Soul jar 5e

Soul jar 5e DEFAULT

Magic Jar D&D 5th Edition

  • Level: 6
  • Casting time: 1 Minute
  • Components: V, S, M*
  • Range(area): Self
  • Attack(save): CHA save
  • Damage(effect): Control
  • School: Necromancy
  • Duration: Until Dispelled

Magic Jar 5e

Your soul leaves your body and falls into a catatonic state and enters the container that you used for the spell’s material component. While your soul lives in the container, you know about your surroundings as if you were in the space of the container. You cannot move or use reactions. But you can protect your soul up to 100 feet out of the container. You can do this by returning to your body or you can try to possess a humanoid body. You can possess any humanoid body that is within 100 feet of you and can be seen by you. It must make a Charisma saving throw. On a failed save, your soul moves into the body of the target and the soul of the target are trapped in the container. On a successful save, the target fights your efforts to possess it and it cannot be attempted to possess again for 24 hours.

You control the body of the creature when you possessed it. The statistics of the creature replace your statistics but you retain your intelligence, Charisma Scores, and Wisdom Scores. Benefits of your own class features also retained. You cannot any class feature of the creature if it has any class level. In the meantime, the possessed soul of the creature perceives the container using its own senses but unable to move or take actions.

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Conjure Animals spell

When possessing a body, to return from the host body to the container that is within 100 feet of it, you can use your actions. Soul of the host creature will also return to its body. The creature dies if the host body dies when you were in it. Then, you must save a Charisma saving throw against your own spellcasting DC. You return to your body on a success but the body should be within 100 feet of you otherwise you may die.

Your soul immediately returns to the body if the container is destroyed. In case your body is away more than 100 feet from you or if your body is dead when you attempt to return it, you die. If container destroys when another creature’s soul in it, then the creature’s soul returns to its body if the body is within 100 feet and’s alive or if not so the creature will die.

The container is destroyed, when the Magic Jar 5e spell ends.

Magic Jar 5e

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Sours: https://dnd5echaractersheet.com/spells/magic-jar/

D&D 5E Magic Jar aftermath question

tommybahama said:

The problem of DM fiat is it breaks the verisimilitude of the fantasy world, is bad writing when authors do it, and foils the fun of the players' creative attempts to solve problems within the rules.

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Different perspectives I guess.

Verisimilitude is broken for me with the assumption that everyone everywhere has access to all the same abilities and spells exactly like everyone else. That doesn't make sense to me at all that there would never be anyone ever out there who had different abilities or new spells.

Why is it bad writing for a bad guy steeped in evil to have access to magic that no one else has or that he's taken farther than anyone before? Were Horcruxes in Harry Potter then a bad plot device just because the heroes didn't know how to make them?

I'm all for creative roleplaying. If the bad guy has something that no one has seen before, maybe that is a good plot hook for research or questing to find an oracle or... I don't know.

I'm not saying "let the guy do whatever he wants and there is no way to undo it ever". If you're going to present something non-RAW then you as the DM need to also know how the PC's can solve it... if you want it to be solved and not a narrative beat you're trying to hit.

Sometimes not everything has a solution, sometimes you lose. And that can be powerful RP opportunities as well, to know that your friend is truly gone and there is nothing you can do about it....

tommybahama said:

Perhaps our villain used the magic jar as a temporary solution because he wanted to use the NPC to spy on the party and also needed time to prepare for his final transfer to the clone?

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Sure, I'm all for that! RAW, It would have just had to have been a cast/created Clone and he'll get to it when he wants. It sounds like a great way to do it. It doesn't solve the OP's desire to make Magic Jar permanent, but it looks fun/cool and would make a good story!

tommybahama said:

Hmm, the villain has an ability to make clones. Can you ever truly kill him?

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Yeah... that was the 2e/3.x Manshoon issue in FR, he had too many of them around.

 

Sours: https://www.enworld.org/threads/magic-jar-aftermath-question.670258/
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Magic Jar: Is it useful?

Magic Jar
Necromancy
Level: Sor/Wiz 5
Components: V, S, F
Casting Time: 1 standard action
Range: Medium (100 ft. + 10 ft./level)
Target: One creature
Duration: 1 hour/level or until you return to your body
Saving Throw: Will negates; see text
Spell Resistance: Yes
By casting magic jar, you place your soul in a gem or large crystal (known as the magic jar), leaving your body lifeless. Then you can attempt to take control of a nearby body, forcing its soul into the magic jar. You may move back to the jar (thereby returning the trapped soul to its body) and attempt to possess another body. The spell ends when you send your soul back to your own body, leaving the receptacle empty.
To cast the spell, the magic jar must be within spell range and you must know where it is, though you do not need line of sight or line of effect to it. When you transfer your soul upon casting, your body is, as near as anyone can tell, dead.
While in the magic jar, you can sense and attack any life force within 10 feet per caster level (and on the same plane of existence). You do need line of effect from the jar to the creatures. You cannot determine the exact creature types or positions of these creatures. In a group of life forces, you can sense a difference of 4 or more Hit Dice between one creature and another and can determine whether a life force is powered by positive or negative energy. (Undead creatures are powered by negative energy. Only sentient undead creatures have, or are, souls.)
You could choose to take over either a stronger or a weaker creature, but which particular stronger or weaker creature you attempt to possess is determined randomly.

Attempting to possess a body is a full-round action. It is blocked by protection from evil or a similar ward. You possess the body and force the creature’s soul into the magic jar unless the subject succeeds on a Will save. Failure to take over the host leaves your life force in the magic jar, and the target automatically succeeds on further saving throws if you attempt to possess its body again.
If you are successful, your life force occupies the host body, and the host’s life force is imprisoned in the magic jar. You keep your Intelligence, Wisdom, Charisma, level, class, base attack bonus, base save bonuses, alignment, and mental abilities. The body retains its Strength, Dexterity, Constitution, hit points, natural abilities, and automatic abilities. A body with extra limbs does not allow you to make more attacks (or more advantageous two-weapon attacks) than normal. You can’t choose to activate the body’s extraordinary or supernatural abilities. The creature’s spells and spell-like abilities do not stay with the body.
As a standard action, you can shift freely from a host to the magic jar if within range, sending the trapped soul back to its body. The spell ends when you shift from the jar to your own body.
If the host body is slain, you return to the magic jar, if within range, and the life force of the host departs (it is dead). If the host body is slain beyond the range of the spell, both you and the host die. Any life force with nowhere to go is treated as slain.
If the spell ends while you are in the magic jar, you return to your body (or die if your body is out of range or destroyed). If the spell ends while you are in a host, you return to your body (or die, if it is out of range of your current position), and the soul in the magic jar returns to its body (or dies if it is out of range). Destroying the receptacle ends the spell, and the spell can be dispelled at either the magic jar or at the host’s location.
Focus: A gem or crystal worth at least 100 gp.

Click to expand...

Sours: https://www.enworld.org/threads/magic-jar-is-it-useful.195351/

sbiceptz wrote:OK, I'm researching the magic jar spell. Seems to be barely worth the trouble, but maybe I'm missing something, feel free to correct me. Where does the mind of the possessed go? What can you do with the possessed body?

I get the feeling this is one of those spells Gary started, and then half way in realized it wasn't working to well.

Any later clarity on how it should work, limitations and advantages?

Please illuminate!

I think you are missing the whole spell...it's insanely potent. Where does the possessed's mind go? Unclear. It may just be submerged/overwhelmed, or I used to like to rule it was jammed into the jar/helpless (but that's problematic to the BTB spell function). What can you do with the body? Anything you know how to do & it's physically capable of.

It get the feeling it's one of the spells that got <expletive deleted> up in making AD&D. The 1e AD&D spell section is likely the poorest in any D&D game & among the weakest sections of the game. Gawds, is it awful. It's simpler in classic (but massively overpowered, at least to most tastes)

BEFORE 1e:

OD&D/M&M pg 28-29 "Magic Jar: By means of this device the Magic-User houses his life force in some inanimate object (even a rock) and attempts to possess the body of any other creature within 12" of his Magic Jar. The container for his life force must be within 3" of his body at the time the spell is pronounced. Possession of another body takes place when the creature in question fails to make its saving throw against magic. If the possessed body is destroyed, the spirit of the Magic-User returns to the Magic Jar, and from thence it may attempt another possession or return to the Magic-Users body. The spirit of the Magic-User can return to the Magic Jar at any time he so desires. Note that if the body of the Magic-User is destroyed the life force must remain in a possessed body or the Magic Jar. If the Magic-Jar is destroyed the Magic-User is totally annihilated.

About the same time as 1e:

B/X, pg X17 "Magic Jar Range: 30'
Duration: special
With this spell, the caster puts his or her body in a trance and transfers his or her life-force to an inanimate object (magic jar) within range. From this object, the spell caster may attempt to possess (take over) any one creature within 120' of the magic jar. If the victim makes a successful saving throw, the possession has failed and the caster may not try that victim again for one game turn. If the victim fails the saving throw, the creature is possessed and its body will do as the caster wills- While under the control of the spell caster no spells of the possessed may be used. If the possessed body is destroyed, the magic-user or elf must return to the magic jar. From there the caster may try to possess another body or return to his or her own. The caster can be forced out of the possessed body by a dispel evil spell.

Destroying the magic jar while the caster's life force is in it kills the caster. Destroying the magic jar while the caster's life-force is in another body strands the life-force in the possessed body. Killing the caster's real body strands the life-force in the magic jar until the caster can possess another body! Once the caster returns to his or her real body the spell is over."

2e era: Bah, it much like 1e, but some more info. All my texts are not copying well, so look it up. It's way too <expletive deleted> long for me to type out.

3.5e SRD "Magic Jar
Necromancy
Level: Sor/Wiz 5
Components: V, S, F
Casting Time: 1 standard action
Range: Medium (100 ft. + 10 ft./level)
Target: One creature
Duration: 1 hour/level or until you return to your body
Saving Throw: Will negates; see text
Spell Resistance: Yes
By casting magic jar, you place your soul in a gem or large crystal (known as the magic jar), leaving your body lifeless. Then you can attempt to take control of a nearby body, forcing its soul into the magic jar. You may move back to the jar (thereby returning the trapped soul to its body) and attempt to possess another body. The spell ends when you send your soul back to your own body, leaving the receptacle empty.

To cast the spell, the magic jar must be within spell range and you must know where it is, though you do not need line of sight or line of effect to it. When you transfer your soul upon casting, your body is, as near as anyone can tell, dead.

While in the magic jar, you can sense and attack any life force within 10 feet per caster level (and on the same plane of existence). You do need line of effect from the jar to the creatures. You cannot determine the exact creature types or positions of these creatures. In a group of life forces, you can sense a difference of 4 or more Hit Dice between one creature and another and can determine whether a life force is powered by positive or negative energy. (Undead creatures are powered by negative energy. Only sentient undead creatures have, or are, souls.)

You could choose to take over either a stronger or a weaker creature, but which particular stronger or weaker creature you attempt to possess is determined randomly.

Attempting to possess a body is a full-round action. It is blocked by protection from evil or a similar ward. You possess the body and force the creature’s soul into the magic jar unless the subject succeeds on a Will save. Failure to take over the host leaves your life force in the magic jar, and the target automatically succeeds on further saving throws if you attempt to possess its body again.

If you are successful, your life force occupies the host body, and the host’s life force is imprisoned in the magic jar. You keep your Intelligence, Wisdom, Charisma, level, class, base attack bonus, base save bonuses, alignment, and mental abilities. The body retains its Strength, Dexterity, Constitution, hit points, natural abilities, and automatic abilities. A body with extra limbs does not allow you to make more attacks (or more advantageous two-weapon attacks) than normal. You can’t choose to activate the body’s extraordinary or supernatural abilities. The creature’s spells and spell-like abilities do not stay with the body.

As a standard action, you can shift freely from a host to the magic jar if within range, sending the trapped soul back to its body. The spell ends when you shift from the jar to your own body.

If the host body is slain, you return to the magic jar, if within range, and the life force of the host departs (it is dead). If the host body is slain beyond the range of the spell, both you and the host die. Any life force with nowhere to go is treated as slain.

If the spell ends while you are in the magic jar, you return to your body (or die if your body is out of range or destroyed). If the spell ends while you are in a host, you return to your body (or die, if it is out of range of your current position), and the soul in the magic jar returns to its body (or dies if it is out of range). Destroying the receptacle ends the spell, and the spell can be dispelled at either the magic jar or at the host’s location.

Focus
A gem or crystal worth at least 100 gp."

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Sours: https://www.dragonsfoot.org/forums/viewtopic.php?t=60974

Jar 5e soul

Magic Jar

Necromancy

By casting magic jar, you place your soul in a gem or large crystal (known as the magic jar), leaving your body lifeless. Then you can attempt to take control of a nearby body, forcing its soul into the magic jar. You may move back to the jar (thereby returning the trapped soul to its body) and attempt to possess another body. The spell ends when you send your soul back to your own body, leaving the receptacle empty.

To cast the spell, the magic jar must be within spell range and you must know where it is, though you do not need line of sight or line of effect to it. When you transfer your soul upon casting, your body is, as near as anyone can tell, dead.

While in the magic jar, you can sense and attack any life force within 10 feet per caster level (and on the same plane of existence). You do need line of effect from the jar to the creatures. You cannot determine the exact creature types or positions of these creatures. In a group of life forces, you can sense a difference of 4 or more Hit Dice between one creature and another and can determine whether a life force is powered by positive or negative energy. (Undead creatures are powered by negative energy. Only sentient undead creatures have, or are, souls.)

You could choose to take over either a stronger or a weaker creature, but which particular stronger or weaker creature you attempt to possess is determined randomly.

Attempting to possess a body is a full-round action. It is blocked by protection from evil or a similar ward. You possess the body and force the creature’s soul into the magic jar unless the subject succeeds on a Will save. Failure to take over the host leaves your life force in the magic jar, and the target automatically succeeds on further saving throws if you attempt to possess its body again.

If you are successful, your life force occupies the host body, and the host’s life force is imprisoned in the magic jar. You keep your Intelligence, Wisdom, Charisma, level, class, base attack bonus, base save bonuses, alignment, and mental abilities. The body retains its Strength, Dexterity, Constitution, hit points, natural abilities, and automatic abilities. A body with extra limbs does not allow you to make more attacks (or more advantageous two-weapon attacks) than normal. You can’t choose to activate the body’s extraordinary or supernatural abilities. The creature’s spells and spell-like abilities do not stay with the body.

As a standard action, you can shift freely from a host to the magic jar if within range, sending the trapped soul back to its body. The spell ends when you shift from the jar to your own body.

If the host body is slain, you return to the magic jar, if within range, and the life force of the host departs (it is dead). If the host body is slain beyond the range of the spell, both you and the host die. Any life force with nowhere to go is treated as slain.

If the spell ends while you are in the magic jar, you return to your body (or die if your body is out of range or destroyed). If the spell ends while you are in a host, you return to your body (or die, if it is out of range of your current position), and the soul in the magic jar returns to its body (or dies if it is out of range). Destroying the receptacle ends the spell, and the spell can be dispelled at either the magic jar or at the host’s location.

Focus

A gem or crystal worth at least 100 gp.

Sours: https://www.d20srd.org/srd/spells/magicJar.htm
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What happens to a soul trapped in a Magic Jar if the host body dies?

It seems to me that there are two possible ways to interpret how this spell relates to the soul of a dead creature:

Once a creature dies, its soul is beyond the control of this spell

By this interpretation, it would means that when the host body dies, the creature's soul behaves just like the soul of any creature who's died (presumably continuing on to its regularly scheduled afterlife).

If the host body dies while you’re in it, the creature dies,

Note that this is explicitly distinguishing between the body dying and the creature dying. Given that the body is already dead, if the soul remained trapped in the container after the body died, what would "the creature dies" even mean in this case?

After a creature dies, its soul is still under the control of this spell

By this interpretation, then presumably both the caster and the target's souls would still be affected by the spell.

If the host body dies while you're in it, [...] make a Charisma saving throw against your own spellcasting DC. On a success, you return to the container if it is within 100 feet of you. Otherwise, you die.

The wording here is pretty similar to the description of what happens to the target creature: if you fail your save, you die. It doesn't say anything about your soul leaving the host body; it only says that you die.

The only conditions the spell mentions for your soul leaving the host body are if:

  • You use your action to return to the container
  • You succeed at your saving throw when the host body dies
  • The container is destroyed
  • The spell ends

If you're dead, you can no longer take actions. If you failed your saving throw, that only leaves the end of the spell or the destruction of the container.

Conclusion

If the host's soul is permanently trapped in the container, then the same is true about the caster's soul and the host's dead body. Your soul is now trapped in the corpse of the host for as long as the host's soul is trapped in your container.

answered Oct 23 '18 at 13:04

Admiral JotaAdmiral Jota

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D&D 5th Edition

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Your body falls into a catatonic state as your soul leaves it and enters the container you used for the spell's material component. While your soul inhabits the container, you are aware of your surroundings as if you were in the container's space. You can't move or use Reactions. The only action you can take is to project your soul up to 100 feet out of the container, either returning to your living body (and Ending the spell) or attempting to possess a Humanoids body.

You can attempt to possess any Humanoid within 100 feet of you that you can see (creatures warded by a Protection from Evil and Good or Magic Circle ⁠spells can't be possessed). The target must make a Charisma saving throw. On a failure, your soul moves into the target's body, and the target's soul becomes trapped in the container. On a success, the target resists your efforts to possess it, and you can't attempt to possess it again for 24 hours.

Once you possess a creature's body, you control it. Your game Statistics are replaced by the Statistics of the creature though you retain your Alignment and your Intelligence, Wisdom, and Charisma scores. You retain the benefit of your own class feature. If the target has any class levels, you can't use any of its Class Features.

Meanwhile, the possessed creature's soul can perceive from the container using its own Senses, but it can't move or take Actions at all.

While possessing a body, you can use your action to return from the host body to the container if it is within 100 feet of you, returning the host creature's soul to its body. If the host body dies while you're in it, the creature dies, and you must make a Charisma saving throw against your own Spellcasting DC. On a success, you return to the container if it is within 100 feet of you. Otherwise, you die.

If the container is destroyed or the spell ends, your soul immediately returns to your body. If your body is more than 100 feet away from you, or if your body is dead when you attempt to return to it, you die. If another creature's soul is in the container when it is destroyed, the creature's soul returns to its body if the body is alive and within 100 feet. Otherwise, that creature dies.

When the spell ends, the container is destroyed.

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Material

A gem, crystal, reliquary, or some other ornamental container worth at least 500 gp

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Sours: https://roll20.net/compendium/dnd5e/Magic%20Jar


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