)
 Maleficent (PG)
 Planes: Fire and Rescue (PG)
 Guardians of the Galaxy (Marvel)(PG)
 The Hundred-Foot Journey (Touchstone/DreamWorks)(PG)
 Khoobsurat (NR)
 Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day (PG)
 Big Hero 6 (PG)
 Into The Woods (PG)
 Strange Magic (Touchstone/Lucasfilm)(PG)
 Tinker Bell and the Legend of the NeverBeast (G)
 McFarland, USA (PG)
 Cinderella (PG)
 Monkey Kingdom (Disneynature)(G)
 Avengers: Age of Ultron (Marvel)(PG)
 Tomorrowland (PG)

Inside Out
 Inside Out (PG)
 ABCD2 (NR)
 Ant-Man (Marvel)(PG)
 Bridge of Spies (Touchstone/DreamWorks) (PG)
 The Good Dinosaur (PG)
 Star Wars: The Force Awakens (Lucasfilm) (PG)
The Finest Hours (PG)
Zootopia (PG)
The Jungle Book (PG)
Captain America: Civil War (Marvel) (PG)
Alice Through the Looking Glass (PG)
Finding Dory (PG)
The BFG (PG)
Pete’s Dragon (PG)
The Light Between Oceans (PG)
Queen of Katwe (PG)
Doctor Strange (Marvel) (PG)
 Moana (PG)
Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (Lucasilm)(PG)
Dangal (Disney India)
Beauty and the Beast (PG)
Born in China (Disneynature) (G)
Guardians of the Galaxy, Vol. 2 (Marvel) (PG)
Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales (PG)
Cars 3 (Pixar) (G)
Jagga Jasoos (Disney India)
Thor: Ragnarok (Marvel) (PG)
Coco (Pixar) (PG)
Star Wars: The Last Jedi (Lucasfilm) (PG)
Black Panther (Marvel) (PG)
A Wrinkle in Time (PG)
Avengers: Infinity War (Marvel) (PG)
Solo: A Star Wars Story (Lucasfilm) (PG)
Incredibles 2 (Pixar) (PG)
Ant-Man and The Wasp (Marvel) (PG_13)
Christopher Robin (PG)
The Nutcracker and the Four Realms (PG)
Ralph Breaks the Internet (PG)
Mary Poppins Returns (PG)
Captain Marvel (Marvel) (PG)
Dumbo (PG)
Penguins (Disneynature) (G)
Avengers: Endgame (Marvel) (PG)
Aladdin (PG)
Toy Story 4 (Pixar) (G)
The Lion King(PG)
Elle Fanning as Princess Aurora - 3
 Maleficent: Mistress of Evil(PG)
 Frozen 2 (PG)
Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker(PG)
Onward (Pixar) (PG)

Sours: https://dcom/list-of-disney-films/
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ABOUT THE WALT DISNEY COMPANY

Leadership

Robert A. Iger

Executive Chairman and Chairman of the Board, The Walt Disney Company

Executive Chairman and Chairman of the Board, The Walt Disney Company

Robert A. Iger is Executive Chairman of The Walt Disney Company and Chairman of the Board of Directors. He assumed the role of Executive Chairman in February , having served as Chief Executive Officer since As Executive Chairman, Mr. Iger directs the Company’s creative endeavors, while leading the Board and providing the full benefit of his experience, leadership and guidance.

Over his 15 years leading the Company, Mr. Iger built Disney into one of the world’s largest and most admired media and entertainment companies, while focusing on the three fundamental pillars of his strategic vision: generating the best creative content possible; fostering innovation and utilizing the latest technology; and expanding into new markets around the world.

As CEO, Mr. Iger expanded on Disney’s rich history of unforgettable storytelling with the acquisitions of Pixar (), Marvel (), Lucasfilm () and 21st Century Fox (), as well as the landmark opening of Disney’s first theme park and resort in Mainland China, Shanghai Disney Resort; and the release of a number of record-setting films including Marvel’s Avengers: Endgame, Disney’s Frozen and Frozen 2, and the groundbreaking movie Marvel’s Black Panther. Always one to embrace new technology, Mr. Iger has made Disney an industry leader through its creative content offerings across multiple platforms, most recently leveraging cutting edge direct-to-consumer technology with the highly successful launch of the Disney+ streaming service in November and ESPN+ in

During Mr. Iger’s tenure, The Walt Disney Company has been recognized as one of the “Most Reputable Companies” in both America and the world by Forbes magazine (); one of the “Best Employers” in both America and the world by Forbes magazine ( and , respectively); one of the “World's Most Admired Companies” by Fortune magazine (); and as one of the “World's Most Respected Companies" by Barron’s ().

Mr. Iger assumed the role of Chief Executive Officer of The Walt Disney Company in October, , and was elected Chairman in From he served as President and Chief Operating Officer. Mr. Iger officially joined the Disney senior management team in as Chairman of the Disney-owned ABC Group and in was given the additional responsibility of President, Walt Disney International. In that role, Mr. Iger expanded and coordinated Disney’s presence outside of the United States, establishing the blueprint for the Company’s international growth today. As Chairman of the ABC Group, Mr. Iger oversaw the broadcast television network and station group, cable television properties, and radio and publishing businesses and also guided the complex merger between Capital Cities/ABC, Inc. and The Walt Disney Company. During Mr. Iger’s years with ABC, he obtained hands-on experience in every aspect of the television business—including news, sports, and entertainment—as well as in program acquisition, rights negotiations, and business affairs. He began his career at ABC in

Mr. Iger has been named TIME’s Businessperson of the Year (); one of the “World’s Most Powerful People” by Forbes magazine (); one of the “Top Gun CEOs” by Forbes magazine (); one of Fortune magazine's “25 Most Powerful People in Business” (, ); one of the “Best CEOs” by Institutional Investor magazine (, , , ); MarketWatch CEO of the Year (); and “CEO of the Year” by Chief Executive ().

Mr. Iger was inducted into the Television Academy Hall of Fame in January , and the Broadcasting and Cable Hall of Fame in He serves on the boards of the National September 11 Memorial & Museum, Bloomberg Philanthropies, and Perfect Day; and as chairman of the capital campaign for the new Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Museum in Los Angeles. In , Mr. Iger became a member of the Academy of Arts & Sciences, one of the nation’s most prestigious honorary societies, which recognizes some of the world’s most accomplished scholars, scientists, writers, artists, and civic, corporate, and philanthropic leaders.

Mr. Iger is the author of the New York Times Best Seller "The Ride of a Lifetime: Lessons Learned from 15 Years as CEO of The Walt Disney Company," published in He is a graduate of Ithaca College.

 

Leadership

Bob Chapek

Chief Executive Officer, The Walt Disney Company

Chief Executive Officer, The Walt Disney Company

Bob Chapek is Chief Executive Officer of The Walt Disney Company, one of the world’s largest media and entertainment companies and home to some of the most respected and beloved brands around the globe, including Disney, Pixar, Marvel, Star Wars, ESPN and National Geographic.

Mr. Chapek assumed the role of CEO on February 25, and reports to the Company’s Executive Chairman, Robert A. Iger, and the Board of Directors.

Mr. Chapek’s nearly three decades at Disney have been marked by growth and transformation. A visionary leader, he has championed using creativity and cutting-edge technology to drive expansion and improve the guest and consumer experience, developed and successfully implemented groundbreaking business models, and identified new revenue streams to achieve business objectives and sustain long-term growth.

Before becoming the 7th CEO in Disney’s nearly year history, Mr. Chapek served as Chairman of Disney Parks, Experiences and Products since the segment’s creation in , and prior to that he was Chairman of Walt Disney Parks and Resorts since The Parks, Experiences and Products segment includes Disney’s iconic travel and leisure businesses, which include six resort destinations in the United States, Europe and Asia; a top-rated cruise line; a popular vacation ownership program; and an award-winning guided family adventure business. Disney’s global consumer products operations include the world’s leading licensing business across toys, apparel, home goods, digital games and apps; the world’s largest children’s print publisher; Disney store locations around the world; and the shopDisney e-commerce platform.

During his tenure, Disney Parks saw the largest investment and expansion in its sixty-year history, including the successful opening of Shanghai Disney Resort; nearly doubling the Disney Cruise Line fleet; introducing the most technologically advanced and immersive lands in the parks’ history, Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge at Disneyland Resort and Walt Disney World Resort; the growth of Marvel-inspired attractions across the globe; and one of the most ambitious development projects at Disneyland Paris since the park first opened.

Mr. Chapek’s guest-centric approach focuses on ensuring that every aspect of an experience is uniquely Disney and exceeds guest expectations. At Disney Parks, he implemented innovative strategies to improve the guest experience by balancing demand at the parks, integrating new franchises at locations around the world, and introducing beloved and iconic experiences to new generations of Disney fans. As head of Disney Consumer Products he led a period of transformation in the worlds of play, storytelling, and learning.

Mr. Chapek also served as president of Distribution for The Walt Disney Studios, where he managed the Company's film content distribution strategy across multiple platforms, and later as president of Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment, where he led the organization to record-setting performances and played a key role in the commercialization of the Studio's film business.

Throughout, Mr. Chapek has made enhancing the employee experience a top priority, and he’s driven initiatives and programs related to education, healthcare, childcare, diversity and inclusion, veteran and active duty military appreciation, and workforce development. Mr. Chapek has also developed a close relationship with the Make-A-Wish Foundation, where he currently serves as a Board Member and helps the organization leverage the power of Disney to make a difference in the lives of children with critical illnesses and their families.

Prior to joining the company, Mr. Chapek worked in brand management at H.J. Heinz Company, and in advertising at J. Walter Thompson. He has a degree in microbiology from Indiana University Bloomington, and received his MBA from Michigan State University.

Leadership

Alan Bergman

Chairman, Disney Studios Content

Chairman, Disney Studios Content

As Chairman, Disney Studios Content, Alan Bergman leads The Walt Disney Company’s renowned Studios division, which encompasses a collection of world-class entertainment studios that produce high-quality cinematic storytelling for both theatrical and streaming release. Among these globally respected studios are Disney, Walt Disney Animation Studios, Pixar Animation Studios, Marvel Studios, Lucasfilm, 20th Century Studios, and Searchlight Pictures. It is also home to Disney Theatrical Productions, producer of popular stage shows on Broadway and around the world.

Bergman oversees all facets of Disney Studios’ global output including creative, production, marketing, operations, business affairs, finance, and legal affairs.

Bergman served as Co-Chairman of The Walt Disney Studios from to and as its President from to He played a leading role in the Studios’ integrations of Pixar Animation Studios, Marvel Studios, Lucasfilm, and the Fox film studios and its expansion into the production of content for Disney’s streaming services. During his tenure, The Walt Disney Studios set numerous records at the box office, surpassing $7 billion globally in and and $11 billion in , the only studio ever to have reached these thresholds. Recent successes include Disney’s live-action “Beauty and the Beast,” “Aladdin,” and “The Lion King”; Walt Disney Animation Studios’ “Frozen,” “Zootopia,” and “Frozen 2”; Pixar’s “Coco,” “Incredibles 2,” and “Toy Story 4”; Lucasfilm’s “Star Wars: The Force Awakens,” “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story,” “Star Wars: The Last Jedi,” and “Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker”; and  Marvel Studios’ “Black Panther,” “Captain Marvel,” “Avengers: Infinity War,” and “Avengers: Endgame.”

Bergman joined The Walt Disney Company in as a Director in the corporate controllership group with a focus on Walt Disney Studios initiatives. In , he was promoted to Vice President of the Company’s operations planning group, where he was responsible for developing the Company’s annual operating plan. Bergman was named Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of The Walt Disney Studios in and upped to Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer in He holds a bachelor’s degree in business economics from UCLA.

Bergman is a member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

Leadership

Alan Braverman

Senior Executive Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary, The Walt Disney Company

Senior Executive Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary, The Walt Disney Company

Alan Braverman was named executive vice president and general counsel of The Walt Disney Company in January, Mr. Braverman serves as the chief legal officer of the company and oversees its team of attorneys responsible for all aspects of Disney's legal affairs and government relations around the world.

Previously, Mr. Braverman was executive vice president and general counsel, ABC, Inc. and deputy general counsel, The Walt Disney Company. In that capacity he oversaw the legal affairs of the ABC Broadcast Group, ESPN and Disney/ABC Cable, as well as labor relations. In August , prior to Disney's acquisition of ABC, Inc., Mr. Braverman was named senior vice president and general counsel, ABC, Inc. In October , he was promoted to vice president and general counsel. He joined ABC, Inc. in November , as vice president and deputy general counsel. In his positions with ABC, Inc. Mr. Braverman had broad responsibilities for the operation of the legal department, for government relations and for the Corporation's legal affairs. During his tenure at ABC, Mr. Braverman guided the company through numerous lawsuits regarding news reporting and news gathering practices, supervised the company's labor department, and oversaw the government relations function for Capital Cities/ABC, Inc. prior to its merger with Disney.

Mr. Braverman joined Capital Cities/ABC, Inc. from the Washington, D.C. law firm of Wilmer, Cutler & Pickering, where he started in He became a partner in , specializing in complex commercial and administrative litigation. Before joining Wilmer, Cutler & Pickering, Mr. Braverman was a law clerk to the Honorable Thomas W. Pomeroy, Jr., Justice, Pennsylvania Supreme Court.

In , Mr. Braverman was recognized with the American Bar Association’s Spirit of Excellence Award for his efforts and accomplishments in promoting a more racially and ethnically diverse legal profession. He serves on the board of the Leadership Council on Legal Diversity, as well as the Emeritus Board of the Constitutional Rights Foundation.

A native of Boston, Mr. Braverman received a B.A. degree from Brandeis University in and subsequently worked for two years as a Vista volunteer in Gary, Indiana. In , he received a J.D. degree summa cum laude from Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, where he was also editor-in-chief of the Law Review.

Leadership

Rebecca Campbell

Chairman, International Operations and Direct-to-Consumer, The Walt Disney Company

Chairman, International Operations and Direct-to-Consumer, The Walt Disney Company

As Chairman, International Operations & Direct-to-Consumer, part of Disney Media & Entertainment Distribution (DMED), Rebecca Campbell oversees the Company’s streaming businesses globally, including Disney+, ESPN+, Hulu, Hotstar and the upcoming general entertainment international offering Star. In addition to leading Disney’s streaming services and the technology organization that supports them, Rebecca is in charge of regional teams stretching from Europe to Asia to Latin America including Disney’s international channels, Fox Networks International and Star India.

A longtime veteran of the Company, Rebecca previously served as President of Disneyland Resort, where she oversaw two iconic theme parks—Disneyland and Disney California Adventure, three resort hotels and Downtown Disney, and a workforce of 31, cast members. Prior to that, as President of The Walt Disney Company—EMEA in London for nearly two years, Rebecca was in charge of Disney’s media, motion pictures and all other operations across EMEA (excluding Disneyland Paris), and was responsible for a diverse team of over 5, employees operating in 59 markets with offices in 25 countries. Rebecca played a role in securing the first major distribution deal for Disney+ in EMEA and also led the integration of 21st Century Fox’s businesses with Disney’s operations across the region.

From through , Rebecca served as President, ABC Owned Television Stations, responsible for the Company’s eight local TV stations and their digital assets in New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Houston, Raleigh-Durham and Fresno. In addition, she oversaw ABC National Television sales and ABC Daytime.

From to , Rebecca served as President and General Manager of WABC-TV – New York, the group’s flagship station in the nation’s largest television market, where she was responsible for WABC-TV and all of its ancillary businesses, including two additional digital platforms and “Live with Regis and Kelly.”

Rebecca joined The Walt Disney Company in as Vice President of Programming at WPVI-TV in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. In , she was named President and General Manager of 6ABC.

Prior to her Disney tenure, she held several programming and production positions at various television stations in Allentown and Lancaster, Pennsylvania.

Throughout her career, Rebecca has received various honors for her leadership and community service, including being named Broadcaster of the Year in by the Pennsylvania Association of Broadcasters, being recognized as the Disney VoluntEAR of the Year in , and receiving the “Excellence in Mentoring” award in from the Big Brothers/Big Sisters of Greater Los Angeles.

Rebecca is a magna cum laude graduate of Bloomsburg University with a dual major in journalism and political science.

Leadership

Jenny Cohen

Executive Vice President, Corporate Social Responsibility, The Walt Disney Company

Executive Vice President, Corporate Social Responsibility, The Walt Disney Company

Jenny Cohen is Executive Vice President, Corporate Social Responsibility for The Walt Disney Company. In this role, Ms. Cohen oversees the Company’s global Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) work, building on Disney’s long legacy of operating as an honorable and socially responsible company. Ms. Cohen leads a team that works collaboratively across the enterprise to create and implement innovative initiatives and programs that positively impact our communities, consumers, employees and the environment. Ms. Cohen also manages reporting of ESG metrics to provide transparent disclosure on the Company’s progress in priority areas.

As a member of the Company’s CEO Diversity & Inclusion Council, Ms. Cohen is active in developing and implementing company-wide initiatives that promote a representative and truly inclusive culture.

From , Ms. Cohen served as Senior Vice President, Brand, Franchise and Customer Relationship Management (CRM) and was responsible for stewarding the expansion of the Company’s brands and major character franchises, developing growth strategies informed by global consumer insights, spearheading the deployment of customer data, and overseeing customer loyalty strategies and programs. Previously, she led the Company’s enterprise CRM team, where she developed and implemented strategies to cultivate stronger relationships with Disney’s fans and best customers. From , Ms. Cohen served as Vice President, Strategic Planning and New Business Development, after serving as a Director in the department from

Ms. Cohen first joined Disney in as an Analyst in Strategic Planning and New Business Development, where she worked until Before returning to Disney in , she served as Vice President of Marketing at iexchange.com, Senior Manager of Strategic Planning at Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, and Director of Marketing at Pacific Theaters.

Ms. Cohen has a degree in economics from Stanford University and received her MBA from Harvard Business School.

Leadership

Josh D’Amaro

Chairman, Disney Parks, Experiences and Products

Chairman, Disney Parks, Experiences and Products

As Chairman, Disney Parks, Experiences and Products, Josh D’Amaro oversees the global hub where Disney stories, characters and franchises come to life.

Disney Parks, Experiences and Products consists of Disney’s iconic travel and leisure businesses, which include six theme park-resort destinations in the United States, Europe and Asia; a top-rated cruise line; a popular vacation ownership program; and an award-winning guided family adventure business; and Disney’s global consumer products operations, which includes the world’s leading licensing business across toys, apparel, home goods, digital games and apps; the world’s largest children’s print publisher; Disney store locations around the world; and the shopDisney e-commerce platform.

In his previous role as President of Walt Disney World Resort, Josh was responsible for leading all facets of business for the resort’s four theme parks, two water parks, 28 resort hotels, four golf courses, two full-service spas, an extensive multi-modal transportation system, Disney’s Wedding Pavilion, ESPN Wide World of Sports Complex, and the Disney Springs entertainment-shopping-dining complex. He led a cast of more than 75,—America’s largest single-site workforce—and oversaw the beginning of the destination’s most significant expansion in the last two decades, including the opening of the Disney Skyliner aerial transportation system, Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge, Mickey and Minnie’s Runaway Railway, and Disney’s Riviera Resort. He also began the development of plans for the 50th anniversary of Walt Disney World in , which will include new entertainment experiences for the Epcot theme park and new attractions across the resort.

Before being named President of Walt Disney World in , Josh was President of the Disneyland Resort, where he opened the Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge land, and helped initiate development of an upcoming Marvel-themed land.

Josh began his Disney career in at the Disneyland Resort and held a number of leadership positions across the company. He served as Senior Vice President of Commercial Strategy for Walt Disney World Resort and also led the sites’ Resorts & Transportation Operations. Josh also served as Vice President of Disney’s Animal Kingdom Theme Park as it underwent the largest expansion in its history. His other roles included Adventures by Disney; Sales and Travel Operations at Hong Kong Disneyland Resort; Finance for the Global Licensing division of Disney Consumer Products; and Business Planning and Strategy Development for the Disneyland Resort.

Josh earned his bachelor’s degree in business administration from Georgetown University.

Leadership

Kareem Daniel

Chairman, Disney Media and Entertainment Distribution, The Walt Disney Company

Chairman, Disney Media and Entertainment Distribution, The Walt Disney Company

As Chairman of Disney Media and Entertainment Distribution, Kareem Daniel oversees Disney’s vast content commercialization and distribution ecosystem that delivers the Company’s unparalleled storytelling to audiences worldwide.

Under his leadership, the Media and Entertainment Distribution segment is responsible for the monetization of Disney’s content around the world. This entails P&L management and operation of the Company’s portfolio of streaming services including Disney+, Hulu, ESPN+ and the upcoming international general entertainment offering, Star; its linear television channels and the ABC-owned stations; theatrical film distribution; content licensing and distribution; and global advertising sales.

Using a wealth of consumer insights from across The Walt Disney Company, Mr. Daniel and his organization make content investment and distribution decisions to maximize audience engagement and commercial impact across platforms, collaborating with creative leaders in Disney’s Studios, General Entertainment, and Sports organizations.

In his previous role as President of Consumer Products, Games and Publishing, Mr. Daniel led the business in creating and delivering products across a variety of channels from the Company’s vast array of retail, wholesale and e-commerce partners to Disney stores, shopDisney, and Disney Parks.  In addition to managing the world’s largest licensing organization spanning numerous categories, he also oversaw the Company’s games and interactive experiences businesses, as well as Disney Publishing Worldwide, a leading publisher of children’s books and magazines.

Before that, Mr. Daniel was President of Walt Disney Imagineering Operations, Product Creation, Publishing and Games, where he was responsible for helping to transform IP from the various content partners into evergreen franchise properties at Disney’s parks and resorts, including Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge lands at Walt Disney World and Disneyland, Toy Story Land at Walt Disney World and Shanghai Disneyland, Pixar Pier at Disneyland and the upcoming Avengers Campus at Disney California Adventure Park.

He also served as Senior Vice President of Strategy and Business Development for Disney Consumer Products and Interactive Media, and prior to that, as Vice President of Distribution Strategy at Walt Disney Studios, where he worked closely with leadership in developing the Company’s film content distribution strategy across multiple platforms and played a key role in the commercialization of the Studio’s films. Additionally, he held the position of Director of Corporate Strategy, where he worked on a variety of strategic projects across The Walt Disney Company, including the acquisition of Marvel Entertainment in

Mr. Daniel began his Disney career as an MBA intern, later becoming a Senior Business Planner in Corporate Financial Planning and Analysis. After that, he worked in equity research, as well as investment banking at Goldman Sachs, where he specialized in technology, media & entertainment, and telecommunications, before returning to Disney.

Mr. Daniel earned his Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering and an MBA from Stanford University.

Leadership

Carlos A. Gómez

Senior Vice President and Treasurer, The Walt Disney Company

Senior Vice President and Treasurer, The Walt Disney Company

Carlos A. Gómez is Senior Vice President and Treasurer, The Walt Disney Company. He is responsible for management and oversight of the Company’s global treasury organization, which includes corporate finance, liquidity management, capital markets and banking activities, interest rate and foreign currency risk management, enterprise project and structured finance, pension and investments, enterprise consumer payments, and global cash management and treasury operations. Mr. Gómez is also responsible for managing the Company’s relationships with its banking partners and the credit rating agencies.

Mr. Gómez most recently served as Vice President, Investor Relations. In that role, he managed the Company’s relationships with research analysts and institutional investors and led the Shareholder Services team. He also formulated investor and financial communication strategy for key business initiatives, quarterly earnings releases, and mergers and acquisitions, including the acquisition of 21st Century Fox.

From to , Mr. Gómez was a member of the Corporate Finance team. He served as Director, Corporate Finance from to and was responsible for managing the Company’s day-to-day global capital markets activities, negotiating corporate credit facilities and managing relationships with the Company’s lenders. He also led the analyses of capital structure and balance sheet implications of M&A transactions, including the acquisitions of Pixar and Marvel. Mr. Gómez joined the Company in as an Analyst in the Financial Risk Management group.

Prior to rejoining the Company in , he was an Associate in the investment banking division of Goldman Sachs & Co. Mr. Gómez holds an MBA from UCLA Anderson School of Management, and a B.A. in Economics from Stanford University.

Leadership

Alan F. Horn

Chief Creative Officer, Disney Studios Content

Chief Creative Officer, Disney Studios Content

As Chief Creative Officer, Disney Studios Content, Alan Horn is focused on the creative endeavors of The Walt Disney Company’s renowned Studios division, which encompasses a collection of world-class entertainment studios that produce high-quality cinematic storytelling for both theatrical and streaming release. Among these globally respected studios are Disney, Walt Disney Animation Studios, Pixar Animation Studios, Marvel Studios, Lucasfilm, 20th Century Studios, and Searchlight Pictures. It is also home to Disney Theatrical Productions, producer of popular stage shows on Broadway and around the world.

Horn was named Chairman of The Walt Disney Studios in , becoming Co-Chairman and Chief Creative Officer in before shifting to the Chief Creative Officer role in In these roles, he presided over a time of significant growth including the integrations of Lucasfilm and the Fox film studios, as well as the Studios’ expansion into the production of content for Disney’s streaming services. Under Horn’s leadership, The Walt Disney Studios set numerous records at the box office, surpassing $7 billion globally in and and $11 billion in , the only studio ever to have reached these thresholds. Among the global hits released during his tenure are Disney’s live-action “Beauty and the Beast,” “Aladdin,” and “The Lion King”; Walt Disney Animation Studios’ “Frozen,” “Zootopia,” “Moana,” and “Frozen 2”; Pixar’s “Coco,” “Incredibles 2,” and “Toy Story 4”; Lucasfilm’s “Star Wars: The Force Awakens,” “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story,” “Star Wars: The Last Jedi,” and “Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker”; and  Marvel Studios’ “Black Panther,” “Captain Marvel,” “Avengers: Infinity War,” and “Avengers: Endgame.”

Prior to joining Disney, Horn served as President and Chief Operating Officer of Warner Bros., leading the studio’s theatrical and home entertainment operations, including the Warner Bros. Pictures Group, Warner Bros. Theatrical Ventures, and Warner Home Video. During Horn’s tenure from to , Warner Bros. was the top-performing studio at the global box office seven times and released numerous critically acclaimed films and box office hits including the eight-film Harry Potter series, “Batman Begins,” “The Dark Knight,” “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory,” “Happy Feet,” “Sherlock Holmes,” “The Departed,” “Million Dollar Baby,” the second and third Matrix films and the Ocean’s Eleven trilogy. He was an executive producer on “The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey.”

In , Horn co-founded Castle Rock Entertainment, where as Chairman he oversaw a diverse collection of popular, acclaimed film and TV properties including “A Few Good Men,” “The Shawshank Redemption,” “The Green Mile,” “When Harry Met Sally,” “City Slickers,” “In the Line of Fire,” and “Seinfeld,” the most successful show in television history. Horn previously served as President and Chief Operating Officer of Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation and as Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Embassy Communications.

A passionate environmental advocate, Horn served as chair of the Natural Resources Defense Council from to He is a member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. He serves on the American Film Institute Board of Directors and previously served on the Harvard Business School Board of Dean’s Advisors. He is the recipient of the Will Rogers Motion Picture Pioneers Foundation’s Pioneer of the Year Award, Harvard Business School’s Leadership Award and Alumni Achievement Award, the Producers Guild of America’s Milestone Award, and the Geffen Playhouse’s Distinction in Service Award.

Horn earned his MBA from Harvard Business School and served as a captain in the U.S. Air Force. In , he received an honorary Doctor of Fine Arts degree from New York’s Union College, his alma mater.

Leadership

Ronald L. Iden

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT AND CHIEF SECURITY OFFICER, The Walt Disney Company

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT AND CHIEF SECURITY OFFICER, The Walt Disney Company

Ronald L. Iden serves as Senior Vice President and Chief Security Officer, The Walt Disney Company. He joined Disney in July Mr. Iden focuses on developing and coordinating Disney's security efforts worldwide.

Mr. Iden joined Disney from the California Office of Homeland Security, where he was appointed by and served under Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger. Prior to working for the State, Mr. Iden spent 25 years with the Federal Bureau of Investigation holding a variety of roles, culminating in his appointment to lead the FBI's Los Angeles Field Office as assistant director.

Among the positions Mr. Iden held while at the FBI were: Special Agent in Charge of the Los Angeles FBI's investigations of terrorism, foreign counterintelligence, financial crimes and civil rights matters; Deputy Assistant Director of the FBI's Information Resources Division where he was responsible for the FBI's worldwide automation and information management requirements; Chief of the Information Resources Division's strategic planning, budget and personnel operations; and Chief of the FBI's Public Corruption Unit at FBI Headquarters.

Mr. Iden was appointed as a Special Agent with the FBI in May , after serving 10 years as a police officer with the Elk Grove Village, Illinois Police Department.

He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in the Administration of Criminal Justice from the University of Illinois and a Master's degree in Public Administration from the Illinois Institute of Technology.

 

Leadership

Diane Jurgens

Executive Vice President, Enterprise Technology and Chief Information Officer, The Walt Disney Company

Executive Vice President, Enterprise Technology and Chief Information Officer, The Walt Disney Company

Diane Jurgens is Executive Vice President, Enterprise Technology and Chief Information Officer, The Walt Disney Company. She oversees Disney’s global Enterprise Technology organization, which includes enterprise business systems, infrastructure, workforce enablement, and enterprise resilience engineering. Ms. Jurgens is also responsible for the planning, prioritization, implementation and operations of Disney IT systems and infrastructure across the Company in support of corporate business operations, ensuring both their strategic relevance and operational effectiveness.

Prior to joining Disney in October , Ms. Jurgens served as Chief Technology Officer for BHP, a multinational mining, metals, and petroleum company. In that role, Ms. Jurgens was responsible for leading capital program delivery, technology operations, cyber security, data privacy, digital strategy, and research and development.

A career technologist and leader, Ms. Jurgens has held numerous senior executive positions across a variety of industries including President and Managing Director of Shanghai OnStar Telematics Company, Vice President and Chief Information Officer for General Motors’ international operations, and as an executive at The Boeing Company.

Ms. Jurgens holds an MBA from Seattle University, as well as both an M.S. and B.S. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Washington.

Leadership

Nancy Lee

Senior Vice President and Chief of Staff to the Executive Chairman, The Walt Disney Company

Senior Vice President and Chief of Staff to the Executive Chairman, The Walt Disney Company

Nancy Lee is Senior Vice President and Chief of Staff to the Company’s Executive Chairman, Robert A. Iger.

In her previous role, Ms. Lee served as a Director in the Corporate Strategy and Business Development Group.  She managed M&A transactions, including the acquisition of Lucasfilm, and key strategy initiatives on a global basis.

Prior to joining Disney in , Ms. Lee was an Associate in the Technology, Media and Telecom investment banking group at Goldman Sachs & Co.

Ms. Lee serves on the board of directors for National Geographic Partners.

She holds an MBA from MIT Sloan School of Management, a JD from Georgetown University Law Center and a BA from the University of Chicago.

Leadership

Christine M. McCarthy

Senior Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, The Walt Disney Company

Senior Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, The Walt Disney Company

Christine M. McCarthy is Senior Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of The Walt Disney Company and oversees the Company’s worldwide finance organization, which includes brand and franchise management, corporate alliances, corporate real estate, corporate strategy, enterprise controllership, enterprise technology, financial planning and analysis, global product and labor standards, investor relations, risk management, tax, and treasury.

Prior to becoming CFO of The Walt Disney Company in July , Ms. McCarthy served as Executive Vice President, Corporate Real Estate, Alliances and Treasurer, The Walt Disney Company. In that role, she was responsible for the enterprise-wide management of a variety of functions, including corporate finance, capital markets, financial risk management, international treasury, insurance, pension and investments, global cash management and treasury operations, and credit and collections. She also oversaw corporate alliances and the company’s global real estate organization, including development, portfolio management and facilities management.

Prior to joining Disney in , Ms. McCarthy was the Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Imperial Bancorp from to She held various finance and planning positions at First Interstate Bancorp from to , and was elected Executive Vice President, Finance at First Interstate Bancorp in

Ms. McCarthy serves on the Board of Directors of The Procter & Gamble Company and FM Global. She is also a trustee of the Carnegie Institution for Science. Ms. McCarthy was previously on the boards of Phoenix House of California, Inc., the Los Angeles Philharmonic Association, UCLA Anderson, and Smith College. She is also a former trustee of the Westridge School in Pasadena, California. Ms. McCarthy has received numerous awards and has been named multiple times to Treasury & Risk’s “ Most Influential People in Finance,” the Top Irish American Business Leaders, and Business Insider’s “The 15 Most Influential Women in Finance.” In , she was the recipient of Treasury Today’s Adam Smith “Woman of the Year” award. In she received Los Angeles Business Journal’s “Executive of the Year” award and was honored as one of the Entertainment Diversity Council’s “Top 50 Most Powerful Women in Entertainment.”

Ms. McCarthy completed her Bachelor’s Degree in Biological Sciences at Smith College and earned an MBA from the Anderson School at UCLA.

Leadership

Zenia Mucha

Senior Executive Vice President and Chief Communications Officer, The Walt Disney Company

Senior Executive Vice President and Chief Communications Officer, The Walt Disney Company

As Senior Executive Vice President and Chief Communications Officer, Zenia Mucha is responsible for global communications for The Walt Disney Company, including acting as chief spokesperson and overseeing communication strategy and media relations for the company, its various business segments and its philanthropic and environmental initiatives. Her role also includes oversight of internal communications, the Walt Disney Archives and D

Since , Ms. Mucha has led the communications and positioning strategy for all of Disney’s strategic business initiatives including the acquisitions of Pixar, Marvel, Lucasfilm and 21st Century Fox; the Company’s leadership in leveraging digital technology to connect consumers to creative content in new and exciting ways; and its expansion and growth in international such as the landmark opening of Disney’s first theme park and resort in Mainland China, Shanghai Disney Resort.

Under her direction, Disney launched D23, the first-ever official Disney fan club, with members in all 50 states and 35 countries. Since its debut, D23 has delighted Disney fans with experiences such as the bi-annual D23 Expo: The Ultimate Disney Fan Event, year-round member-only insider access events, and the award-winning quarterly magazine, Disney Twenty-three.

Ms. Mucha originally joined the Company in , as senior vice president, Communications, for the ABC Broadcast Group and the ABC Television Network. In this role, she oversaw the communication strategy and implementation of all external and internal communications. She also had oversight of public service campaigns, audience information, internal publication and the ABC Foundation.

Prior to joining The Walt Disney Company, Ms. Mucha served as director of communications and senior policy advisor to New York State Governor George Pataki. In these roles, she counseled him on a broad range of public policy and other issues and successfully positioned him for re-election, earning a national reputation for her communication strategy and political expertise in the process. The New York Times described her role as expanded beyond communications, “to include virtually every major decision made by the Governor.”

Ms. Mucha previously served as communications director for United States Senator Alfonse D’Amato, managing his successful re-election campaigns in and She originally joined Senator D’Amato’s team in as a press representative.

In Ms. Mucha received the prestigious Matrix Award from New York Women in Communications, Inc. She has also been named one of the Most Important In-House Communicators in the World by The Holmes Report, and in was inducted in the PRWeek Hall of Fame.

Leadership

Latondra Newton

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, CHIEF DIVERSITY OFFICER, THE WALT DISNEY COMPANY

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, CHIEF DIVERSITY OFFICER, THE WALT DISNEY COMPANY

Latondra Newton was named Senior Vice President, Chief Diversity Officer of The Walt Disney Company in February She leads the Company’s strategic diversity and inclusion initiatives, helping Disney and its employees around the world tell stories that entertain, enlighten and inspire. Ms. Newton partners with various business segments and leaders across the enterprise to build on Disney’s commitment to produce entertainment that reflects a global audience and sustains a welcoming and inclusive workplace for everyone.

Prior to joining Disney, Ms. Newton served as Group Vice President, Social Innovation and Chief Diversity Officer, Toyota Motor North America, Inc. and Chief Program Officer, Toyota Mobility Foundation, Toyota Motor Corporation. She began her career at Toyota in and held a variety of senior roles spanning corporate planning, research, public affairs, marketing, philanthropy and diversity.

Ms. Newton has been recognized as a forward-thinking and progressive leader in business and diversity and inclusion throughout her career.

In , Linkage’s Women in Leadership Institute honored her with the prestigious Passionate Champion Award. In , she received an honorary doctorate of management degree from her alma mater, Kettering University. In and , she was recognized by Black Enterprise as a top executive in corporate diversity. She has been a featured speaker at the Aspen Ideas Festival and Shared Value Leadership Summit. Ms. Newton is a member of the Aspen Institute’s Business & Society Leadership Forum. She holds a bachelor’s degree in management systems from Kettering University.

 

 

Leadership

James Pitaro

Chairman, ESPN and Sports Content, The Walt Disney Company

Chairman, ESPN and Sports Content, The Walt Disney Company

Jimmy Pitaro was named Chairman, ESPN and Sports Content, on October 12, , focusing on ESPN’s live sports programming, as well as sports news and original and non-scripted sports-related content, for The Walt Disney Company’s cable channels, ESPN+, and ABC.

Previously, Mr. Pitaro was named ESPN President and Co-Chair, Disney Media Networks, on March 5, , after serving as Chairman of Disney Consumer Products and Interactive Media (DCPI). At that time, he brought his history of leading businesses focused on consumer products, digital initiatives and sports to ESPN at a pivotal point in the company’s year history: a time of unprecedented technological advancements and rapidly changing consumer habits.

Since February , Mr. Pitaro had served as Chairman of Disney’s consumer products and interactive media division, the world’s largest licenser of consumer products. Among his many responsibilities, he oversaw the creation of branded digital and physical products, including a robust digital game slate. He and his team brought to life the characters and stories of four iconic brands – Disney, Pixar, Star Wars and Marvel – across toys, apparel, home goods, the world’s largest children’s publisher, hundreds of Disney store locations worldwide, the e-commerce destination shopDisney, and the Disney Digital Network of social and digital channels that reach one out of every three U.S. social media accounts.

Mr. Pitaro originally joined The Walt Disney Company in as Co-President, Disney Interactive, where he successfully led the turnaround of the digital media and gaming division.

Mr. Pitaro came to Disney from Yahoo, where he rose to Head of Media. He was in charge of, and set strategy and executed growth driving initiatives for, Yahoo’s media properties, including Yahoo Sports and Yahoo Music. In , he was named to Sports Business Journal’s “Forty Under 40” annual list of top achievers in sports for his dynamic leadership and “breathless flurry of market-moving pacts” with major sports rightsholders and media companies. In , he was named Sports Business Journal’s Sports Executive of the Year.

Mr. Pitaro earned a Bachelor of Science degree in economics in from Cornell University. He earned his Juris Doctor from St. John’s Law School in After practicing law in New York for five years, he was named head of business affairs for Launch.com in before joining Yahoo.

A native of Westchester County, N.Y., Mr. Pitaro is ESPN’s eighth leader.

Leadership

Peter Rice

Chairman, General Entertainment Content, The Walt Disney Company

Chairman, General Entertainment Content, The Walt Disney Company

Peter Rice is chairman of Disney General Entertainment Content (DGE) which creates original entertainment and news programming for The Walt Disney Company’s streaming platforms Disney+, Hulu and Star, and its cable and broadcast networks. DGE’s extensive portfolio includes 20th Television, ABC Entertainment, ABC News, ABC Signature, Disney Branded Television, Freeform, FX, Hulu Originals, National Geographic and Onyx Collective.

Under Rice’s oversight, DGE develops, produces and markets over 4, hours of programming annually across more than entertainment and news programs. The group’s creativity has been widely recognized and honored across its entire portfolio, from National Geographic’s Oscar®-winning documentary, “Free Solo,” and Hulu Originals’ “The Handmaid’s Tale,” the first streamer to win an Emmy® for Outstanding Drama Series, to perennial favorite series including ABC’s “Grey’s Anatomy” and “black-ish,” FX’s “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia” and 20th Television Animation’s “The Simpsons,” the longest-running primetime scripted series in TV history. Additionally, Disney Branded Television has launched iconic franchises such as “High School Musical” and “Mickey Mouse Clubhouse,” and ABC News is home to the No. 1 program in the U.S. on all of broadcast and cable TV, “World News Tonight with David Muir.”

Rice joined the Company during the acquisition of 21st Century Fox’s television and film assets in He previously served as president of 21st Century Fox, and chairman and CEO of Fox Networks Group. Under his leadership, the group’s award-winning hits included TV series “,”  “American Horror Story,” “Bob’s Burgers,” “Empire,” “Modern Family” and “This Is Us.” During Rice’s tenure as president of Fox Searchlight Pictures, the studio produced “Slumdog Millionaire,” “Juno,” “Little Miss Sunshine,” “The Last King of Scotland,” “Napoleon Dynamite” and “Sideways.” As executive vice president of Production for Twentieth Century Fox, he worked on Oscar-nominated films “Moulin Rouge” and “William Shakespeare’s Romeo & Juliet,” and also served as the supervising creative executive on “X-Men.”

Rice serves on the boards for National Geographic Partners, the Motion Picture & Television Fund’s Board of Governors and Southern California Public Radio.

Sours: https://thewaltdisneycompany.com/about/

Walt Disney Pictures

American film studio

This article is about the film production studio. For the related and similarly-named distribution unit, see Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures. For the parent umbrella division, see Walt Disney Studios (division).

Walt Disney Pictures[3] is an American film production studio and subsidiary of Walt Disney Studios, which is owned by The Walt Disney Company. The studio is the flagship producer of live-action feature films within the Walt Disney Studios unit, and is based at the Walt Disney Studios in Burbank, California. Animated films produced by Walt Disney Animation Studios and Pixar Animation Studios are also released under the studio banner. Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures distributes and markets the films produced by Walt Disney Pictures.

Disney began producing live-action films in the s, under the company's all-encompassing name, Walt Disney Productions. The live-action division took on its current incorporated name of Walt Disney Pictures in , when Disney reorganized its entire studio division; which included the separation from the feature animation division and the subsequent creation of Touchstone Pictures; a sister division responsible for producing mature films not suitable for release through Walt Disney Pictures. At the end of that decade, combined with Touchstone's output, Walt Disney Pictures elevated Walt Disney Studios as one of Hollywood's major film studios.

Walt Disney Pictures is currently one of five live-action film studios within the Walt Disney Studios, the others being 20th Century Studios, Marvel Studios, Lucasfilm, and Searchlight Pictures. The remake of The Lion King is the studio's highest-grossing film worldwide with $ billion,[4] and Pirates of the Caribbean is the studio's most successful film series, with five films earning a total of over $ billion in worldwide box office gross.[2]

History[edit]

Predecessor unit[edit]

See also: The Walt Disney Company §&#;Corporate history

The studio's predecessor (and the modern-day The Walt Disney Company's as a whole) was founded as the Disney Brothers Cartoon Studio, by filmmaker Walt Disney and his business partner and brother, Roy, in

The creation of Mickey Mouse and subsequent short films and merchandise generated revenue for the studio which was renamed as The Walt Disney Studio at the Hyperion Studio in [5] In , it was renamed again to Walt Disney Productions. The studio's streak of success continued in the s, culminating with the release of the first feature-length animated film, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, which becomes a huge financial success.[6] With the profits from Snow White, Walt relocated to a third studio in Burbank, California.[7]

In the s, Disney began experimenting with full-length live-action films, with the introduction of hybrid live action-animated films such as The Reluctant Dragon () and Song of the South ().[8] That same decade, the studio began producing nature documentaries with the release of Seal Island (), the first of the True-Life Adventures series and a subsequent Academy Award winner for Best Live-Action Short Film.[9][10]

Walt Disney Productions had its first fully live-action film in with the release of Treasure Island, considered by Disney to be the official conception for what would eventually evolve into the modern-day Walt Disney Pictures.[11] By , the company ended their agreements with such third-party distributors as RKO Radio Pictures and United Artists and formed their own distribution company, Buena Vista Distribution.[12]

s–s[edit]

The live-action division of Walt Disney Productions was incorporated as Walt Disney Pictures on April 1, , to diversify film subjects and expand audiences for their film releases.[13] In April , Richard Berger was hired by Disney CEO Ron W. Miller as film president. Touchstone Films was started by Miller in February as a label for the studio's PG and R-rated films with an expected half of Disney's yearly 6-tomovie slate, which would be released under the label.[14] That same year, newly named Disney CEO Michael Eisner pushed out Berger, replacing him with Eisner's own film chief from Paramount Pictures, Jeffrey Katzenberg.[15] Touchstone and Hollywood Pictures were formed within that unit on February 15, , and February 1, , respectively.[16]

The Touchstone Films banner was used by then new Disney CEO Michael Eisner in the – television season with the short lived western, Wildside. In the next season, Touchstone produced a hit in The Golden Girls.[17]

David Hoberman was promoted to president of production at Walt Disney Pictures in April [18] In April , Hoberman was promoted to president of motion picture production at Walt Disney Studios and David Vogel was appointed as Walt Disney Pictures president.[19] The following year, however Hoberman resigned from the company, and instead began a production deal with Disney and his newly formed production company, Mandeville Films.[19] In addition to Walt Disney Pictures, Vogel added the head position of Hollywood Pictures in , while Donald De Line remained as head of Touchstone.[20] Vogel was then promoted in to the head of Buena Vista Motion Pictures Group, the newly formed division that oversaw all live-action production within the Walt Disney Pictures, Touchstone, and Hollywood labels.[21][22] The move was orchestrated by Walt Disney Studios chairman Joe Roth, as an effort to scale back and consolidate the studio's film production.[22] As a result of the restructuring, De Line resigned.[23]

That same year, Nina Jacobson became executive vice-president of live-action production for Buena Vista Motion Pictures Group.[24] Jacobson remained under this title until May , when Vogel resigned from the company, and Jacobson was appointed by Roth to the role of president of production.[25][22] During her tenure, Jacobson oversaw the production of films at Walt Disney Pictures, including Pirates of the Caribbean, The Chronicles of Narnia, Bridge to Terabithia, National Treasure,Remember the Titans, and The Princess Diaries, and was responsible for establishing a first-look deal with Jerry Bruckheimer Films.[26][27] In , Jacobson was fired by studio chairman Dick Cook, and replaced with by Oren Aviv, the head of marketing.[26][28]

After two films based on Disney theme park attractions,[29][30][31] Walt Disney Pictures selected it as a source of a line of films starting with The Country Bears () and The Haunted Mansion and Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl (both ).[32] The latter film—the first film produced by the studio to receive a PG rating—began a film series that was followed by four sequels, with the franchise taking in more than $ billion worldwide from to [29][33] On January 12, , Aviv stepped down as the studio's president of live-action production.[34]

s–present[edit]

In January , Sean Bailey was appointed the studio's president of live-action production, replacing Aviv.[35][2] Bailey had produced Tron: Legacy for the studio, which was released later that same year.[35] Under Bailey's leadership and with support from then Disney CEO Bob Iger—and later studio chairman Alan Horn—Walt Disney Pictures pursued a tentpole film strategy, which included an expanded slate of original and adaptive large-budget tentpole films. Beginning in , the studio simplified the branding in its production logo and marquee credits to just "Disney".[36] Concurrently, Disney was struggling with PG tentpole films outside of the Pirates of the Caribbean series, with films such as John Carter () and The Lone Ranger () becoming major box office bombs. However, the studio had found particular success with live-action fantasy adaptations of properties associated with their animated films, which began with the commercial success of Alice in Wonderland (), that became the second billion-dollar-grossing film in the studio's history.[37] With the continued success of Maleficent () and Cinderella (), the studio saw the potential in these fantasy adaptations and officiated a trend of similar films, which followed with The Jungle Book () and Beauty and the Beast ().[38][2] By July , Disney had announced development of nearly eighteen of these films consisting of sequels to existing adaptations, origin stories and prequels.[38][39] Although Walt Disney Pictures produced several successful smaller-budgeted genre films throughout the s, such as The Muppets (), Saving Mr. Banks (), and Into the Woods (), the studio shifted its production model entirely on tentpole films as they had found that a majority of the smaller genre films were becoming financially unsustainable in the theatrical market.[2][40][41]

In , The Walt Disney Company announced it was creating its own streaming service platform.[42] The new service, known as Disney+, would feature original programming created by the company's vast array of film and television production studios, including Walt Disney Pictures.[43] As part of this new distribution platform, Bailey and Horn confirmed that Walt Disney Pictures would renew development on smaller-budgeted genre films that the studio had previously stopped producing for the theatrical exhibition market a few years prior.[44][45][41] In , nine films were announced to be in production or development for the service.[46] These films would be budgeted between $20 million and $60 million.[44] The studio is expected to produce approximately films per year exclusively for Disney+, alongside its theatrical tentpole slate.[45] Disney+ was launched on November 12, , in the United States, Canada, and the Netherlands, with subsequent international expansions.[43] Within the first two months of the service's launch, Walt Disney Pictures had released three films (Lady and the Tramp, Noelle, and Togo) exclusively for Disney+.[41]

On March 12, , Fox Family president Vanessa Morrison was named president of live-action development and production of streaming content for both Disney Live Action and 20th Century Studios, reporting directly to Bailey. That same day, Philip Steuer and Randi Hiller were also appointed as president of the studio's physical, post production and VFX, and executive vice president for casting, respectively–overseeing these functions for both Walt Disney Pictures and 20th Century Studios.

Logo[edit]

The original Walt Disney Pictures logo, used from to
This is the Walt Disney Pictures logo, also nicknamed "the Flashlight" due to the orange castle appearing and disappearing after the arc over it is finished. This was primarily used for darker-tone and live-action films.
This is the Walt Disney Pictures logo, used since , though 'Walt Disney Pictures' would later be shortened to simply "Disney" in starting with The Muppets.

Until , instead of a traditional production logo, the opening credits of Disney films used to feature a title card that read "Walt Disney Presents", and later, "Walt Disney Productions Presents".[47] In Never Cry Wolf, and the pre-release versions of Splash, it showed a light blue rectangle with the name "Walt Disney Pictures" and featured a white outline rectangle framing on a black screen.

Beginning with the release of Return to Oz in , Walt Disney Pictures introduced its fantasy castle logo. The version with its accompanying music premiered with The Black Cauldron.[47] The logo was created by Walt Disney Feature Animation in traditional animation and featured a white silhouette of Disneyland's Sleeping Beauty Castle against a blue background, with the studio's name and underscored by "When You Wish Upon A Star", in arrangement composed by John Debney.[48] A short rendition of the logo was used as a closing logo as well as in the movie Return to Oz, although the film was released months before The Black Cauldron was released. Beginning with Dinosaur (), an alternative logo featuring an orange castle and logo against a black background, was occasionally presented with darker tone and live-action films. A computer-animatedRenderMan variant appeared before every Pixar Animation Studios film from Toy Story until Ratatouille, featuring an original fanfare composed by Randy Newman, based on the opening score cue from Toy Story.

In , the logo was updated with the release of Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest at the behest of then-Walt Disney Studios chairman Dick Cook and studio marketing president Oren Aviv.[48] Designed by Disney animation director Mike Gabriel and producer Baker Bloodworth, the modernized logo was created completely in computer animation by Weta Digital and featured a 3D New Waltograph typography. The final rendering of the logo was done by Cameron Smith and Cyrese Parrish.[49] In addition, the revamped logo includes visual references to Pinocchio, Mary Poppins, Peter Pan, Cinderella, and Dumbo, and its redesigned castle incorporates elements from both Sleeping Beauty and Cinderella Castle, as well as fireworks and Walt Disney's family crest.[50]Mark Mancina wrote a new composition and arrangement of "When You Wish Upon a Star" to accompany the logo.[48] It was co-arranged and orchestrated by David Metzger. In , starting with The Muppets, the sequence was modified to truncate the "Walt Disney Pictures" branding to "Disney".[51] The new logo sequence has been consistently modified for high-profile releases including Maleficent, Tomorrowland, and Beauty and the Beast.

Film library[edit]

Main article: List of Walt Disney Pictures films

The studio's first live-action film was Treasure Island (). Animated films produced by Walt Disney Animation Studios and Pixar are also released by Walt Disney Pictures. The studio has released four films that have received an Academy Award for Best Picture nomination: Mary Poppins (), Beauty and the Beast (), Up (), and Toy Story 3 ().[52]

Film series and franchises[edit]

Titles Release dates Notes
Mickey Mouse & Friends–present co-production with Walt Disney Animation Studios, Disneytoon Studios, and Disney Television Animation
Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs–present co-production with Walt Disney Animation Studios
Fantasiaco-production with Walt Disney Animation Studios, Jerry Bruckheimer Films (The Sorcerer's Apprentice only), Saturn Films (The Sorcerer's Apprentice only), Broken Road Productions (The Sorcerer's Apprentice only), and The Mark Gordon Company (The Nutcracker and the Four Realms only)
Dumboco-production with Walt Disney Animation Studios ( film only), Tim Burton Productions ( film only), Infinite Detective Productions ( film only), and Secret Machine Entertainment ( film only)
Bambi; TBA co-production with Walt Disney Animation Studios (first film only) and Disneytoon Studios (second film only)
Saludos Amigosco-production with Walt Disney Animation Studios
Cinderellaco-production with Walt Disney Animation Studios ( film only), Disney Television Animation (Dreams Come True only), Disneytoon Studios (animated sequels only), Kinberg Genre ( film only), Allison Shearmur Productions ( film only), and Beagle Pug Films ( film only)
Alice in Wonderlandco-production with Walt Disney Animation Studios ( film only), Roth Films (live-action films only), Team Todd (live-action films only), The Zanuck Company ( film only), and Tim Burton Productions (Alice Through the Looking Glass only)
Peter Panpresent co-production with Walt Disney Animation Studios (Peter Pan only), Disneytoon Studios (Return to Never Land only), A. Film Production (Return to Never Land only), Roth/Kirschenbaum Films (Peter Pan and Wendy only), and Whitaker Entertainment (Peter Pan and Wendy only)
Lady and the Tramp; co-production with Walt Disney Animation Studios ( film only), Disneytoon Studios (Scamp's Adventure only), and Taylor Made ( film only)
Sleeping Beauty
Maleficent
–present
present (Maleficent)
co-production with Walt Disney Animation Studios (Sleeping Beauty only) and Roth/Kirschenbaum Films (Maleficent films only)
The Shaggy Dog; co-production with Mandeville Films ( film only), Tollin/Robbins Productions ( film only), Boxing Cat Films ( film only), Robert Simonds Productions ( film only), and Shaggy Dog Productions ( film only)
Dalmatianspresent co-production with Walt Disney Animation Studios (One Hundred and One Dalmatians only), Great Oaks Entertainment ( film only), Disneytoon Studios (Patch's London Adventure only), Gunn Films (Cruella only), and Marc Platt Productions (Cruella only)
The Absent-Minded Professor co-production with Great Oaks Entertainment (Flubber only)
The Parent Trap; TBA
Mary Poppins co-production with Lucamar Productions (Mary Poppins Returns only) and Marc Platt Productions (Mary Poppins Returns only)
Winnie the Pooh–present co-production with Walt Disney Animation Studios (The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh and Winnie the Pooh only), Disneytoon Studios (The Tigger Movie, Piglet's Big Movie, and Pooh's Heffalump Movie only), and 2DUX² (Christopher Robin only)
The Jungle Book–present co-production with Walt Disney Animation Studios ( film only), Baloo Productions ( film only), Jungle Book Films ( film only), Disneytoon Studios (The Jungle Book 2 only), and Fairview Entertainment ( film only)
Herbie; ; co-production with Robert Simonds Productions (Fully Loaded only)
Dexter Riley
Witch Mountain; ; ; TBA co-production with Gunn Films (Race to Witch Mountain only)
Freaky Friday co-production with Gunn Films ( film only)
The Rescuers co-production with Walt Disney Animation Studios and Silver Screen Partners (Down Under only)
The Fox and the Hound co-production with Walt Disney Animation Studios (first film only) and Disneytoon Studios (second film only)
Tronpresent co-production with Lisberger/Kushner Productions (first film only) and Sean Bailey Productions (Tron: Legacy only)
Honey, I Shrunk the Kidspresent co-production with Silver Screen Partners (first film only), Touchwood Pacific Partners (Honey, I Blew Up the Kid only), and Mandeville Films (Shrunk only)
The Little Mermaidco-production with Walt Disney Animation Studios ( film only), Disneytoon Studios (animated sequels only), Lucamar Productions ( film only), Marc Platt Productions ( film only), and Broadway Productions ( film only)
White Fang co-production with Silver Screen Partners (first film only) and Hybrid Productions, Inc. (first film only)
Beauty and the Beast–present co-production with Walt Disney Animation Studios ( film only), Silver Screen Partners ( film only), Disney Television Animation (animated sequels only), and Mandeville Films ( film only)
The Mighty Duckspresent co-production with Avnet-Kerner Productions and Touchwood Pacific Partners (first film only)
Aladdinco-production with Walt Disney Animation Studios ( film only), Disney Television Animation (sequels only), and Rideback ( film only)
The Lion King–present co-production with Walt Disney Animation Studios ( film only), Disney Television Animation (Simba's Pride only), Disneytoon Studios (The Lion King 1½ only), and Fairview Entertainment (live-action films only)
The Santa Clause co-production with Hollywood Pictures (first film only), Outlaw Productions, and Boxing Cat films (sequels)
Pocahontas co-production with Walt Disney Animation Studios (first film only) and Disney Television Animation (Journey to a New World only)
Toy Story–present co-production with Pixar Animation Studios
The Hunchback of Notre Dame; TBA co-production with Walt Disney Animation Studios (first film only), Disney Television Animation (second film only), and Mandeville Films (live-action remake)
Hercules–; TBA co-production with Walt Disney Animation Studios
Mulan–; TBA co-production with Walt Disney Animation Studios ( film only), Disneytoon Studios (second film only), Jason T. Reed Productions ( film only), and Good Fear Productions ( film only)
Tarzanco-production with Walt Disney Animation Studios (first film only), Disney Television Animation (Tarzan & Jane only), and Disneytoon Studios (second film only)
The Emperor's New Grooveco-production with Walt Disney Animation Studios (first film only) and Disneytoon Studios (Kronk's New Groove only)
Atlantis; TBA co-production with Walt Disney Animation Studios (The Lost Empire only), Disneytoon Studios (Milo's Return only), and Disney Television Animation (Milo's Return only)
The Princess Diaries; TBA co-production with BrownHouse Productions (first film only), Shondaland (Royal Engagement only), and Martin Chase Productions (Royal Engagement only)
Monsters, Inc.–present co-production with Pixar Animation Studios
Lilo & Stitch–present co-production with Walt Disney Animation Studios (first film only), Disney Television Animation (Stitch! The Movie and Leroy and Stitch only), Disneytoon Studios (Stitch Has a Glitch only), and Rideback (live-action film)
Finding Nemo–present co-production with Pixar Animation Studios
Pirates of the Caribbeanco-production with Jerry Bruckheimer Films
Brother Bear co-production with Walt Disney Animation Studios (first film only) and Disneytoon Studios (second film only)
The Incredibles–present co-production with Pixar Animation Studios
National Treasureco-production with Jerry Bruckheimer Films, Junction Entertainment and Saturn Films
The Chronicles of Narnia co-production with Walden Media
Cars
Planes
–present
(Planes)
co-production with Pixar Animation Studios and Disneytoon Studios (Planes films only)
Enchantedpresent co-production with Right Coast Productions, Josephson Entertainment and Andalasia Productions
Tinker Bell co-production with Disneytoon Studios
The Princess and the Frog–present co-production with Walt Disney Animation Studios
Tangled
Wreck-It Ralph–; TBA
Frozen–present
Big Hero 6–present
Zootopiapresent
Moana
The Last Warriorpresent co-production with Yellow, Black & White
Stargirlpresent co-production with Gotham Group and Hahnscape Entertainment

Highest-grossing films[edit]

Walt Disney Pictures has produced five live-action films that have grossed over $1 billion at the worldwide box office: Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest (), Alice in Wonderland (), Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides (), Beauty and the Beast () and Aladdin ();[2][53] and has released eight animated films that have reached that milestone: Toy Story 3 (), Frozen (), Zootopia, Finding Dory (both ), Incredibles 2 (), The Lion King, Toy Story 4, and Frozen II (three in ).

RankTitleYearBox office gross
1 Incredibles 2 $,,
2 The Lion King $,,
3 Beauty and the Beast $,,
4 Finding Dory $,,
5 Frozen II $,,
6 Toy Story 3 $,,
7 Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest $,,
8 The Lion King $,,
9 Toy Story 4 $,,
10 Frozen $,,
11 Finding Nemo $,,
12 The Jungle Book $,,
13 Aladdin $,,
14 Inside Out $,,
15 Zootopia $,,
16 Alice in Wonderland $,,
17 Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End $,,
18 Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl $,,
19 Up $,,
20 The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe $,,
21 Monsters, Inc. $,,
22 Toy Story 2 $,,
23 Monsters University $,,
24 The Incredibles $,,
25 Moana $,,
RankTitleYearBox office gross
1 The Lion King $1,,,
2 Frozen II$1,,,
3 Frozen $1,,,
4 Beauty and the Beast $1,,,
5 Incredibles 2 $1,,,
6 Toy Story 4 $1,,,
7 Toy Story 3 $1,,,
8 Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest $1,,,
9 Aladdin $1,,,
10 Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides $1,,,
11 Finding Dory $1,,,
12 Alice in Wonderland $1,,,
13 Zootopia $1,,,
14 The Lion King $,,
15 The Jungle Book $,,
16 Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End $,,
17 Finding Nemo $,,
18 Inside Out $,,
19 Coco $,,
20 Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales$,,
21 Maleficent $,,
22 The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe $,,
23 Monsters University $,,
24 Up $,,
25 Big Hero 6 $,,

—Includes theatrical reissue(s).

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walt_Disney_Pictures

Disney pictures 2016 walt

Logo Variations - Walt Disney Pictures

Logo descriptions by Sean Beard, Matt Williams, Nicholas Aczel, Internet Movie Database, and others

Logo captures by Eric S., wolfie14, lukesams, and EnormousRat

These are the logo variations seen throughout the years by Walt Disney Pictures.

Swiss Family Robinson (): The Disney+ print uses the logo in black-and-white.

______________________________________________________________________________________

Bambi (): On the Masterpiece Collection VHS, when the logo finishes, Tinker Bell flies out of the castle and changes the screen to a scene of the movie. Only appears before the featurette, Walt Disney's Bambi: The Magic Behind the Masterpiece.
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The Lion King (, reissue):The sky is in a bluish-violet color and the sky is tinted purple.

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A Goofy Movie (): The logo fades out, but the blue background stays intact. Then, the opening credits and the movie's first scene appear over the logo's background.

Walt Disney Pictures - A Goofy Movie ()Walt Disney Pictures - A Goofy Movie ()

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Pocahontas ()and Roger Rabbit: Tummy Trouble (, VHS): In order for the logo to keep in time with the opening music, the writing of the curve-line is delayed for a few moments. Later prints of "Pocahontas" have The Hunchback of Notre Dame variant. However, "Tummy Trouble" still uses the castle on the later prints, especially the VHS and DVD of "Who Framed Roger Rabbit".
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Toy Story ():
The first film to use Pixar's special Disney logo for use on their films. The logo zooms out and fades into Andy's cloud wallpaper.

On the reissue, the sky is in dark purple tint.

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The Hunchback of Notre Dame (): The logo fades out right after the arc completes.
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That Darn Cat! ():
Cats meow to the melody of the logo.
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Jungle 2 Jungle (): A lengthier re-orchestration of the fanfare is heard, which carries over to the first portion of the TF1 International logo

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Meet the Deedles ():The logo moves into an underwater scene.
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I'll Be Home for Christmas ():
Christmas lights appear and flash constantly all over the curved line as soon as it gets drawn.
Walt Disney Pictures - I'll Be Home for Christmas ()
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Tarzan (): After the flash of light revealing the "Walt Disney" text, the background turns into a jungle.

Logo Variations - CLG Wiki

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Inspector Gadget () and Inspector Gadget 2 (): The logo is mechanized and the white curved line is replaced by a gear. On the first movie, we see the castle mechanized, but then it dismantles itself and segues into the opening credits.

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My Favorite Martian ():
The logo slowly fades into Mars. Also, the logo freezes for several seconds before the curved line gets drawn.
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Fantasia ():
After the flash of light revealing the "Walt Disney" text, the background turns into space.

Walt Disney Pictures - Fantasia ()


At the end of the movie, the arc fades into the background. This variant also appears at the end of The Emperor's New Groove.

Logo Variations - Walt Disney Pictures - CLG Wiki

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Atlantis: The Lost Empire ():
The logo is in steel. Light from the water below is seen reflected on the logo.

Logo Variations - CLG Wiki

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Recess: School's Out ():
After the flash, Gus, Mikey, Gretchen, Spinelli, Vince, and TJ play the tune on kazoos while the rest of the logo plays out.

Image result for disney recess school's out logo variant

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Monsters, Inc. (): The opening logo is cut down to the last few seconds of the line drawing. The full logo is shown at the end with the closing music playing over it.

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The Country Bears ():
The logo plays normally, but after that, it's on a wood background. A fire spark goes all the way to the bottom right.

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Lilo & Stitch (): The logo is on a black background, and the flash that draws the curve line is now green and has a "pulsing" sound effect. The logo as whole is stolen by a UFO beam.

Logo Variations - CLG WikiLogo Variations - CLG Wiki

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Stitch's Trail ():
A deleted scene from the Lilo & Stitch DVD. The logo is on a gray background, the logo is all white, and alien text switches between letters before the text switches to English.
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Return to Never Land ():
As the curved line animates, pixie dust falls from it. A yellow glowing ball is drawing the curved line and then flies around and into the gate. Then, the logo zooms out to the left and is revealed to be on a cloud. The camera then pans around as the logo suddenly disappears as the movie begins.

disney2
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Cinderella II: Dreams Come True (): The logo is formed by fireworks and the "Walt Disney" text writes itself. And the logo fades to a Cinderella castle, seguing into the opening credits.
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Treasure Planet (): The logo is cut to the last few seconds. This variant is also seen at the end of the film.
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Snow Dogs (): After the curved line draws, the logo turns icy and starts to snow.

Walt Disney Pictures "Snow Dogs" ()

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The Jungle Book 2 ():
The logo is in front of a piece of cloth behind a blue light as the logo fully animates, until it fades and the color changes. Also, the characters Shanti (Mae Whitman), Ranjan (Connor Funk), and Ranjan's father (John Rhys-Davies) are heard talking during this.

disney
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Piglet's Big Movie (): The line drawing over the castle is pink instead of white, representing Piglet.

Walt Disney Pictures - Piglet's Big Movie ()

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Stitch! The Movie (): The logo dissolves into the opening scene.

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Freaky Friday (): One of the last films to use the original fanfare. The logo animates as normal, then fades into an aged parchment page, transitioning into the film's opening credits.

Logo Variations - CLG Wiki

At the end of the film, the logo starts when the castle is fully formed, it animates at a little smoother rate, and the curved line's shadowed reflection is not seen.
Walt Disney Pictures - Freaky Friday ()
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The Lizzie McGuire Movie (): The castle zooms in rapidly by segments, followed by letters coming (one after one) from the left. Then the logo begins to flash blue and red, like police lights. The curved line drawing is blue, and after the logo is done, it disappears, and the logo itself moves to the right. At the end of this film, the same logo from the film's opening is already formed, the flashing blue and red lights are removed, and after the curved line is formed, the logo fades out.

Walt Disney Pictures ()

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Dalmatians II: Patch's London Adventure ():
Dogs bark to the melody of the logo.
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George of the Jungle 2 (): After the logo is completed, George swings around the screen and hits the castle, causing it to fall over.
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The Haunted Mansion (): The castle turns into a mansion while dark clouds cover the words.

Logo Variations - CLG Wiki

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Lorenzo ():The logo is made up of colorful neon signs. Also, the logo is animated the way neon signs are.

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The Princess Diaries 2: Royal Engagement (): A re-orchestrated version of the music plays over the logo.

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Home on the Range ():
The logo is branded onto a piece of leather and then burns up.
Walt Disney Pictures (Home on the Range)

At the end of the film, the logo fades in on the brown background used for the credits.
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Teacher's Pet ():
The logo is animated in the same style of the movie. The opening theme from Pinocchio () is used.

Walt Disney Pictures (, Teacher's Pet variant)

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Mickey's Twice Upon a Christmas (): The logo is red over a Christmas ornament on a Christmas tree in the same style of the movie.

Logo Variations - CLG Wiki

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Pooh's Heffalump Movie (): The logo turns into a cloud which resembles a castle.

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Lilo & Stitch 2: Stitch Has a Glitch (): The logo encounters a glitch, just like a computer would do. Also, the castle segments go backwards at the beginning, starting from the bottom segment of the castle appearing and more segments appear one-by-one until the top segment appears and then, the top segment flashes like a neuralyzer.

Walt Disney Pictures - Lilo & Stitch 2: Stitch Has a Glitch ()

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The Pacifier (): The standard "flashlight" variant is used, but a suspenseful rendition of "When You Wish Upon a Star" plays over the logo.

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Ice Princess ():
The "flashlight" logo is blue with ice coming out of the curved line. Also, the song "No One" by Aly & AJ begins playing.

Walt Disney Pictures "Ice Princess" ()

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Sky High ():
The logo fades into a silhouette of the Disney castle as seen in the skyline.

Logo Variations - CLG Wiki
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Chicken Little ():
The logo is on a sky background with a more realistically-rendered and colored Sleeping Beauty castle, and the "Walt Disney PICTURES" text zooms out and places itself under the castle instead of appearing in a flash, all rendered in the same style of the movie. Presumably a placeholder logo before developing the logo.

Walt Disney Pictures (, Chicken Little variant)

At the end of the movie, the standard logo plays, but the background is black instead of blue.

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Tarzan II ():
Exactly like on Tarzan, but the jungle is more detailed.
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Brother Bear II ():
Birds fly out from behind the logo.

Logo Variations - CLG Wiki

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Bambi II (): The castle is surrounded by mist.

Walt Disney Pictures "Bambi II" ()

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Leroy & Stitch (): At the end, the background fades to space and the logo goes into hyperdrive.
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The Fox and the Hound 2 (): After the logo finishes, the logo then fades to a morning sky background.

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The Shaggy Dog ():The castle turns into a doghouse.
Walt Disney Pictures "The Shaggy Dog" ()

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The Wild (): In the darkness, the particle makes its usual way above the castle while in voice-over Samson the lion is about to tell his son Ryan a story. Suddenly, as Ryan tells Samson he already heard his story a billion times it stops and rushes back. Then as the conversation repeats, it tries again, makes 2/3 of the distance, and rushes back again. Next time, the conversation occurs again and the particle is being drawn back by a hand. For the fourth time, the particle (and thus, Samson) finally succeeds, and the logo turns into the in-movie sun. The text is in 3-D, made of stone, and has some acacia trees surrounding the castle.

Walt Disney (; The Wild)

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The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause (): When the logo fully forms, the camera zooms out to reveal a snow globe surrounding it that Santa holds. He then shakes the snow globe, which causes snow to surround the castle.

Walt Disney Pictures - The Santa Clause 3 The Escape Clause ()

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Enchanted (): After the logo fully forms, the camera pans up from the castle into a room in the top middle of it.

Walt Disney Pictures - Enchanted ()
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Presto (): At the beginning of the short that was shown before WALL-E, we see the castle on a red textured background as an homage to the old Disney cartoons. It reads "Walt Disney Pictures Presents" underneath.
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Bedtime Stories (): The logo turns into a pop-up book.

Logo Variations - Walt Disney Pictures - CLG Wiki

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Beverly Hills Chihuahua (): The logo moves into the opening title.

Logo Variations - Walt Disney Pictures - CLG Wiki

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High School Musical 3: Senior Year ():
The logo morphs into a disco ball.

Logo Variations - Walt Disney Pictures - CLG Wiki
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Race to Witch Mountain ():
The logo darkens and the castle turns into the titular mountain.
Walt Disney Studios ()
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Jonas Brothers: The 3D Concert Experience ():
The music is a rock version of the fanfare.
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G-Force ():
Sounds heard in the movie accompany the logo.
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Alice in Wonderland ():
The logo is darker than usual.
Walt Disney Pictures - Alice in Wonderland ()
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Tron: Legacy (): The logo is gradually formed by graphics like those found in the Grid. The company name is slightly off-center.
Walt Disney Pictures (Tron Legacy Variant)
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Mars Needs Moms ():
The logo is tinted in red except for the company name.
Walt Disney Pictures - Mars Needs Moms ()
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Prom (): The logo starts off normally before turning into a pencil drawing placed on a scrapbook page. The "Walt Disney" scrap of paper is part of the logo. The fanfare also turns into a rock version of the fanfare when the logo transforms.
Walt Disney Pictures - Prom ()
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Winnie the Pooh (): The logo is tinted in yellow except for the sky, the castle, and the company's name.
Logo Variations - Walt Disney Pictures - CLG Wiki
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Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides (): The logo fades in from blue fog, the flag on top of the castle is replaced by the Jolly Roger flag, mermaids appear in the river, and the logo is tinted in dark blue.

At the end of the film, the logo is still tinted in dark blue.
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John Carter ():
The logo is tinted entirely in deep red, except for the "Disney" text, which is in its normal silver color.
Walt Disney Pictures (John Carter)
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Frankenweenie (): The logo starts as normal in color. In the final few seconds before "Disney" is revealed, the music changes into an organ piece and the logo transforms into the trailer variant without the rain.
Also, the music is re-orchestrated.
Walt Disney Pictures "Frankenweenie" ()

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The Odd Life of Timothy Green ():
The logo fades to white.
Walt Disney Pictures (The Odd Life of Timothy Green variant)
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Wreck-It Ralph ():
At the end of the movie, the logo glitches as errors appear with "RALPH" misspelled as "RALF". Then, it turns into a parody of the Pac-Man kill screen. The logo is briefly seen. The logo ends with a TV off effect.
Walt Disney Pictures - Wreck-It Ralph ()

At the end of Paperman, the short film shown before Wreck-It Ralph, the logo is black & white, "Disney" is written in chalk, and the castle is stylized like the short. Also, the curved line is drawn by a paper airplane from the short.
Walt Disney Pictures (Paperman)

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Oz the Great and Powerful (): The logo is in black and white, in an art-deco style, and in a aspect ratio like the first fifteen minutes of the film. The stars in the background are cheaply animated and the logo zooms out from the top of the castle to show the entire logo, with the "Disney" text already formed. The camera then zooms in through the castle gate and into the opening credits sequence.

Logo Variations - Walt Disney Pictures - CLG Wiki

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The Lone Ranger (): The logo is a darkish-gray color.

Logo Variations - Walt Disney Pictures - CLG Wiki
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Planes ():
When the logo finishes, the highest tower of the castle begins to shine like a lighthouse. After one full rotation of light, the flag on top of the tower becomes a blinking red light and two planes fly past the logo towards the screen, transitioning into the opening scene of the film.

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Get a Horse! (): The logo is in black and white, with "Disney" written in an older-looking signature font with an underline. Clarabelle Cow is seen leaping over the castle and leaves behind the trail of pixie dust.
Walt Disney Pictures (Get a Horse variant)

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Maleficent (): The parts of the castle have been rearranged into the same formation as Maleficent's.

Maleficent ()

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Into the Woods ():
At the beginning of the movie, the logo fades from black (similar to Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides, but without the fog), and it is darkened. The fireworks are absent. The glowing pinpoint fades in, moving as usual, arcs over the castle becoming the moon and the sparkles disappear early. The camera backs up into the woods as the "Disney" text appears. The logo fades to black. The opening sounds are used.

Logo Variations - Walt Disney Pictures - CLG Wiki

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Feast ():The logo is decorated on a plate, and the man in the short squirts ketchup onto the plate, creating the arc over the castle.

Logo Variations - Walt Disney Pictures - CLG Wiki
Logo Variations - Walt Disney Pictures - CLG Wiki

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Million Dollar Arm ():The logo is darker than usual. Also, the logo is shaded in purple.

Logo Variations - Walt Disney Pictures - CLG Wiki

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Cinderella ():
The 3D variation of the logo fades to the opening shot of the film (which, oddly enough, isn't in 3D).

Logo Variations - Walt Disney Pictures - CLG Wiki

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Tomorrowland (): The castle is replaced with Tomorrowland's buildings and structures, complete with flying machines.

Logo Variations - Walt Disney Pictures - CLG Wiki

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Frozen Fever (): The castle appears as normal, but one of the tiny snowmen from the short is standing on the right, and leaps over the

castle from right to left, leaving a trail in the shape of the usual arc.

Logo Variations - Walt Disney Pictures - CLG Wiki

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Zootopia (): Normal on the actual film, but in an advertisement for the film's video release, the front of the castle logo is grafted on top of the Zootopia skylinein a scene from the film, with the arc being formed as usual but wider, and "Disney" appears below as usual in the same color and texture as the film's logo.

Walt Disney Pictures - Zootopia ()

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The Jungle Book (): The entire logo, including the fireworks and the castle, is recreated in traditional, hand-drawn animation. The word "Disney" is gold and when the logo finishes the word "Presents", in the same font as the opening credits of the film fades in below "Disney" before the logo zooms out to a hand-painted jungle that transforms into a photorealistic, CG jungle. At the end of the movie, it's the normal closing variant but "Disney" zooms in off center.

Walt Disney Pictures - The Jungle Book ()

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The Finest Hours (): The logo is darker and shaded in sepia brown.

The Finest Hours ()

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Beauty and the Beast ():The logo features the Prince's castle (with Villeneuve village in the background) in the evening before his masquerade party starts. A rosebush appears near the castle and the Enchantress picks a rose from it, leading into the opening.

Disney "Beauty and the Beast" () [1]Disney "Beauty and the Beast" () [2]

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Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales ():The logo is stormy sky, the fireworks are absent and the logo is slightly darker, similar to the Into the Woods variant. Also, the flag on the top of the castle is replaced once again by the Jolly Roger flag, the spark that draws the curved line is noticeably absent and the sparkles forming the "Disney" text are nowhere to be seen..

Walt Disney Pictures ()

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The Last Warrior (, Russia): The flag and the bottom of the castle look slightly different and as soon as the logo's panning animation finishes, a chicken wearing a house costume on its head can be seen jumping through the river. Also, the sparkles forming the "Disney" text are nowhere to be seen.

Walt Disney Pictures ()

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Coco (): The music is a Mexican-style version of the logo's theme.

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A Wrinkle in Time ():The logo starts as normal in color. At the end after "Disney" is revealed, the music ends and the logo transforms into the trailer variant.

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Incredibles 2 (): The theme and the style of the movie as well as the art of the comic book are incorporated in the logo. It is in different shades of red and the word "Disney" is yellow.

Disney "Incredibles 2" ()Disney Incredibles 2 () 2

At the end of the movie, the full normal version is used, with the closing theme of the movie that segues into the Pixar Animation Studios logo playing over the logo.

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Christopher Robin (): The logo changes into a hand drawn illustration of the logo on a book page.

Disney "Christopher Robin" ()

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The Nutcracker and the Four Realms (): The logo's music is reorchestrated. Also, at the end of the logo, the company's name fades out. A bird flies in and the camera follows the bird by panning left from the castle to the movie's opening scene.

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Mary Poppins Returns (): The logo has the London skyline, the Big Ben, and Tower Bridge behind the castle. Also, the river in front of the castle is replaced by a road and sidewalk and there are also trees and lampposts in front of the castle.

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Ralph Breaks the Internet (): At the end of the movie, Ralph talks over the logo (as well as the Walt Disney Animation Studios one) as "Never Gonna Give You Up" finishes. He says "Alright, well, you're welcome to stay. There's not really any more surprises, but you know. Good luck getting that song out of your head, it's a real earwig. Anyway, what else, uhh" before being cut off by the logo turning off with a TV effect, that was directly re-used from the first film.

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Aladdin ():The logo is tinted in a dark yellow shade and, at the end, a light shines to the upper left of the castle and segues to the opening scene, with "Disney" fading out.

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Toy Story 4 (): The logo plays as normal, but Randy Newman's score replaces the normal music.

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The Lion King ():Same as the Jungle Book variant, but without the word "Presents". When "Disney" fades in, it's still and it's large. Also, the camera stops moving just before the final three notes are heard and when the logo finishes, the logo fades out. At the end of the movie, the full normal version (like the one in Incredibles 2) is shown, but silent.

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Maleficent: Mistress of Evil (): As the logo finishes, the camera moves in an upper right direction, panning away from the logo.

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Lady and the Tramp (): Once the logo finishes, the logo turns into a sepia-tinted version with some brown highlights.

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Noelle (): At the very end of the logo, the company name fades out. After that, snow begins falling over the logo. Then, Santa Claus rides with his sleigh and reindeer over the castle. The camera then follows Santa Claus and his sleigh through said castle.


Sours: https://www.closinglogos.com/page/Logo_Variations_-_Walt_Disney_Pictures
Walt Disney Pictures Logo History - The Remake

List of Walt Disney Pictures films

Title US Release Co-production companies and notes HFantasia January 1, Walt Disney Feature AnimationAThe Tigger MovieFebruary 11, Disney MovieToons and Walt Disney Animation (Japan) Inc. LWhispers: An Elephant's TaleMarch 10, ADinosaurMay 19, Walt Disney Feature Animation and The Secret Lab; first film to use the logo LDisney's The KidJuly 7, LRemember the TitansSeptember 29, Jerry Bruckheimer Films and Technical Black Films L DalmatiansNovember 22, AThe Emperor's New GrooveDecember 15, Walt Disney Feature AnimationARecess: School's OutFebruary 16, Walt Disney Television Animation and Paul & Joe Productions ALady and the Tramp II: Scamp's Adventure ‡ February 27, Disney MovieToonsAAtlantis: The Lost EmpireJune 15, Walt Disney Feature AnimationLThe Princess DiariesAugust 3, BrownHouse ProductionsLMax Keeble's Big MoveOctober 5, Karz Entertainment AMonsters, Inc.November 2, Pixar Animation StudiosLSnow DogsJanuary 18, The Kerner Entertainment CompanyAReturn to Never LandFebruary 15, Disney MovieToons and A. Film A/SACinderella II: Dreams Come True ‡ February 26, Walt Disney Television AnimationLThe RookieMarch 29, Gran Via ProductionsALilo & StitchJune 21, Walt Disney Feature AnimationLThe Country BearsJuly 26, Gunn FilmsASpirited Away[N 2]September 20, Studio GhibliLTuck EverlastingOctober 11, Scholastic EntertainmentLThe Santa Clause 2November 1, Outlaw Productions and Boxing Cat Films ATreasure PlanetNovember 27, Walt Disney Feature AnimationA Dalmatians II: Patch's London Adventure ‡ January 21, Disney MovieToons and Walt Disney Television AnimationAThe Jungle Book 2February 14, Disney MovieToonsLInspector Gadget 2 ‡ March 11, The Kerner Entertainment CompanyAPiglet's Big MovieMarch 21, Disney MovieToons and Munich AnimationDGhosts of the Abyss[N 5]April 11, Walden Media, Earthship Productions, Ascot Elite Entertainment Group, Golden Village, Telepool and UGC PH LHolesApril 18, Walden Media, Phoenix Pictures and Chicago Pacific Entertainment HThe Lizzie McGuire MovieMay 2, Stan Rogow Productions AFinding NemoMay 30, Pixar Animation StudiosLPirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black PearlJuly 9, Jerry Bruckheimer FilmsLFreaky FridayAugust 6, Gunn FilmsAStitch! The Movie ‡ August 26, Walt Disney Television AnimationLGeorge of the Jungle 2 ‡ October 21, The Kerner Entertainment CompanyABrother BearNovember 1, Walt Disney Feature AnimationLThe Haunted MansionNovember 26, Gunn FilmsLThe Young Black StallionDecember 25, The Kennedy/Marshall CompanyATeacher's PetJanuary 16, Walt Disney Television AnimationLMiracleFebruary 6, Mayhem PicturesAThe Lion King 1½ ‡ February 10, Disneytoon StudiosLConfessions of a Teenage Drama QueenFebruary 20, ASpringtime with Roo ‡ March 9, Disneytoon StudiosAHome on the RangeApril 2, Walt Disney Feature AnimationDSacred PlanetApril 22, LAround the World in 80 Days[N 2]June 16, Walden Media, Spanknyce Films, and Mostow/Lieberman Productions DAmerica's Heart and SoulJuly 2, Blacklight Films LThe Princess Diaries 2: Royal EngagementAugust 11, Shondaland and Martin Chase Productions AMickey, Donald, Goofy: The Three Musketeers ‡ August 17, Disneytoon StudiosAThe IncrediblesNovember 5, Pixar Animation StudiosAMickey's Twice Upon a Christmas ‡ November 9, Disneytoon StudiosLNational TreasureNovember 19, Jerry Bruckheimer Films, Junction Entertainment and Saturn FilmsDAliens of the DeepJanuary 28, Walden Media and Earthship Productions AMulan II ‡ February 1, Disneytoon StudiosAPooh's Heffalump MovieFebruary 11, LThe PacifierMarch 4, Spyglass Entertainment and Offspring EntertainmentLIce PrincessMarch 18, Bridget Johnson Films & Skate Away Productions ATarzan II ‡ June 14, Disneytoon Studios and Toon City AnimationLHerbie: Fully LoadedJune 22, Robert Simonds Productions AHowl's Moving Castle[N 2]July 10, Studio GhibliLSky HighJuly 29, Gunn FilmsAValiant[N 2]August 19, Vanguard Animation and Odyssey EntertainmentALilo & Stitch 2: Stitch Has a Glitch ‡ August 30, Disneytoon StudiosAPooh's Heffalump Halloween Movie ‡ September 13, LThe Greatest Game Ever PlayedSeptember 30, Fairway Films AChicken LittleNovember 4, Walt Disney Feature AnimationLThe Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the WardrobeDecember 9, Walden MediaAKronk's New Groove ‡ December 13, Disneytoon Studios and Toon City AnimationLGlory RoadJanuary 13, Jerry Bruckheimer Films, Texas Western Productions and Glory Road Productions ABambi IIJanuary 26, (Argentina)
February 7, (DTV) Disneytoon StudiosDRoving MarsJanuary 27, The Kennedy/Marshall Company and White Mountain Films LEight BelowFebruary 17, Spyglass Entertainment, Mandeville Films and The Kennedy/Marshall CompanyLThe Shaggy DogMarch 10, Mandeville Films, Tollin/Robbins Productions, Boxing Cat Films, Robert Simonds Productions, and Shaggy Dog Productions AThe WildApril 14, C.O.R.E. Feature Animation, Hoytyboy Pictures, Sir Zip Productions and Contrafilm; last film to use the logo ACarsJune 9, Pixar Animation StudiosALeroy and Stitch ‡ June 27, Walt Disney Television AnimationLPirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's ChestJuly 7, Jerry Bruckheimer Films; first film to use the logo LInvincibleAugust 25, Mayhem PicturesABrother Bear 2 ‡ August 29, Disneytoon StudiosAThe Nightmare Before Christmas 3D[N 6]October 27, Skellington ProductionsLThe Santa Clause 3: The Escape ClauseNovember 3, Outlaw Productions & Boxing Cat Productions AThe Fox and the Hound 2 ‡ December 12, Disneytoon Studios; last film to use the logo ACinderella III: A Twist in Time ‡ February 6, Disneytoon StudiosLBridge to TerabithiaFebruary 16, Summit Entertainment and Walden MediaAMeet the RobinsonsMarch 30, Walt Disney Animation StudiosLPirates of the Caribbean: At World's EndMay 25, Jerry Bruckheimer FilmsARatatouilleJune 29, Pixar Animation StudiosHThe Secret of the Magic Gourd * June 29,
January 27, (DTV) Chinese film; Centro Digital Pictures LimitedLUnderdogAugust 3, Spyglass Entertainment, Classic Media and Maverick FilmsDThe Pixar StoryAugust 28, Leslie Iwerks Productions LThe Game PlanSeptember 28, Mayhem Pictures; last film to be distributed by Buena Vista Pictures DistributionHEnchantedNovember 21, Right Coast Productions, Josephson Entertainment, and Andalasia Productions; first film to be distributed by Walt Disney Studios Motion PicturesLNational Treasure: Book of SecretsDecember 21, Jerry Bruckheimer Films, Junction Entertainment and Saturn FilmsLHannah Montana and Miley Cyrus: Best of Both Worlds ConcertFebruary 1, PACE LCollege Road TripMarch 7, Gunn FilmsLThe Chronicles of Narnia: Prince CaspianMay 16, Walden MediaAWALL-EJune 27, Pixar Animation StudiosAThe Little Mermaid: Ariel's Beginning ‡ August 26, Disneytoon StudiosATinker BellSeptember 18,
October 28, (DTV) LBeverly Hills ChihuahuaOctober 3, Mandeville FilmsDMorning LightOctober 17, LHigh School Musical 3: Senior YearOctober 24, Borden and Rosenbush Entertainment ARoadside Romeo * Walt Disney Pictures India, Yash Raj Films and Disney World CinemaABoltNovember 21, Walt Disney Animation StudiosLBedtime StoriesDecember 25, Gunn Films, Happy Madison Productions, Offspring Entertainment and Conman & Izzy Productions LJonas Brothers: The 3D Concert ExperienceFebruary 27, Jonas Films LRace to Witch MountainMarch 13, Gunn FilmsLHannah Montana: The MovieApril 10, It's a Laugh Productions and Millar Gough Ink NEarth[N 7]April 22, as Disneynature; BBC Natural History Unit, BBC Worldwide, Discovery Channel and Greenlight Media AG LTrail of the PandaMay 8, Disney World Cinema and Castle Hero Pictures DThe Boys: The Sherman Brothers' StoryMay 22, Crescendo Productions, Red Hour Films, and Traveling Light AUpMay 29, Pixar Animation StudiosLLilly the Witch: The Dragon and the Magic Book * June 12, German film LG-ForceJuly 24, Jerry Bruckheimer FilmsAPonyo[N 7]August 14, Studio GhibliATinker Bell and the Lost TreasureSeptember 3, (Argentina)
October 27, (DTV) Disneytoon StudiosDWalt & El GrupoSeptember 9, Walt Disney Family Foundation Films and Theodore Thomas Productions LThe Book of Masters * October 29, Russian film; Trite ADisney's A Christmas CarolNovember 6, ImageMovers DigitalLOld DogsNovember 25, Tapestry Films AThe Princess and the FrogDecember 11, Walt Disney Animation Studios
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Walt_Disney_Pictures_films

Now discussing:

I exhaled and, getting on all fours, moved closer. His bottom smelled like a mixture of sweat, diaper rash and something he didn't want to think about. I touched his hairy buttocks, parted them.



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