Best television sets 2015

Best television sets 2015 DEFAULT

Well, it's about to happen. is the year 4K replaces p.

I don't mean TVs with 4K resolution will surpass those with p resolution in total sales. That won't happen for another few years, according to most industry analysts. What I mean is that in , 4K TV will replace p TVs as our top recommendations at CNET.

Like all predictions, that could be wrong, but from what I've seen of TV makers' product lines -- specific information I can't share until they make their announcements, typically on CES press day, Jan 5, -- the 4K TVs will be the best TVs next year. Not just for picture quality among high-end LCD models, which is already the case, but also for picture quality for the money on midrange sets.

4K goes mainstream, p goes bargain

That doesn't change my advice for people who want to buy a TV now. p still provides the best picture for the money today. Nor does it mean that 4K resolution suddenly delivers dramatically better quality than p resolution. At most screen sizes and seating distances, based on side-by-side comparisons I've done, the benefits of 4K resolution are still negligible.

What has changed is that TV makers are basically putting all the picture quality enhancements that do matter -- local dimming, better color and better panel technology--into 4K TVs, and leaving p TVs in the bargain bin with mediocre picture quality. 4K resolution LCD panels are going to be midrange TVs, and biggest manufacturers are actually making more series of 4K TVs than p TVs in , offering a range of price points, sizes down to 40 inches, and differentiating features.

Oh, and don't be surprised if we even see an 8K TV or two. Just remember that 8K prototypes have been stalking the CES floor as early as -- they are not new, nor will they be showing up in stores anytime soon.

Quantum Dots vs. light-emitting diodes

4K will be everywhere, but so will claims about improved color. Samsung, for example, says it's ditching OLED for Quantum Dot, a technology said to improve color gamut and saturation. We explained how Quantum Dot works in , and we liked its effect on the Sony KDLWA, but we don't expect a revolutionary improvement.

The same goes for other extras said to closer approach new color specs like DCI or Rec First, content that adheres to those specs is nonexistent today. Second and most important, they're still LCD TVs, and we don't expect them to match plasma's quality, let alone OLED.

LG, for its part, is expected to announce new OLED TVs in That's great, but don't expect them to be significantly cheaper than today's models -- which start at $3, for a incher , and $10, for the and $25, for the incher. Most video enthusiasts who care enough to splurge for OLED want a TV in the inch or larger size, and I'd be really surprised if a inch OLED sold for less than, say, $6, in

Three other things that would also surprise me: p OLEDs larger than 55 inches; any other TV maker aside from LG shipping OLEDs in and prices for any OLED dipping below $2, in We should see a few more non-curved OLED sets, however.

It curves, it bends!

Speaking of curved, I would be surprised if many other TV makers besides Samsung announced more curved LCD TVs for The technology, er, aesthetic, doesn't seem to have grabbed the same level of consumer enthusiasm as thin LED LCD. Maybe because, aside from style, it's basically a gimmick. It will be interesting to see if Samsung itself, the dominant TV maker, hedges its bet on curved by bringing out essentially the same level of performance in a both form factors throughout its TV line, giving consumers a more straightforward choice between curved and flat.

And what of the bendable TVs from Samsung and LG, which made a big splash at CES ? Don't count out similarly bizarre concept TVs, perhaps including bendier LCDs or even LG's rollable OLED in sizes larger than 18 inches.

The smart and the absent

The big news in smart TV is likely to be alternate platforms. Sony, Sharp and Philips all said they'd release models with Android TV -- the same system used by the Google Nexus Player -- built-in. Samsung, for its part, is touting its new Tizen TV operating system. Me, I'd be happy to tout more TV makers aside from TCL and Hisense with Roku built-in .

Well-known TV makers aside from Samsung and LG, the two worldwide market leaders, might be more conspicuous by their absence. Panasonic pared down its TV line significantly in , as did Sony, and recent massive losses might portend even fewer Sony TVs at the show. Sharp was late to the 4K show this year. And Vizio, the No. 2 TV maker in the US, announced in February that it won't even have a showcase at CES, opting instead for "more intimate venues."

4K and Internet TV: Content is king

Beyond the TVs, I'm hoping for more concrete announcements about, you know, actual 4K content. Following the launch of Netflix and Amazon 4K streaming, Comcast and other cable providers are expected to 4K-ify their apps for streaming to compatible 4K TVs. DirecTV just started its own 4K streams in addition to launching a 4K-capable satellite, and news trickles out that we'll see 4K Blu-ray by the end of Nobody expects 4K TV broadcasts or dedicated 4K TV channels anytime soon, but I wouldn't be surprised if a one-off sporting event was announced in 4K at the show.

Streaming and alternate delivery ventures that challenge cable TV in the US are good candidates to steal the show. We expect Sony to offer more details on its PlayStation Vue video streaming service, which is due in early Likewise, Dish could pull the wraps off its competing Web video service, rumored to be called NuTV. CES is also a good place for a dark horse to launch a similar service, or even for traditional networks to follow CBS and HBO with standalone Web TV packages. (Note: CNET is a division of CBS.)

See ya there!

The massive consumer electronics show is anything but intimate, but its frenzy and hyperbole make it ideal for displaying crazy-big TVs. We look forward to being there again next month, and we'll have complete wall-to-wall coverage from Las Vegas starting the first weekend in January.

Now playing:Watch this: Is it worth paying extra for 4K?

Sours: https://www.cnet.com/tech/home-entertainment/cestvs-4k-all-the-way/

The best TV in Top TVs from LG, Samsung, TCL, Vizio and more

You know you want the best TV, but finding the right model for your home and budget isn't always easy. Checking all the right boxes is tough, especially as features like 8K resolution, OLED and QLED displays, mini-LED, HDR, smart home connectivity, voice control and more make it increasingly complex to find the TV you want. It's not as simple as buying the most expensive model you can afford, you want the whole package – you want great picture quality, rich sound, and all of the smart features available today, and it would be nice to save a buck or two while you're at it.

We’ve tested and reviewed the latest TVs from all the best TV brands including LG, Sony, and Samsung to help you choose the right TV for your home. Every TV goes through hours of testing and eyes-on viewing, so that we can find the best TV for your budget and needs.

People like to throw around a lot of acronyms and numbers when they’re talking about the best TVs, but we’ve made it our mission to offer you real-world advice that cuts through all the jargon and explains exactly what these TVs can do for you. We’ll let you know about the specs, of course, but we’ll also explain what this will mean for your viewing experience, whether that’s the improved picture quality that 4K resolution brings, or the vibrant colors that HDR TVs offer. Tom’s Guide has your back when it comes to finding the best TVs. 

What are the best TVs?

For our standout favorite, the Samsung QN90A Neo QLED is the best TV we've reviewed, delivering superb picture quality with its combination of QLED color and mini-LED backlight (the ingredients that make up Neo QLED). Pair that performance with fantastic sound, rich smart features and a stylish design, and you've got the best TV we've reviewed this year. Just be aware that this premium 4K smart TV doesn't come cheap.

The TCL 6-Series Roku TV (R) is the ultimate in affordable TVs, giving you the best 4K smart TV we've seen for less than $1, In fact, ignoring the budget-friendly price, it's still one of the best TVs on the market, thanks to a quantum-dot enhanced LCD and mini-LED-backed display and feature-rich Roku TV interface. Combine this with superior gaming features and a refined design, and it's got plenty to love. (And if you're looking to get similar quality on a more expensive 8K TV, the new TCL 6-Series 8K Roku TV R does it at a surprisingly reasonable price.)

The best TVs you can buy in September

1. Best TV overall: Samsung QN90A Neo QLED TV

The ultimate QLED TV

Specifications

Available Screen Sizes: 55, 65, 75, 85 inches

Screen Type: QLED

Refresh Rate: Hz

HDMI ports: 4 HDMI (1 HDMI )

Size: x x 1 inches

Weight: pounds

Reasons to buy

+Beautiful, thin design+Neo QLED delivers incredible brightness+Impressive anti-glare abilities+New solar-chargeable remote

Reasons to avoid

-Visible blooming at times-Just one HDMI port-No Dolby Vision support

The Samsung QN90A Neo QLED TV combines Samsung's highly refined quantum dot technology with the tight control of mini-LED backlighting, resulting in one of the best TV displays you'll ever see. Brilliant color and unmatched brightness make for superb performance, and Samsung pairs that with a bounty of smart TV functions and genuinely intelligent features, like a solar-powered remote control that eliminates the need to swap out batteries – delivering eco-friendly design and unbeaten convenience at the same time.

The whole thing is packed into a gorgeous 1-inch-thick design that contains a huge array of smart features, potent Dolby Atmos sound and some of the best performance we've ever seen. HDMI connectivity comes standard, along with gamer-friendly features and impressive millisecond lag time for an unparalleled gaming experience. It's the best TV we've seen this year, and the winner of the Tom's Guide Award for Best TV, and a second award as the best gaming TV of the year.

Read our full Samsung QN90A Neo QLED TV review.

2. Best TV value: TCL 6-Series Roku TV (R)

The best TV value

Specifications

Available Screen Sizes: 55, 65, 75 inches

Screen Type: QLED

Refresh Rate: Hz

HDMI ports: 4 HDMI, 1 USB

Size: x x inches

Weight: pounds

Reasons to buy

+Excellent QLED and mini-LED display+Great gaming performance+Roku TV offers a huge app selection and easy interface+Improved Roku remote

Reasons to avoid

-Sound is a little weak-Roku is missing some of the latest apps

The TCL 6-Series Roku TV (R) offers enormous value for it's affordable price, offering premium picture quality and a great smart TV experience for much less than the competition. As TCL's best mainstream smart TV the R ups the ante with mini-LED backlighting in addition to QLED. The result is impressive color and brightness, with some of the best HDR performance we've seen on anything this side of an OLED display. It's enough to win a Tom's Guide Award for best innovation in TVs.

But TCL keeps delivering more, like THX Certified Game Mode, which makes the 6-Series one of the best gaming TVs available, even for yet-to-be-released consoles like the PS5 and the Xbox Series X. From the design's smart touches, like cable management in the stand, to the always-solid Roku TV platform, the TCL 6-Series R is the best TV value, and it's not even close.

Read our full TCL 6-Series Roku TV (R) review.

3. Best home theater OLED: LG G1 OLED TV

A premium OLED with stunning design

Specifications

Available Screen Sizes: 55, 65, 77 inches

Screen Type: OLED

Refresh Rate: Hz

HDMI ports: 4 HDMI

Size: x x inches

Weight: pounds

Reasons to buy

+Exclusive OLED evo panel delivers brighter picture+More affordable than last year’s Gallery Series+Same stunningly-thin design+New remote is a major improvement

Reasons to avoid

-OLED evo offers minimal improvement-WebOS is disappointing

The LG G1 OLED TV is the updated version of LG's superb Gallery OLED, boasting a premium 20 millimeter-thick design and sleek flush-to-the-wall mounting setup. The design is impeccable – enough to win best TV design in the Tom's Guide Awards. It's still the best 4K OLED TV made by LG, but as the first TV with LG's second-gen OLED evo technology, it falls short of some claimed performance improvements we were pretty excited for.

That said, the LG G1 OLED is still an impressive OLED set, and LG has even knocked the price down a bit, while updating almost everything else about the set. The slim OLED features more comfortable remote control, enhanced gaming features, and the latest version of webOS, all while delivering the same excellent picture quality and impeccable sound that we expect from LG's best OLED models. The LG G1 OLED TV stands as a reminder of just how far modern TV technology has come — we just hope it hasn’t plateaued.

Read our full LG G1 OLED TV review.

4. Our favorite OLED: LG CX OLED

Last year's hottest TV

Specifications

Available Screen Sizes: 48, 55, 65, 77 inches

Screen Type: OLED

Refresh Rate: Hz

HDMI ports: 4 HDMI , 2 USB

Size: x x inches

Weight: pounds

Reasons to buy

+Stunning picture+Excellent smart TV features+Top notch sound capabilities+Ultra thin design

Reasons to avoid

-Relatively high price

The LG CX OLED is the best 4K smart TV, and the best TV overall, with an amazing display, built-in Google Assistant and Amazon Alexa support, and a ton of other smart features. From LG's webOS to the addition of smart home control and an intuitive motion-control remote, it's one of the smartest TVs we've ever seen.

LG has improved on its superb OLED with a more powerful processor, the addition of Dolby Vision IQ (which adjusts HDR performance based on the ambient lighting) and beefs up the sound with AI-powered audio tuning. And while the LG CX OLED's premium price might put off some shoppers, it packs in more premium value than more expensive OLED competitors, while still delivering an unparalleled picture. It's the TV to beat.

Read our full LG CX OLED review.

5. Best OLED TV value: Vizio OLED TV

Incredible OLED quality at an affordable price

Specifications

Available Screen Sizes: 55, 65 inches

Screen Type: OLED

Refresh Rate: Hz

HDMI ports: 4 HDMI, 1 USB

Size: x x inches

Weight: pounds

Reasons to buy

+Ultra-low price for an OLED+Generally strong picture and audio quality+SmartCast provides plenty of smart features and free video content

Reasons to avoid

-Gaming performance could be better-Cumbersome stand

The Vizio OLED TV is the most affordable OLED TV on the market, and the first to offer a less-premium alternative to offerings from LG and Sony to shoppers in the United States. Selling for hundreds of dollars less than the competition, the Vizio OLED packs plenty of smart features alongside the 4K OLED display, and delivers the sort of premium picture quality that normally costs much more.

Vizio's SmartCast smart TV platform has also expanded its app selection significantly, and all of the major apps you might want – from Netflix to Disney+ – are available right on the TV. The few that aren't offered on the home screen (HBO Max is the most glaring omission) can still be enjoyed through the TV's built-in Google Cast and AirPlay 2 support. Combine all of this with an improved remote control design and great sound with better-than-average bass, and you've got an easy pick for affordable OLED TVs, and the winner of the Tom's Guide Award for best value TV.

Read our full Vizio OLED TV review. 

6. Best Sony OLED: Sony Bravia XR A80J

An excellent OLED with next-gen tech

Specifications

Available Screen Sizes: 55, 65, 77 inches

Screen Type: OLED

Refresh Rate: Hz

HDMI ports: 4

Size: x 33 x inches [65in model, w/o stand]

Weight: pounds [65in model, w/o stand]

Reasons to buy

+Outstanding picture, audio quality+Lots of dynamic and smart features that really work+Powerful Google TV interface

Reasons to avoid

-Dynamic adjustments needed for best picture-Not all HDMI ports support HDMI Bravia Core streaming service doesn’t dazzle

The Sony Bravia XR A80J is absolutely packed with futuristic technologies: this 4K OLED TV has HDR, a Hz refresh rate, ATSC tuner, Google TV streaming and Sony's own Bravia Core service, Acoustic Surface Audio+ technology… the list goes on. Sure, not everyone will need everything here, but it's nice to have the option.

Just as importantly, it also excels at the basics — contrast is superb, colors are rich and varied, viewing angles are impressive and it handles upscaling well. Sound is also excellent and Google TV is a big upgrade on the older Android TV. Against that, the XR A80J requires a little more tweaking in order to look its best; it's fine out of the box, but to really reach its full potential, you'll want to play around with various modes. It's not the cheapest and other sets beat it purely based on picture quality, but as an all-round package the A80J is a great choice.   

Read our full Sony Bravia XR A80J review.

7. Best Hisense TV: Hisense U8G Android TV

A great Android TV

Specifications

Available Screen Sizes: 55, 65 inches

Screen Type: LCD with Quantum dot

Refresh Rate: Hz

HDMI ports: 4 (2 HDMI , 2 HDMI )

Size: x x inches

Weight: pounds

Reasons to buy

+Very bright+Excellent sharpness, color and contrast+Low lag time

Reasons to avoid

-Overactive motion smoothing-Mediocre viewing angles

The Hisense U8G Android TV is our favorite Hisense model, and one of the best Android TVs around. With a quantum dot color and integrated Chromecast and Google Assistant, it's a full-featured smart TV that offers great quality for a reasonable price. With support for both Dolby Vision and HDR10+, it also offers the best HDR format support you can find, along with Dolby Atmos sound. It has built-in voice control with room-listening microphones, effectively letting you use the TV as a smart speaker, and offering the sort of smart home integration and control that would normally cost much more.

In our review, we were especially impressed by the U8G's brightness, which exceeds nits of peak brightness and combines with the better-than-average HDR support for great performance that brings out highlights and shadows. With few complaints and lots of great perks, the Hisense U8G ANdroid TV is easily our new favorite Hisense model.

Read our full Hisense U8G Android TV (65U8G) review.

8. Best budget QLED: TCL 5-Series Roku TV (S)

Quantum dot enhancement for less

Specifications

Available Screen Sizes: 50, 55, 65, 75 inches

Screen Type: LCD with Quantum dot

Refresh Rate: 60 Hz

HDMI ports: 4 HDMI

Size: x x inches

Weight: pounds

Reasons to buy

+Faithful colors+Built-in Roku smarts+Excellent price

Reasons to avoid

-Mediocre sound-Modest brightness

The TCL 5 Series Roku TV does what TCL does best, delivering a surprisingly great mix of features and performance at an excellent affordable price. With even the largest model selling for less than $, you get the superb color and brightness of QLED, as well as Roku's user-friendly smart TV interface, which puts thousands of apps right at your fingertips.

In addition to the excellent color accuracy and full color gamut offered by the QLED display, it offers top-of-the-line HDR support, with Dolby Vision in addition to basic HDR10 and HLG formats. With input lag clocking in at milliseconds, it's also one of the best affordable gaming TVs you can buy. And it's roughly half the price of Samsung's equivalent QLED TV, making it one of the best values in smart TVs.

Read our full TCL 5-Series Roku TV (S) review. 

9. Affordable OLED: LG BX OLED

A solid entry-level OLED model

Specifications

Available Screen Sizes: 55, 65 inches

Screen Type: OLED

Refresh Rate: Hz

HDMI ports: 4 HDMI , 2 USB

Size: x x inches

Weight: pounds

Sours: https://www.tomsguide.com/us/best-tvs,reviewhtml
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TV Buying Guide

As we previously noted, one of the most exciting recent TV developments is high dynamic range, or HDR. When done right, HDR boosts a TV's brightness, contrast, and color, making the pictures on the screen look more like real life.

As you can see in the dramatized image below, when HDR is at work you'll see details that might not otherwise be obvious, from the texture of the brick on a shady walkway to nuances in the white clouds in a daytime sky.

You'll also see brighter, more realistic "specular highlights," which are glints of light, such as the sun's reflection off a car's chrome bumper or an airplane wing. With HDR, those highlights pop; without it, they wouldn’t stand out against other bright objects.

HDR does all that by increasing the contrast between the brightest whites and the darkest blacks a TV can produce. That’s where the "dynamic range" in the name comes from.

"When done well, HDR presents more natural illumination of image content," says Claudio Ciacci, who heads the Consumer Reports TV testing program. "HDR can flex its dynamic-range muscles in strong sunlit scenes that push the TV's contrast to the limits," he adds, "but you'll also see HDR's subtler benefits on more simply lit scenes."

Typically, HDR TVs also produce more vibrant, varied colors than other sets. That’s because HDR is often paired with "wide color gamut," or WCG, capability.

Standard HDTVs can display about 17 million colors, but those with WCG can display up to a billion. That’s like giving your TV a larger box of crayons to play with.

But you won't see all that fantastic contrast and color every time you turn on the TV. You have to be playing a movie or TV show that has been mastered to take advantage of HDR and WCG. You can get 4K content with HDR right now from streaming services, on 4K Blu-ray discs, and even from DirecTV's satellite TV service. But we expect to see more HDR content become available, including through a new over-the-air broadcast standard that’s being launched in many markets this year. (Find out where you can watch 4K content with HDR.)

Types of HDR
So far, we've been talking about HDR as if it were just one technology, but there are a few types of HDR, each following a different set of technical specs. 

This can get complicated, and before we get into the details there’s some good news.

First, your TV should automatically detect the type of HDR being used in the content and choose the right way to play it. 

Second, the type of HDR doesn't seem to be too important right now. What we've seen in our labs is that top-performing TVs can do a great job with different types of HDR. The quality of the TV is more important. So it makes sense to buy the best TV you can regardless of the type of HDR it supports.

However, if you’d like to understand the differences among types of HDR, here’s an overview.

One type, called HDR10, has been adopted as an open standard. It’s free to use, and all 4K TVs with HDR support it. That’s also true of all 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray players and HDR programming, so you won’t be stuck with a set that can’t play HDR.

But some TVs also offer another type of HDR, called Dolby Vision, which is being promoted as an enhanced version of HDR Companies pay a licensing fee to use it. On paper it has some advantages. In particular, it supports “dynamic” metadata, where the brightness levels for a movie or show can be tweaked scene by scene. By contrast, HDR10 uses "static" metadata, where brightness levels are set for the entire movie or show.

Dolby Vision isn’t alone in using dynamic metadata, though. There's a newer version of HDR10, called HDR10+. It, too, has dynamic metadata, making HDR10 more like Dolby Vision. Right now it’s supported mainly by Samsung, which developed HDR10+, and Amazon, which has said it will support HDR10+ in its streaming service. We’ll be watching to see whether other TV manufacturers adopt it.

You may also hear something in the coming months about another HDR format, called HLG (hybrid log gamma). It could be important if it’s adopted for the next generation of free over-the-air TV signals, which will follow a standard called ATSC Many new TVs already support HLG, but it looks like others will be able to get firmware updates if necessary. This matters only for people who get TV through antennas, which are making a comeback.

Are All HDR TVs Created Equal?
No. Our tests show that not every TV with "HDR" written on the box produces equally rich, lifelike images. That’s one reason we now provide a separate HDR score in our TV ratings.

First of all, TVs are all over the map when it comes to picture quality, HDR or no HDR. But there are also challenges specific to this technology. Most notably, a TV might not be bright enough to really deliver on HDR. To understand why, you need to know your “nits,” the units used to measure brightness.

Better-performing HDR TVs typically generate at least nits of peak brightness, with top performers hitting 1, nits or more. But many HDR TVs produce only to nits. With an underpowered TV, the fire of a rocket launch becomes a single massive white flare. With a brighter television, you’d see tongues of fire and smoke, as if you were really there.

"The benefits of HDR are often lost with mediocre displays," Ciacci says.

How Can I Tell a Great HDR TV From a Bad One?
Unfortunately, you can’t just read the packaging—or even rely on how the picture looks in the store.

Some TVs carry an Ultra HD Premium logo, indicating that they’ve been certified as high-performance sets by an industry group called the UHD Alliance, but not all companies are going along. For example, LG and Samsung participate in the program; Sony and Vizio don't.

What to do instead? Check our TV ratings, which now have a score for HDR.

As you'll see, the TVs with the best HDR tend to be the priciest. But there are also some good choices for people who want to spend less. And if you're buying a smaller set or just want to wait on 4K and HDR, you can find several good—and inexpensive—options.

Sours: https://www.consumerreports.org/cro/tvs/buying-guide/index.htm

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Sets best 2015 television

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History of the Samsung TV 1970 to 2020 Evolution

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