Hear my song 2014

Hear my song 2014 DEFAULT

'Hear My Song' silenced by Hallmark Hall of Fame, CBS

Hallmark Hall of Fame pulled the movie "Hear My Song" from airing on CBS on April 16.

If you were settling in to watch the Hallmark Hall of Fame movie Saturday night, you may have been taken aback to see a re-run of “NCIS: New Orleans” flash across your screen instead.

If you were disappointed, you weren’t the only one – as a matter of fact, a school and students in New Jersey are squarely in the middle of the situation.

“Hear My Song,” whose stars include Dustin Hoffman, Kathy Bates, Debra Winger, Kevin McHale, Eddie Izzard and more, is a 2014 film that tells the story of a troubled orphan whose life turns around after he enters a choir boarding school and embraces his talent and the power of music.

While Hallmark says the film was “not intended to depict any particular individual, organization or institution,” students from the American Boychoir School in Princeton took part in filming and contributed to the movie’s soundtrack, the school says. Many believe the film largely was based on the historic school.

According to a previous Gannett New Jersey article, the film's director, Francois Girard, attended a screening of what was then dubbed "Boychoir" at Princeton Garden Theater in May 2015, an event which served as the kickoff for a weekend of fundraising activities for the school.

READ MORE: How to keep the music playing at American Boychoir School

The article says Girard worked closely with the school's current music director and the students who performed in the film, and visited the school as part of his research.

"I was exposed to a different kind of music and discovered a way of teaching that I did not know," Girard said. "It was extraordinary to see them at work. What they accomplish goes way beyond music, they engage in a way of teaching that we should all support."

Girard said at the time that if he had a 12-year-old son, he would insist that he attend American Boychoir School, the story said.

Originally titled “Boychoir” when planned as a feature film, Hallmark picked up the rights and it was to make its nationwide premiere on CBS on Saturday until CBS issued a short statement earlier in the week saying its lineup had been shuffled.

Hallmark issued the following statement and posted it on its Facebook page:

“Hallmark Hall of Fame’s ‘Hear My Song’ will not air as scheduled. ‘Hear My Song’ is a fictional story about a troubled but talented boy who overcomes great odds to find success. While the movie and actors were not intended to depict any particular individual, organization or institution, Hallmark was recently made aware of serious allegations of misconduct made many years ago at a school similar to the one depicted in the movie. After careful consideration, it was decided that the movie will not air on CBS, Hallmark Channel or Hallmark Movies & Mysteries.”

The “serious allegations” alluded to are a series of sexual assault allegations dating back decades. In 2002, the New York Times reported on a series of at least four lawsuits alleging sexual abuse at the school, including two that had been settled, one for $850,000.

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The school does not deny the ties to incidents of the past, saying Friday on its Facebook page, “The decision (not to air the film) stems from decades-old incidents of sexual misconduct that we have publicly acknowledged in the past. These past incidents were wrong, reprehensible, and caused pain to students and their families. We recognize their suffering.”

However, the school believes that not airing “Hear My Song” does a disservice to its current students.

Its statement also reads:

“The American Boychoir School wants to respond directly to CBS and Hallmark Hall of Fame’s decision to not air 'Hear My Song', the feature film originally titled 'Boychoir' starring Dustin Hoffman and Kathy Bates. As you know, the movie included a number of our students who contributed to the soundtrack and who appeared as extras.

“The American Boychoir School today promotes a caring, healthy culture that provides a nurturing environment for our students. We receive regular advice and training from local child welfare organizations, including PEI Kids and the New Jersey Child Abuse Prevention programs. We follow the strictest guidelines to prevent abuse." The school details a comprehensive child protection plan on its website.

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Its statement continues:

“While we do not seek to silence criticism, our students and their dedicated faculty and staff are being unjustly punished for events that happened long ago and do not reflect our school today. Our boys want to learn, sing, and contribute to the arts — be it on stage, on tour, or in film. They are justifiably proud of their work on this movie, and our community shares that pride.”

"Hear My Song" was scheduled to air on CBS on April 16.

So, was the networks’ decision to silence “Hear My Song” the right move?

That question only leads to others. Did the film’s producers know about the sexual abuse allegations? Was it a conscious decision on their part to leave out any mention in order to celebrate the positives happening today, or was it a whitewashing or rewriting of events? Can an institution fully recover from a series of incidents like that? Are we justified in punishing current students for the actions of authority figures a generation or more ago? To what end?

No matter the answers to those questions, this situation begs for opening a dialogue.

It’s Sexual Assault Awareness Month, get those questions out there and start a discussion.

READ MORE: What to teach your child about sexual abuse

I urge the producers and networks to get together and turn what right now is opening old wounds and causing new ones into something that truly makes a positive difference in people’s lives.

Find a way to allow the work of all of the actors and the creative team, particularly the students caught in the middle, to be seen, but that doesn’t shove the suffering of others in the past under the rug. Whether than includes airing a PSA during the film, sharing with people in need how to get help or more direct volunteer work, financial support or otherwise, acknowledging that these incidents happened and that something positive is being done is huge.

Work together to raise awareness, so that a movie about the healing power of music can get out into the world and spread that message.

Ilana Keller: 732-643-4260; [email protected]; Twitter: @IlanaKeller

Sours: https://www.app.com/story/entertainment/movies/2016/04/17/hear-my-song-silenced-hallmark-hall-fame-cbs/83161620/

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Hear My Song Photos

Movie Info

Nightclub owner Mickey O'Neill (Adrian Dunbar), a fast-talking charmer, has figured out a way to save his financial sinkhole of a business: book famous Irish tenor Josef Locke (William Hootkins) for a performance. There are several major problems, however -- Locke has been in exile for years and the man O'Neill has been in contact with is a con artist. O'Neill's reputation is destroyed, but, when the real Locke (Ned Beatty) shows up to perform, his luck may turn for the better.

  • Rating:

    R

  • Genre:

    Romance

  • Original Language:

    English

  • Director:

    Peter Chelsom

  • Producer:

    Alison Owen

  • Writer:

    Peter Chelsom

  • Release Date (Streaming):

  • Box Office (Gross USA):

    $3.0M

  • Runtime:

  • Sound Mix:

    Surround

Cast & Crew

Sours: https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/hear_my_song
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critics consensus

Boychoir rests heavily -- and not always comfortably -- on the shoulders of Dustin Hoffman, whose typically excellent work isn't always quite enough to compensate for an overly predictable drama.Read critic reviews

Boychoir Photos

Movie Info

A demanding choir master (Dustin Hoffman) at an elite music academy pushes a gifted but rebellious student (Garrett Wareing) to fulfill his true potential.

Cast & Crew

Sours: https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/boychoir

Boychoir (film)

2014 film

Boychoir is a 2014 American drama film directed by François Girard and written by Ben Ripley.[3] The film stars Dustin Hoffman, Kathy Bates, Debra Winger, Josh Lucas and the American Boychoir School.[4]

Plot[edit]

Stetson Tate is a 12-year-old student who is disruptive and often gets in trouble, but displays a natural affinity with music. His single mother, who was struggling with a drink problem, dies in a car accident. His father, who has a wife and two daughters sends him to an elite music boarding school, the fictional National Boychoir Academy, to keep Stet's existence a secret. Stet is admitted due to his vocal ability but also the generous amount of money the father pays them.

Stet struggles to fit in, because the other pupils are privileged children, and he cannot read music. Stet's behavior is also problematic for some of the staff. However, he works hard, learning music theory and practicing his vocal technique, and becomes one of the best singers, which allows him to join on the choir's tours.

Stet's father's family receives tickets, anonymously sent by the academy, for an important performance of the choir. Stet's father does not want to go, for fear of revealing his secret son, but the family attend. After the concert he decides to transfer Stet to a school in Switzerland, but Stet, encouraged by staff member Carvelle, refuses to go. Carvelle threatens the father to expose his secret, and the father keeps Stet at the school.

Stet and Devon, another student, develop an antagonistic relationship. Devon exposes Stet's mother's criminal record to the other students, causing Stet to beat him in his room. The teachers councils considers expulsions for both of them, but delays the decision as those students are needed for a representation in New York. The New York representation goes without any incident, but soon after, Stet's voice starts to change as he grows older.

The father ultimately tells his family, and his wife accepts this. Stet starts living with them.

Cast[edit]

Production[edit]

Hoffman stars in Boychoir as the choir master Carvelle, with Bates as the school's headmistress; the director is François Girard with a script by Ben Ripley. Originally, the cast was to include Alfred Molina, but he left the project.[3] In February 2014, Debra Winger, Eddie Izzard, Kevin McHale, Josh Lucas, and newcomers Garrett Wareing, Joe West, River Alexander, and Grant Venable joined the cast.[5] Wareing plays a young man who joins a boys' choir; Winger plays the boy's Odessa, Texas school principal; Izzard, replacing Alfred Molina, will play Drake, the choir master's right-hand at the school; Lucas plays the boy's estranged father. McHale portrayed a young music teacher who champions the boy and West, Alexander and Venable play other boys in the chorus.[5]

Filming[edit]

Principal photography began in February 2014 in New York City and in Stamford, New Haven, and Fairfield, Connecticut, some at Fairfield University.[3][7]

Release[edit]

Boychoir premiered at the 2014 Toronto International Film Festival on September 5, 2014 before receiving a limited release in the United States on April 3, 2015.

Hallmark Cards subsequently bought the distribution rights to air the film on its Hallmark Hall of Fame program. Boychoir was retitled Hear My Song and was planned to air on CBS on April 16, 2016.[8] However, on April 13, 2016, the premiere was cancelled at the last minute.[9]

Reception[edit]

Boychoir received mixed reviews from critics. On review aggregator website Rotten Tomatoes, the film has a 45% rating based on 44 reviews for an average rating of 5.22/10. The consensus states: "Boychoir rests heavily – and not always comfortably  on the shoulders of Dustin Hoffman, whose typically excellent work isn't always quite enough to compensate for an overly predictable drama."[10] On Metacritic, the film holds a 51 out of 100 rating based on 10 critics, indicating "mixed or average reviews".[11]

Soundtrack[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^"BOYCHOIR (PG)". British Board of Film Classification. December 17, 2014. Retrieved December 17, 2014.
  2. ^"Boychoir (2014)". The Numbers. Retrieved August 29, 2015.
  3. ^ abc"Dustin Hoffman To Star In 'Boychoir'; Alfred Molina, Kathy Bates Round Out Cast". deadline.com. October 30, 2013. Retrieved February 25, 2014.
  4. ^Debruge, Peter. "Toronto Film Review: 'Boychoir'". Variety. Retrieved April 10, 2015.
  5. ^ abcKilday, Gregg (February 24, 2014). "Debra Winger and Eddie Izzard Join 'Boychoir'". hollywoodreporter.com. Retrieved February 25, 2014.
  6. ^"Playbill".
  7. ^Dunne, Susan (February 13, 2014). "Dustin Hoffman To Film 'Boychoir' In Connecticut". courant.com. Archived from the original on March 8, 2014. Retrieved February 25, 2014.
  8. ^Malone, Michael (March 3, 2016). "Dustin Hoffman, Kathy Bates Star in Hallmark Movie on CBS". NextTV. Retrieved June 25, 2020.
  9. ^"Why CBS Pulled the Plug on Hallmark Movie Starring Two Oscar Winners | TVWeek". www.tvweek.com. Retrieved April 14, 2016.
  10. ^"Boychoir". Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved May 12, 2020.
  11. ^"Boychoir". Metacritic. Retrieved August 29, 2015.

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boychoir_(film)

My 2014 hear song

Hallmark scuttles ‘Hear My Song’ due to decades old sex scandal

Two dependable forces, CBS and “Hallmark Hall of Fame,” left TV viewers perplexed Saturday.

That was when the movie “Hear My Song” was replaced by reruns. The reason involved accusations of sex-abuse at the American Boychoir School, decades ago.

None of that was covered in the film, a fictional tale of a hard-scrabble kid who was transformed by music. “Song” was directed by Francois Girard – an art-film favorite since the 1993 “Thirty Two Short Films About Glenn Gould” -- and co-starred Oscar-winners Dustin Hoffman and Kathy Bates.

But it revived anger from people who had seen officials try to duck responsibility for the abuse. The school settled some cases (one for $850,000), filed for Chapter 11 protection and moved twice.

Created in 1937 in Columbus, Ohio, the school (Grades 4-8) had thrived near Princeton. Its choirs sang for several presidents and Pope Paul VI and backed Beyonce at the Academy Awards.

In 2002, however, the New York Times wrote: “A dozen alumni from the 1960s to the 1980s described a pattern of sex abuse ... by two longtime choirmasters and nine other staff members.”

The choirmaster resigned, and the school tried to have the blame confined to its employees, or to the boys, for not reporting it. Eventually, it sold its campus and moved twice, now to Hopewell, N.J.

All of this is unfamiliar turf for “Hallmark Hall of Fame,” which tends to be benign.

It began in 1951 by commissioning the now-classic mini-opera “Amahl and the Night Visitors” (which, ironically, starred an American Boychoir student). Then came Shakespearean plays and a switch to original movies. Hallmark has said the 1986 “The Promise” is “the most-honored dramatic special in television history,” with Emmys and Golden Globes, plus a Peabody, a Humanitas and a Christopher.

There have been three and four films a year, usually pointed to a greeting-card time; “Hear My Song” -- three weeks before Mother's Day – stood out for “Hall of Fame” as:

•A return to a broadcast network, after some years of being confined to the Hallmark Channel.

•A film not produced by Hallmark. Originally called “Boychoir,” it had a brief movie run in 2014. Hallmark bought it, and dubbed it “Hear My Song”, which is also the title of a 1991 film.

Then the backlash began. Although the school in the film is fictional, it was patterned after American Boychoir School; some of Boychoir's students are in the cast and its choir provides the soundtrack. “Song” was shown at the school, to launch a fundraising campaign.

Last week – too late for TV magazines and many daily papers – the film was pulled. “Hallmark was recently made aware of serious allegations of misconduct made many years ago at a school similar to the one depicted in the movie,” an announcement said. “After careful consideration, it was decided that the movie will not air on CBS, Hallmark Channel or Hallmark Movies & Mysteries.”

The school responded with its own press release: “Our students and their designated faculty and staff are being unjustly punished for events that happened long ago and do not reflect our school today. Our boys ... are justifiably proud of their work on this movie and our community shares that pride.”

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Sours: https://www.lansingstatejournal.com/story/entertainment/television/2016/04/18/hallmark-scuttles-hear-song-decades-old-sex-scandal/83183990/
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